S.C. Campomaiorense

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S.C. Campomaiorense
S.C. Campomaiorense Logo.png
Full name Sporting Clube Campomaiorense
Nickname(s) Os Galgos (The Greyhounds)
Founded 1 July 1926
Ground Estádio Capitão Cesar Correia,
Campo Maior, Portalegre
Ground Capacity 7500
Chairman João Nabeiro
Manager Luís Maia
League AF Portalegre First Division
2011–12 AF Portalegre First Division, 1st

Sporting Clube Campomaiorense more commonly known as Campomaiorense is a Portuguese football club from Campo Maior, Portalegre District. [1] The club was founded on the 1 July 1926.[2] The club currently plays at the Estádio Capitão Cesar Correia which holds a seating capacity of 7500.[3][4] The club had played in Portugal's top football division, the Primeira Liga for five seasons and reached the 1999 Taça de Portugal final.[5]

Campomaiorense is part of the Portalegre Football Association which is the football association in charge of the Portalegre district's football matters. In its entire history the club has won eight major trophies: the Portuguese Second Division in the 1991–92 season, the Liga de Honra in the 1996–97 season, the AF Portalegre First Division on four occasions (1962–63, 1969–70, 1971–72, 2011–12), the Campeonato de Portalegre in 1946 and the AF Portalegre Supertaça in the 2011–12 season.[6][7]

History[edit]

Campomaiorense was first promoted to the Portuguese Liga in 1995 under the guidance of former Sporting Clube de Portugal star striker Manuel Fernandes.[8] The club was only the third club in the Alentejo region to reach the top division (the two others being Lusitano de Évora in the 1960s and O Elvas in the 1980s). Their spell in the 1995/96 season saw a disappointing campaign, starting the championship with a 7–0 defeat away to Sporting CP and eventually leading to relegation. Further poor results eventually forced club chairman João Manuel Nabeiro to sack Fernandes. New players arrived in mid season, among them Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink, who had just left AZ Alkmaar. Former Portuguese international Diamantino Miranda was given the job with the goal of taking the club back into the first league. Campomaiorense finished at 17th place. The 1996/97 season in the second division earned them a first ever championship title, with former Chaves and Paços de Ferreira striker Rudi being the top goal scorer.[9] Diamantino's season in first division football, however, was no better than Campomaiorense's first spell and he was also sacked by Nabeiro in mid season. Christmas brought coach João Alves (Cup of Portugal winner with Estrela Amadora in 1990) along with Brazilian players in the likes of Isaías (previously with Benfica and Coventry City F.C.) and Demétrios. Alves' efforts earned Campomaiorense the 11th place and another year among the elite. The club underwent an ambitious change of image via a marketing campaign, changing its symbol to the greyhound and the green colors to bordeaux.

Managers seemed to only be fortunate in Campo Maior at the end of the season, and João Alves faith was no different from its predecessors. José Pereira had the honor to lead the team to the Portuguese Cup final in 1999, against SC Beira-Mar. Campomaiorense had benefited from all three major clubs' eliminations: F.C. Porto's shock defeat at third division side S.C.U. Torreense, Sporting's loss to Gil Vicente F.C., and Benfica's to Vitória Setúbal. In the final, people from all over Alentejo descended on Estádio Nacional in Jamor, where a free banquet was offered by millionaire Rui Manuel Nabeiro, father of Campomaiorense chairman João Manuel Nabeiro, whose coffee packaging company Delta Cafés was the club’s main sponsor. However, a late dramatic goal by Porto's on-loan midfielder Ricardo Sousa ended the dream for Campomaiorense.[10]

The club managed to remain in the top division for two more seasons, but following relegation in 2001 and inability to return the following year lead to the decision to abandon professional football.[11] The situation of having more available seats in the stadium than inhabitants in the village was one of the reasons for the club to be considered unworthy of the effort by its sponsors. The club dedicated the next four years to competing only in the youth championships while looking for new talent.[12] In 2006/07, the club was revived and began competing at the regional level. In the 2011–12, Campomaiorense finally won promotion from the district leagues to the Portuguese Third Division, but renounced their participation on the national league.

