Russell Short

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Russell Short
190411 - Russell Short - 3b - 2012 Team processing.jpg
2012 Australian Paralympic Team portrait of Short
Personal information
Full name Russell Luke Short
Nationality  Australia
Born 7 May 1969
Poowong, Victoria
Height 185 centimetres (73 in)[1]

Russell Luke Short, OAM[2] (born 7 May 1969)[3]is an Australian legally blind athlete, who has competed at seven Paralympics and won six gold, two silver and four bronze medals at the Games. He competes in discus, javelin, and shot put.

Personal[edit]

Russell Luke Short was born on 7 May 1969 in the Victorian town of Poowong.[3][4] He has 2% peripheral vision due to macular degeneration, which first began to affect him at the age of four and a half; his brother also has the disease.[5] He attended Korumburra Secondary College.[4]

In 1993, he kayaked across the Torres Strait from Cape York to New Guinea as part of a team of four men, and also walked the Kokoda Track with them. These experiences were recounted in the 1995 documentary The Blind Leading The Blind and the 2004 book Blind leading the blind : a journey of vision across the Torres Strait and Kokoda track.[6][7]

He lives in the Melbourne suburb of Glen Huntly with his wife, Christine, who is also legally blind, and two sons, Jim and Will.[3][8]He works as a massage therapist.[3]

Career[edit]

Short throwing the discus during discus F12 competition at the 2000 Summer Paralympics. Short won gold in this event.
Short on the medal podium at the 1992 Barcelona Paralympics

Short began his competitive career in 1981.[3] His first Paralympic Games were the 1988 Seoul Paralympics, where he won two gold medals in the Men's Discus B3 and Men's Javelin B3 events, and a bronze medal in the Men's Shot Put B3 event.[9]

In 1988, he became the first disabled person to receive a scholarship from the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS).[10] In 1990, while being coached by AIS Throws Coach Merv Kemp, he broke the discus B2 world record twice.[11] He competed in the 1990 World Championships and Games for the Disabled, Assen, Netherlands winning gold medals in the Men's Shot Put and Discus B3 events.[12]

In the 1992 Barcelona Games, he won two gold medals in the Men's Discus B3 and Men's Shot Put B3 events, for which he received a Medal of the Order of Australia,[2] and a bronze medal in the Men's Javelin B3 event.[9]

In the 1996 Atlanta Games, he won two silver medals in the Men's Discus F12 and Men's Shot Put F12 events.[9] He won two gold medals at the 2000 Sydney Games, setting a world record in the Men's Discus Throw F12 event and a Paralympic Games record in the Men's Shot Put F12 event.[13] In the 2004 Athens Games, he won a bronze medal in the Men's Shot Put F13 event and came fifth in the Men's Discus F12 event.[9][14] Six weeks before winning the bronze medal, he had fallen off a two-meter wall and broken his arm.[15]

Short carried the Australian flag during the opening ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Games.[8] At the Games, he came sixth in the Men's Shot Put F11/12 event.[16] He won a silver medal in the Discus event at the 2011 IPC Athletics World Championships in Christchurch, New Zealand. In a February 2011 interview shortly after the Championships, he said: "Things are starting to fall apart, particularly my shoulder, but with a lot of changes to the way I train and a lot of physio, I'm confident I'll be right".[17]

At the 2012 London Paralympics, Short won a bronze medal in the Men's Shot Put F11/12 event.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Short, Russell". Athletics Australia. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "Short, Russell Luke". It's An Honour. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "Russell Short". Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "Some of our past staff or students and their stories" (PDF). Korumburra Secondary College. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  5. ^ "13 July 2011 Meeting" (PDF). Chadstone / East Malvern Rotary Club. 13 July 2011. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  6. ^ "Blind Leading The Blind (1995)". Screen Australia. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  7. ^ "Blind leading the blind : a journey of vision across the Torres Strait and Kokoda track". National Library of Australia. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  8. ^ a b "Stalwart delighted to fly flag for team". The Australian. 6 September 2008. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  9. ^ a b c d e Russell Short's profile on paralympic.org. Retrieved 6 October 2012.
  10. ^ "Athletes with a Disability". Australian Institute of Sport. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  11. ^ Australian Sports Commission Annual Report 1989-1990 (PDF). Canberra: Australian Sports Commission. p. 40. 
  12. ^ World Championships and Games for the Disabled - Athletics Results. Netherlands: Organising Committee. 1990. 
  13. ^ "Australian Honour Roll". Australian Paralympic Committee Annual Report 2010 (Australian Paralympic Committee): 10. 2010. 
  14. ^ "Men's Discus F12 Results". Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  15. ^ "Gold came with pain". Townsville Bulletin. 23 September 2004. p. 51. 
  16. ^ "Men's Shot Put F11/12 Results". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  17. ^ Eva, Bruce (20 February 2011). "Short still a big shot". The Sunday Age. Retrieved 5 January 2012.