Ruben II, Prince of Armenia

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Roupen II
Lord of Cilicia / “Lord of the Mountains”
Lord of Armenian Cilicia
Reign 1169–1170
Predecessor Thoros II
Successor Mleh I
Spouse (none)
Issue (none)
House Roupenians
Father Thoros II
Mother An unnamed daughter of Regent Thomas
Born c. 1165
(unknown)
Died 1170
Hromgla
Burial (unknown)

Ruben II[citation needed] (Armenian: Ռուբեն Բ), also Roupen II[1][2] or Rupen II,[3] (c.1165–1170) was the seventh lord of Armenian Cilicia[1] or “Lord of the Mountains”[3] (1169–1170).[3]

Roupen was the son of Thoros II, lord of Armenian Cilicia, by his second wife (and great niece) whose name is unknown.[3] Thoros II abdicated in favour of his young son Roupen in 1169, and placed Roupen under the guardianship of the Regent Thomas[1] (Thomas was the child’s maternal grandfather).[3] However, Thoros II’s brother, Mleh disputed the succession; Mleh had fled to Nur ed-Din (the emir of Aleppo) and become Moslim after quarreling with Thoros II and attempting to assassinate him.[2]

Mleh refused an amicable settlement with Regent Thomas regarding the succession to the leadership of Cilicia and invaded the country with a force provided by Nur ed-Din.[1] Fearing for Roupen’s life, Thomas entrusted the young child into the care of the patriarch Nerses IV Shnorhali in Hromkla (today Rumkale in Turkey) and fled to Antioch.[1] This measure of caution, however, did not save the life of the young Roupen, who was followed by his uncle’s men and murdered at Hromgla.[1]

Thoros left a child under age, whom he committed, together with the country, to the care of a certain Baron and Baillie Thomas, his father-in-law, with an injunction to deliver to him the country as soon as the child should have attained his majority. Mleh (…) was with the Sultan of Aleppo, and hearing of the death of his brother he came with an army into the country, and dealt very cruelly with its inhabitants. Not being able to conquer the possessions of his brother he returned to Aleppo, and came back with still greater forces. Receiving a message from the Armenian Barons that they would freely acknowledge him as their sovereign, he sent back the Turks, and governed in peace for some time. But he soon drove into exile the Baillie Thomas, who went afterwards to Antioch. The child of Thoros was killed by the command of Mleh by some wicked people.

Smbat Sparapet: Chronicle[4]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Ghazarian, Jacob G. The Armenian Kingdom in Cilicia during the Crusades: The Integration of Cilician Armenians with the Latins (1080–1393). 
  2. ^ a b Runciman, Steven. A History of the Crusades – Volume II.: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East: 1100–1187. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Cawley, Charles (1 April 2009), Lords of the Mountains, Kings of (Cilician) Armenia (Family of Rupen), Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, retrieved July 2009 ,[better source needed]
  4. ^ Smbat Sparapet (Sempad the Constable) (2005). "Chronicle". History Workshop: Armenian Historical Sources of the 5th–15th Centuries (Selected Works). Robert Bedrosian’s Homepage. Retrieved 2009-07-21. 

Sources[edit]

  • Ghazarian, Jacob G: The Armenian Kingdom in Cilicia during the Crusades: The Integration of Cilician Armenians with the Latins (1080–1393); RoutledgeCurzon (Taylor & Francis Group), 2000, Abingdon; ISBN 0-7007-1418-9
  • Runciman, Steven: A History of the Crusades – Volume II.: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East: 1100–1187; Cambridge University Press, 1988, Cambridge; ISBN 0-521-06162-8

External links[edit]

Ruben II, Prince of Armenia
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Thoros II
Lord of Armenian Cilicia
1169–1170
Succeeded by
Mleh I