Rubb

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Rubb Building Systems
Type Private
Industry Engineering
Founded 1968
Headquarters Nesttun, Norway (Rubb Hall A/S)
Gateshead, England (Rubb Buildings Ltd.)
Sanford, Maine, United States (Rubb, Inc.)
Products Fabric buildings and shelters
Website www.rubb.com

Rubb Building Systems is a privately owned manufacturer of tension fabric buildings and shelters, also known as Rubb halls. With origins in Norway, the company now has locations in Rubbestadneset and Bergen, Norway, Sanford, Maine, and Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, United Kingdom. Rubb structures are used for many industrial applications, including as aircraft hangars, environmental remediation structures, salt sheds, port buildings, and sports buildings.

History[edit]

Rubb was founded in 1968 by Finn Haldorsen. The name originates from the small town of Rubbestadneset on the West Coast of Norway. In 1977 the company was expanded by establishing Rubb Buildings Ltd. in Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, England. In 1983 a third facility, Rubb, Inc., was created in the United States in Sanford, Maine. All three companies have full engineering, manufacturing and servicing capabilities.

Products and services[edit]

Rubb provides structures as either buildings or shelters. Buildings are fully engineered and designed to multiple design standards and building codes, including AISC, AISI, ASTM, ASCE, AWS, and NFPA in the United States, and British Standards (BS).[1] Shelters are designed to endure harsh weather, but the manufacturer makes no claims concerning load capability other than to provide destructive test results obtained from factory tests. [2]

Markets served[edit]

Rubb buildings and shelters have been used in a number of market segments.

Military[edit]

Much use of Rubb buildings has been made by military units, particularly the Royal air force (RAF), which used Rubb aircraft hangars in the Falkland islands, at RAF Stanley, to house Harrier and Phantom fighters after the liberation of the islands in 1982.

Other military uses include accommodation, logistic stores, garages, mess halls and many more.

Aircraft hangars[edit]

In the commercial aviation sector, Rubb has furnished aircraft hangars to major airline carriers including United Airlines and AirTran Airways. Rubb structures are currently located at Boston's Logan International Airport and at Atlanta International Airport. The aircraft hangars are primarily used for aircraft line maintenance of Boeing 717 and Boeing 777 aircraft.[3]

Sports buildings[edit]

Rubb sports buildings are predominantly found in the United Kingdom, including indoor football facilities for Newcastle United and West Bromwich Albion along with an indoor tennis court for the Chesterfield Lawn Tennis Club.[4] In the United States, examples of sports buildings include the multipurpose Portland Sports Complex in Portland, Maine [5] and the Challenge Unlimited equestrian facility in Andover, Massachusetts .[6]

Qualifications[edit]

All Rubb companies are ISO 9001:2000 certified with comprehensive quality control and inspection systems.

Recent news[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Rubb Building Systems Specifications". Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  2. ^ "Products: Portable Shelters and Temporary Structures". Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  3. ^ Barry, Tom (May 23, 2005). "AirTran's new hangar impervious and attractive". Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  4. ^ "Sports Buildings and Sports Structures Projects". Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  5. ^ Livingstone, Paul (2003-09-25). "Sport's Center's Target Market". Portland Press Herald. 
  6. ^ (Fall 2007). "Equine Delight" , PanStadia
  7. ^ "Today Show:AirTran introduces wireless Internet". Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  8. ^ "NASA - Max Launch Abort System Gallery". Retrieved 2009-07-10. 
  9. ^ "HURRICANE RITA: SOME PORTS BOUNCED BACK QUICKLY". Retrieved 2009-07-10. [dead link]

References[edit]

  • "Hangar success for Rubb in Scotland" (2001), Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology
  • "Adaptable Structure for Sport" (2008), Building for Leisure

External links[edit]