S1 (classification)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

S1, SB1, SM1 are disability swimming classifications used for categorising swimmers based on their level of disability. The classifications cover athletes with "very severe coordination problems in four limbs or have no use of their legs, trunk, hands and minimal use of their shoulders only".

History[edit]

The classification was created by the International Paralympic Committee and has roots in a 2003 attempt to address "the overall objective to support and co-ordinate the ongoing development of accurate, reliable, consistent and credible sport focused classification systems and their implementation."[1] The Yass Tribune defined this classification in 2007 as "athlete’s with a minimal range of movement and muscular tone".[2] In 1997, Against the odds : New Zealand Paralympians said this classification was graded along a gradient, with S1 being the most disabled and S10 being the least disabled.[3]

Sport[edit]

Visualisation of functional mobility for a S1 competitor

This classification is for swimming.[4] In the classification title, S represents Freestyle, Backstroke and Butterfly strokes. SB means breaststroke. SM means individual medley.[4] Jane Buckley, writing for the Sporting Wheelies, describes the swimmers in this classification as having: "with very severe coordination problems in four limbs or have no use of their legs, trunk, hands and minimal use of their shoulders only. These swimmers usually only swim on their back. Swimmers in this class would usually be wheelchair bound and may be dependent on others for their every day needs."[4] Swimming classifications are on a gradient, with one being the most severely physically impaired to ten having the least amount of physical disability.[5] Swimmers in this classification typically use a wheelchair, swim on their backs, have almost no use of their legs and limited use of their upper body.[6]

Competitions[edit]

For this classification, organisers of the Paralympic Games have the option of including the following events on the Paralympic programme: 50m and 100m Freestyle, 200m Freestyle, 50m Backstroke, 50m Butterfly, 50m Breaststroke and 150m Individual Medley events.[7]

Records[edit]

In the S1 50 m Freestyle Long Course, the men's world record is held by Israel's Itzhak Mamistvalov with a time of 01:04.57 and the women's world record is held by Ukrainian Ganna Ielisavetska with a time of 01:11.73 in 2009.[8] In the S1 100 m Freestyle Long Course, the men's world record is held by Israel's Itzhak Mamistvalov and the women's world record is held by Iryna Sotska.[9]

Getting classified[edit]

In Australia, to be classified in this category, athletes contact the Australian Paralympic Committee or their state swimming governing body.[10] In the United States, classification is handled by the United States Paralympic Committee on a national level. The classification test has three components: "a bench test, a water test, observation during competition."[11] American swimmers are assessed by four people: a medical classified, two general classified and a technical classifier.[11]

Competitors[edit]

American swimmers who have been classified by the United States Paralympic Committee as being in this class include Grover Evans, Jennifer Johnson and Rick Keeton.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Paralympic Classification Today". International Paralympic Committee. 22 April 2010. p. 3. 
  2. ^ "Aaron Rhind sets record straight". Yass Tribune. 2007-10-24. Retrieved 2012-08-01. 
  3. ^ Gray, Alison (1997). Against the odds : New Zealand Paralympians. Auckland, N.Z.: Hodder Moa Beckett. p. 18. ISBN 1869585666. OCLC 154294284. 
  4. ^ a b c Buckley, Jane (2011). "Understanding Classification: A Guide to the Classification Systems used in Paralympic Sports". Retrieved 12 November 2011. 
  5. ^ Shackell, James (2012-07-24). "Paralympic dreams: Croydon Hills teen a hotshot in pool". Maroondah Weekly. Retrieved 2012-08-01. 
  6. ^ "Functional Impairment Classification". Swimming Australia Classification Policy and Procedures. Australia. May 2011. p. 5. Retrieved 22 August 2012. 
  7. ^ "Swimming Classification". The Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad. 2008. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  8. ^ "IPC Swimming World Records Long Course". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  9. ^ "IPC Swimming World Records Long Course". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  10. ^ "Classification Information Sheet". Australian Paralympic Committee. 8 March 2011. p. 3. Retrieved 17 November 2011. 
  11. ^ a b "U.S. Paralympics National Classification Policies & Procedures SWIMMING". United States Paralympic Committee. 26 June 2011. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  12. ^ "USA NATIONAL CLASSIFICATION DATABASE". United States Paralympic Committee. 7 October 2011. Retrieved 18 November 2011.