Rupert of Deutz

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Rupert of Deutz

Rupert of Deutz (born c. 1075-1080, died c 1129 in Deutz)[1] was an influential Benedictine theologian, exegete and writer on liturgical and musical topics.

He was from Liège, and late in life became abbot of Deutz Abbey. His works include:

  • De voluntate Dei
  • De omnipotentia Dei
  • Commentaria in canticum canticorum
  • De divinis officiis
  • De Victoria Verbi Dei (The Victory of the Word of God).[2]
  • De Gloria et Honore Filii Hominis super Mattheum (The Glory and Honor of the Song of Man), composed about 1127.[3]
  • De Trinitate et operibus eius, written around 1112-16.[4]
  • De glorificatione Trinitatis et processione Spiritus sancti, written in 1128.[5]

His works were later scrutinized in relation with the doctrine of impanation, a Eucharistic heresy according to the Roman Catholic Church because--contrary to the dogma of transubstantiation wherein the substance (but not the appearances and physical characteristics) of the bread and wine is wholly converted into the substance of Christ's Body and Blood, united to his divine person--impanation maintains that Christ directly unites the substance of the bread and wine to his divine person (or sometimes to his human nature), just as he united his own body and blood to his divine person.[6] They influenced the theology in particular of Honorius Augustodunensis and Gerhoch of Reichersberg.

References[edit]

  • Bernard McGinn, The Growth of Mysticism, (1994), pp328-333
  • John H. van Engen (1983): Rupert of Deutz
  • Meinolf Schumacher (1999): "Rupert von Deutz erzählt eine Fabel. Über Inkonsequenzen in der mittelalterlichen Kritik weltlicher Dichtung", in Poetica 31, p. 81-99

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Rupert von Deutz". Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon. Retrieved March 21, 2013. 
  2. ^ The Latin text is in Rhaban Haacke, MGH, Quellen zur Geistesgeschichte des Mittelalters 4, (Weimar: Böhlaus, 1970).
  3. ^ The Latin text is in Ruperti Tuitiensis. De Gloria et Honore Filii Hominis super Mattheum, ed, Hrabanus Haacke, (CCCM 29), Liber Duodecimus, 363.1-386.876.
  4. ^ The Latin text is in PL 167.
  5. ^ The Latin text is in PL 169.
  6. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "Impanation". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 

External links[edit]