S. Kent Brown

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Scott Kent Brown (born 1940)[1] is an American professor of ancient scripture and the director of ancient studies at Brigham Young University.

Biography[edit]

Brown received his B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley in classical Greek with a minor in Near Eastern Studies. He then went on to receive his Ph.D. from Brown University. He joined the faculty of BYU in 1971. From 1978-1979 he was a fellow of the American Research Center in Egypt. From 1993-1996 he was the director of the BYU Jerusalem Center, a position he again held from 2009 until August 2010. He has also served as a fellow of the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies.

In the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Brown has served as a bishop among other callings.[2]

Brown served as an editor of the Encyclopedia of Mormonism and as the managing editor of the Coptic Encyclopedia. He has also been an editor of the Journal of Book of Mormon Studies. He also edited the Historical Atlas of Mormonism along with Donald Q. Cannon and Richard H. Jackson.[3]

Brown has written and edited a wide variety of books dealing with Lehi, the Book of Mormon, Judaism between Malachi and the New Testament, the New Testament and Pearl of Great Price.

Brown was a consultant in the production of the film The Prince of Egypt. He was also the Executive Producer and a commentator in the documentaries "Journey of Faith", "Journey of Faith: The New World", and "The Messiah: Behold the Lamb of God".

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ First name from doctoral dissertation entry at Google Books. See: Brown, Scott Kent. "James: A Religio-historical Study of the Relations Between Jewish, Gnostic, and Catholic Christianity in the Early Period Through an Investigation of the Traditions about James the Lord's Brother". Google Book Search. Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  2. ^ See author description in: Brown, S. Kent (October 1988). "Whither the Early Church?". Ensign: 7. Retrieved 2009-05-12. 
  3. ^ "Historical Atlas of Mormonism". Alibris. Retrieved 2009-05-12. 

References[edit]