Rumpler G.I

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G.I, G.II and G.III
Role Bomber aircraft
National origin Germany
Manufacturer Rumpler
First flight 1915
Primary user Luftstreitkräfte
Number built ca 220

The Rumpler G.I was a bomber aircraft produced in Germany during World War I, together with refined versions known as the G.II and G.III.[1]

Design and development[edit]

Based on a prototype with the factory designation 4A15, the G.I and its successors were built to a conventional bomber design for their time, two-bay biplanes with unstaggered wings of unequal span.[2] The pilot sat in an open cockpit just forward of the wings, and open positions were provided the nose and amidships for a gunner and observer. The engines were mounted pusher-fashion in nacelles atop the lower wings and enclosed in streamlined cowlings.[2] Fixed tricycle undercarriage was fitted, with dual wheels on each unit.[2]

The G.II version was almost identical, but featured more powerful engines and carried a second 7.92 mm (.312 in) machine gun and increased bombload.[2] The G.III was again similar, but had engine nacelles that were now mounted on short struts clear of the lower wing.[2]

Variants[edit]

  • 4A15 - prototype with Benz Bz.III engines[3]
  • 5A15 - G.I production version with single machine gun and Benz Bz.III or Mercedes D.III engines[4] (ca 60 built)[2]
  • 5A16 - G.II production version with Benz Bz.IV engines and two machine guns[5] (ca. 72 built)[6]
  • 6G2 - G.III production version with Mercedes D.IV engines and two machine guns[7] (ca. 90 built)[6]

Specifications (G.III)[edit]

Data from Kroschel & Stützer 1994, p.140

General characteristics

  • Crew: Three
  • Length: 12.00 m (39 ft 4 in)
  • Wingspan: 19.30 m (63 ft 4 in)
  • Height: 4.50 m (19 ft 2 in)
  • Wing area: 73.0 m2 (785 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 2,365 kg (5,203 lb)
  • Gross weight: 3,620 kg (7,964 lb)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Mercedes D.IV, 190 kW (260 hp) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 165 km/h (103 mph)
  • Range: 700 km (440 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 5,000 m (16,000 ft)

Armament

  • 1 × trainable 7.92 mm (.312 in) Parabellum MG14 machine gun in nose
  • 1 × trainable 7.92 mm (.312 in) Parabellum MG14 machine gun in dorsal position
  • 250 kg (550 lb) of bombs

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Taylor 1989, p.772
  2. ^ a b c d e f The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft, p.2834
  3. ^ Gray & Thetford 1962, p.529
  4. ^ Gray & Thetford 1962, p.530
  5. ^ Gray & Thetford 1962, p.531
  6. ^ a b Kroschel & Stützer 1994, p.140
  7. ^ Gray & Thetford 1962, p.532

References[edit]

  • Gray, Peter; Owen Thetford (1962). German Aircraft of the First World War. London: Putnam. 
  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft. London: Aerospace Publishing. 
  • Kroschel, Günter; Helmut Stützer (1994). Die Deutschen Militärflugzeuge 1910–1918. Herford: Verlag E.S. Mittler & Sohn. 
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions.