Ruger MK II

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Ruger MK II
Type Semi-automatic pistol
Place of origin  United States
Production history
Manufacturer Sturm, Ruger & Co.
Produced 1982-2005
Specifications
Weight 46 oz. (w/ 6 7/8 in bull barrel)
Length 11 1/8 in (w/ 6 7/8 in bull barrel)

Cartridge .22 LR
Action Blowback
Rate of fire semi-automatic
Feed system 10-round magazine + 1 in chamber

The Ruger MK II is a rimfire single-action semi-automatic pistol chambered in .22 Long Rifle and manufactured by Sturm, Ruger & Company. Ruger rimfire pistols are some of the most popular handguns made, with over three million sold.

Models[edit]

The MK II ("Mark Two") was made from 1982 to 2005. Previous models include the Standard, Ruger's first model, made from 1949 to 1982, and the MK I Target, made from 1951 to 1982. MK II variations include the Target models, which have heavier barrels and adjustable sights, and the 22/45 models, which have a polymer frame with a grip-angle that matches the Colt 1911 rather than the steel frame's Luger P08-like layout. The MK II was removed from production in 2004, when it was replaced by the MK III. All Ruger rimfire pistols are chambered in .22 Long Rifle only.

History and variations[edit]

Ruger Standard pistol, with aftermarket adjustable sights, made in 1963
Ruger Mark II Stainless Slab side Competition Target Model 22LR pistol with a Volquartsen profiled slab side V-Comp compensator, reflex sight mounted on a Volquartsen Weaver-style rail, 6 7/8 in precision-crowned barrel, and checkered thumbrest target grips.

The original Ruger pistol, now called the Standard, had no model number, as it was the first, and for a time, only gun made by Sturm, Ruger. Prior to Bill Ruger's partnership with Sturm, he had successfully duplicated two Baby Nambu pistols[1] while working in his garage, from a U.S. Marine's captured Nambu, shortly after World War II. Although deciding against marketing the Baby Nambu Pistols, Ruger did incorporate the Nambu style rear cocking device and modified the Nambu's silhouette, plus he added a 4.75 in (12.1 cm) lightweight barrel with fixed sights.

The MK I added a Target model, which had a 5.5 in (14 cm) bull barrel, or a 6.875 in (17.46 cm) heavy taper barrel and adjustable sights. The MK II added a slide stop that held the slide open on the last round, and also was available in stainless steel. The MK II has been available in a number of barrel lengths; 4.75 in (12.1 cm) and 6 in (15 cm) lightweight barrels; 4 in (10 cm), 5.5 in (14 cm), 6.875 in (17.46 cm) and 10 in (25 cm) bull barrels, and 5.25 in (13.3 cm) and 6.875 in (17.46 cm) heavy tapered barrels. All guns with bull or heavy tapered barrels are Target models, and are equipped with target sights consisting of an adjustable rear sight and a taller, wider front sight, with an aggressive undercut to reduce glare.

Some special variants that command higher prices are the Government Model, a model that was used for pistol training and competition by the United States Army[citation needed], and the Red Eagle models, which were made from 1949 to the year of company co-founder Alexander Sturm's death, in 1952. The Red Eagle models had the Ruger logo in red on a silver background. Since then, the Ruger logo on the grip panels has been either black on silver or silver on black, with the exception of a special 50th Anniversary model that had a silver eagle on a red background. The top of the line Government Competition Model comes with a 6.875 in (17.46 cm) "slab side" barrel (a bull barrel with the sides milled flat to save weight), laminated wood thumbrest grips, a low profile scope base, and scope rings; with the addition of a pistol scope, it makes an ideal entry level bullseye pistol.

Together with the MK I, the MK II was the suggested handgun in Paladin Press's controversial how-to book, Hit Man: A Technical Manual for Independent Contractors, due to low cost and reliability.

Suppressed variants[edit]

Title II AWC TM-Amphibian 'S' integrally-suppressed variant used by U.S. Navy SEALs

The suppressed Mk II is used by United States Navy SEALs[2] and pest control officers.[citation needed] This variant is considerably quieter than a standard Mk II and accurate to 70 m (230 ft).[3]

The AWC TM-Amphibian "S" is an integrally-suppressed variant of the Ruger Mk II Target .22 LR pistol. The sound suppressor uses a primary baffle of 303 stainless steel and a secondary baffle of 6061-T6 aluminium alloy. The AWC weapon manual states, "This suppressor is 'Amphibious' and can be fired with water. A couple of tablespoons of water can be poured into the suppressor for extra quiet operation."[4] It uses both standard and high velocity ammunition reliably and is finished in U.S. Navy spec stainless-matte finish. The pistol has an overall length of 13.25 in (33.7 cm), a suppressor length of 7 in (18 cm), a diameter of 1 in (2.5 cm) and weighs 41 oz (1,200 g).[5] This weapon is classified in the U.S. as a Title II weapon and requires a $200 transfer or manufacture tax in addition to registration with the ATF.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wilson, R. L. "Ruger & His Guns; A History Of The Man, The Company And Their Firearms." 1996. ISBN 0-7858-2103-1.
  2. ^ Jane's international defense review: Quarterly report (Janes Information Group) (3). 1996. "EALs may be equipped with a wide variety of small arms, ranging from the 0.22-caliber (LR) Ruger Mk 2 through..." 
  3. ^ The Directory of the World's Weapons. p119: Blitz Editions. 1996. ISBN 1-85605-348-2. 
  4. ^ L.W. McWilliams. TM-Amphibian 'S' Manual. AWC Systems Technology, 2001. p. 3.
  5. ^ 2009 AWC Product Guide, pp. 5-6.

External links[edit]