Rudolph King

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Rudolph King
Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives
In office
1943 – August 16, 1944
Preceded by Christian Herter
Succeeded by Frederick Willis
Massachusetts Registrar of Motor Vehicles
In office
August 16, 1944 – November 30, 1957
Preceded by Frank A. Goodwin
Succeeded by Clement A. Riley
Personal details
Born November 2, 1887
Horton Bluff, Nova Scotia
Died September 10, 1961(1961-09-10) (aged 73)
Millis, Massachusetts
Political party Republican
Residence Millis, Massachusetts
Profession Sales Manager and General Manager of Medway Shoes Manufacturing Corp.[1]

Rudolph Francis King (November 2, 1887[2] – September 10, 1961[3]) was an American politician who served as a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 1937–44 and was House Speaker from 1943-1944. Born in Horton Bluff, Nova Scotia, he had previously served as a member of the School Committee, Board of Assessors, and the Board of Health and Cemeteries and was the Town Moderator and Chairman of the Board of Selectman in Millis, Massachusetts.[2]

King resigned from the House on August 16, 1944 to become Registrar of Motor Vehicles.[4] In 1946 he was nominated by Governor Maurice J. Tobin to serve as State Commissioner of Public Works, but refused the offer.[5] In 1957, King was forced to retire following a vote by the Massachusetts Governor's Council to remove King from office after he reached the state's mandatory retirement age of 70.[6]

King was an unsuccessful candidate for a seat on the Governor's Council during the 1958 election.[7]

King died on September 10, 1961 in Millis, Massachusetts.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richard T. Howard. Public Officials of Massachusetts 1941-42. 
  2. ^ a b Richard T. Howard. Public Officials of Massachusetts 1943-44. 
  3. ^ a b "RUDOLPH F. KING". The New York Times. September 10, 1961. 
  4. ^ "Veterans May Get Insignia For Cars". The Daily Times. August 10, 1944. Retrieved 2010-03-27. 
  5. ^ Donald B. McCammond (May 1, 1946). "Cairnes Named by Tobin As Head of Public Works". Christian Science Monitor. 
  6. ^ "Council Forces King Retirement". Christian Science Monitor. November 27, 1957. 
  7. ^ "The News Letter". Sunday Herald. September 28, 1958. Retrieved 2010-03-27.