Honours[edit]

Notable former players[edit]

Past coaches[edit]

League and cup history[edit]

Season Tier Pos. Pl. W D L GS GA Pts Cup Notes
1990–91 3 2 34 21 6 11 53 37 48 Round 3
1991–92 3 1 34 21 6 7 69 27 48 Round 3 Promoted
1992–93 2 15 34 10 5 19 40 53 25 Round 5
1993–94 2 9 34 13 7 14 43 46 33 Round 3
1994–95 2 2 34 19 8 7 58 27 46 Round 4 Promoted
1995–96 1 17 34 10 13 11 32 69 33 Round 6 Relegated
1996–97 2 1 34 18 8 8 51 32 62 Round 4 Promoted
1997–98 1 11 34 11 7 16 53 58 40 Round 4
[A]
1998–99 1 13 34 10 7 17 41 51 37 Runners-up
[B]
1999–00 1 13 34 10 6 18 31 51 36 Round 5
2000–01 1 16 34 7 11 16 29 58 32 Round 4 Relegated
2001–02 2 10 34 13 6 15 48 50 45 Round 4
[C]
2006–07 5 2 26 19 6 2 81 25 62
[D]
2007–08 5 6 28 15 6 7 59 31 51 Round 1
2008–09 5 5 32 17 7 8 58 34 58
2009–10 5 1 12 12 0 0 57 2 36
[E]
2010–11 5 2 16 14 1 1 63 8 43
[F]
2011–12 5 1 28 23 1 4 93 14 70 Promoted
A. ^A Best league classification finish in the club's history.
B. ^B Best cup run in the club's history.
C. ^C The club folded and abandoned the professional football tier.
D. ^D The club was reinstated and began in the AF Portalegre First Division.
E. ^E Reached the playoffs, finished fifth in the final phase.
F. ^F Reached the playoffs, finished second in the final phase.

Last updated: 25 October 2012
Div. = Division; 1 = Portuguese League; 2 = Liga de Honra; 3 = Portuguese Second Division; 5 = AF Portalegre First Division
Pos. = Position; Pl = Match played; W = Win; D = Draw; L = Lost; GS = Goal Scored; GA = Goal Against; P = Points

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Campo Maior". ZeroZero (in Portuguese). Retrieved 25 October 2012. 
  2. ^ "Sporting Clube Campomaiorense". Glorias do Passado (in Portuguese). 20 June 2009. Retrieved 25 October 2012. 
  3. ^ "Capitão César Correia". ZeroZero (in Portuguese). Retrieved 25 October 2012. 
  4. ^ "Capitão César Correia". ForaDeJogo (in Portuguese). Retrieved 25 October 2012. 
  5. ^ "Beira-Mar 1-0 Campomaiorense". ZeroZero (in Portuguese). Retrieved 25 October 2012. 
  6. ^ "AF Portalegre 1ª Divisão 2011/12" [AF Portalegre 1ª Division 2011/12]. ZeroZero (in Portuguese). Retrieved 25 October 2012. 
  7. ^ "AF Portalegre Supertaça Com. Rui Nabeiro 2011/12" [AF Portalegre SuperCup with Rui Nabeiro 2011/12]. ZeroZero (in Portuguese). Retrieved 25 October 2012. 
  8. ^ "2ª Divisão de Honra 1994/1995". ZeroZero (in Portuguese). Retrieved 15 December 2012. 
  9. ^ Portugal – List of Second Division Final Tables The Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 9 August 2010.
  10. ^ 1998–99 Portuguese Cup The Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 9 August 2010.
  11. ^ "Rio Ave-Campomaiorense, 4-2: Autêntico saldo de golos num jogo de fim de estação" [Rio Ave Campomaiorense, 4-2: Authentic balance of goals in a match end of season]. Record (in Portuguese). 6 May 2002. Retrieved 9 November 2012. 
  12. ^ "O novo Campomaiorense" [The new Campomaiorense]. Record (in Portuguese). 25 September 2002. Retrieved 9 November 2012. 

External links[edit]