Ryan Mollett

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Not to be confused with Ryan Mallett.
Ryan Mollett
— Lacrosse player —
Born (1978-11-03) November 3, 1978 (age 36)
New York City, New York
Position Defenseman
Height 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight 200 pounds (91 kg)
NCAA team Princeton University
Former MLL teams Rochester Rattlers (20012005)
Chicago Machine (2006)*
New Jersey Pride (20062007)
*appeared in no games
Nationality United States
NLL Draft 22nd overall, 2001
New York Saints
Pro career 2001–2007
Website MLL webpage
Career highlights
College highlights
Professional highlights
Ryan Mollett
Medal record
Competitor for  United States
Lacrosse
World Lacrosse Championship
Gold 2002 Perth Field lacrosse

Ryan DeForest Mollett (born November 3, 1978) is a finance executive and a retired lacrosse defenseman who played professional field lacrosse in Major League Lacrosse (MLL). He starred as a member of the Princeton Tigers men's lacrosse team from 1998 through 2001, where he was the best NCAA lacrosse defenseman in the nation, the Ivy League player of the year, a two-time United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA) All-American (first team once), two-time All-Ivy League first team selection and a member of two national champion teams. During his time at Princeton, the team qualified for the NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship all four years, reached the championship game three times, won the championship game twice and won four Ivy League championships. He was a member of Team USA at the 2002 World Lacrosse Championship. He was the first collegiate player ever drafted in the MLL and became an MLL All-Star player.

Background[edit]

In 1997, Mollett along with teammate John Glatzel led his Boys' Latin School of Maryland lacrosse team to an undefeated season and the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference championship.[1]

College career[edit]

He served as co-captain of the 2001 team that won the 2001 NCAA Division I Men's Lacrosse Championship.[2] Mollett won the 2001 Schmeisser Award as the best National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) lacrosse defenseman.[3] He was the 2001 Men's Ivy League Player of the Year.[4] He was a first team USILA All-American Team selection in 2001 and an honorable mention selection in 2000.[5][6] He was a first team All-Ivy League selection in 2000 and 2001, when he was Ivy League Player of the year.[7][8] During his four-year career, Princeton went undefeated in Ivy League Conference play with consecutive 6–0 records.[7][8][9][10] He was a 2001 USILA Scholar All-American.[3]

Professional career[edit]

In 2001, the Rochester Rattlers selected Mollett as the first player drafted in the first Major League Lacrosse Collegiate Draft.[11] That same year, the New York Saints of the box lacrosse National Lacrosse League made Mollett the 22nd overall selection in the second round of the 2001 NLL draft.[12] He played for the Rattlers from 2001 to 2005.[13] Then, he became a member of the Chicago Machine, but never appeared in a game for them.[13] The Machine had drafted him in the 2006 MLL Expansion Draft, but he requested to be traded.[14] In March 2006, the Machine traded Mollett to the New Jersey Pride.[15] He played with the Pride from 2006 until 2007.[13] In 2003, he was selected as an All-Star.[16]

Mollett represented the United States at the 2002 World Lacrosse Championship where they won the championship.[17] After obtaining his M.B.A. in 2007, he went to work as an associate for BlackRock.[18]

Personal[edit]

Mollet obtained a M.B.A. from Yale School of Management in 2007. That year, his wedding to Glamour magazine fashion editor Samantha Noelle Bishopp was announced in The New York Times.[18] Mollett is the son of Dorothy Mollett and Richard C. Mollett of Taneytown, Maryland.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mills, Keith (2010-03-22). "Anything Is Possible This LAX Season". Press Box. Word Smith Media Ventures, LLC. Retrieved 2010-08-20. 
  2. ^ "Men's Lacrosse". Princeton University. p. 21. Retrieved 2010-08-12. 
  3. ^ a b "Men's Lacrosse". Princeton University. p. 25. Retrieved 2010-08-12. 
  4. ^ "Men's Ivy League Outstanding Performers". IvyLeagueSports.com. Archived from the original on 2007-10-28. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 
  5. ^ "USILA 2000 Division I All-Americans". United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 
  6. ^ "USILA 2001 Division I All-Americans". United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 
  7. ^ a b "2000 Ivy Men's Lacrosse". IvyLeagueSports.com. Archived from the original on 2005-01-22. Retrieved 2010-08-18. 
  8. ^ a b "2001 Ivy Men's Lacrosse". IvyLeagueSports.com. Archived from the original on 2005-01-22. Retrieved 2010-08-18. 
  9. ^ "1998 Ivy Men's Lacrosse". IvyLeagueSports.com. Archived from the original on 2005-01-22. Retrieved 2010-08-17. 
  10. ^ "1999 Ivy Men's Lacrosse". IvyLeagueSports.com. Archived from the original on 2005-01-22. Retrieved 2010-08-18. 
  11. ^ "2009 Major League Lacrosse Media Guide". Major League Lacrosse. p. 105. Retrieved 2010-08-19. 
  12. ^ "Combs Selected By Philadelphia In NLL Draft: Hochstadt traded to Vancouver during draft.". CBS Interactive. 2001-04-27. Retrieved 2010-08-20. 
  13. ^ a b c "2010 Major League Lacrosse Player Encyclopedia". Major League Lacrosse. p. 93. Retrieved 2010-08-19. 
  14. ^ "Chicago Machine Acquires Draft Picks". LaxPower. 2006-04-08. Retrieved 2010-08-20. 
  15. ^ "Transactions". The New York Times. 2006-03-31. Retrieved 2010-08-18. 
  16. ^ "NJ Pride Bolster Defense; Acquire Former Princeton Star Mollett". LaxPower. 2006-04-08. Retrieved 2010-08-20. 
  17. ^ "Ivy Leaguers Help U.S. To World Lax Title". IvyLeagueSports.com. 2002-07-16. Archived from the original on 2005-05-23. Retrieved 2010-08-14. 
  18. ^ a b c "Samantha Bishopp, Ryan Mollett". The New York Times. June 3, 2007. Retrieved August 18, 2010. 
Preceded by
Josh Sims
Ivy League Men's Lacrosse Player of the Year
2001
Succeeded by
Ryan Boyle
Preceded by
Inaugural draft
Major League Lacrosse first overall collegiate draft choice
2001
Succeeded by
Josh Coffman
Preceded by
Marshall Abrams
Schmeisser Award
2001
Succeeded by
John Glatzel

External links[edit]