Ruqayyah Ahmed Rufa'i

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Ruqayyah Ahmed Rufa'i
Federal Minister of Education
In office
6 April 2010 – 11 September 2013
Preceded by Sam Egwu
Personal details
Born Ringim, Jigawa State, Nigeria

Professor Ruqayyah Ahmed Rufa'i (born c. 1958) was appointed Nigerian minister of Education on 6 April 2010, when Acting President Goodluck Jonathan announced his new cabinet.[1]

Rufai was born in Ringim in Jigawa State, She obtained a B.Ed in History at the Bayero University, Kano in 1981, an MA in History from the same university in 1987 and PhD in Education from the West Virginia University, USA in 1991. She was Commissioner for Health under the military regime of General Sani Abacha between 1993 and 1996.

She was promoted professor in 2003, and served as Commissioner for Education, Science and Technology in Jigawa State.[1] She said she was always ashamed when faced with the challenge of low enrollment of the girl-child in Jigawa State, and found it difficult to explain why the state could not enroll more girls in the schools.[2] She banned the use of mobile phones in secondary schools due to their distracting influence.[3]

Leaving ministerial office[edit]

Amidst political problem among the ruling party PDP where seven governors, including Sule Lamido of Jigawa State, and dozens of senators and members of House of Representatives split to New PDP, the president Goodluck Ebele Jonathan relieved 9 ministers of their positions. Prof. Ruqayyat was among the affected ministers. [4]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Ruqayyah Ahmed Rufa'i (1995). Gidan Rumfa: The Kano palace. Triumph Publishing. ISBN 978-188-036-8. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Ministers - the Profiles (ii)". ThisDay. 8 April 2010. Retrieved 2010-04-14. 
  2. ^ Ahmed Abubakar. "I’m ashamed, Jigawa can’t enroll enough girls in schools, says commissioner". Peoples's Daily. Retrieved 2010-04-13. 
  3. ^ Ahmed Abubakar. "Jigawa restricts students on use of GSM phones". Peoples's Daily. Retrieved 2010-04-13. 
  4. ^ Jonathan sacks 9 ministers http://www.africanspotlight.com/2013/09/11/jonathan-sacks-9-ministers/