S2 (classification)

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S2, SB1, SM2 are disability swimming classifications used for categorising swimmers based on their level of disability.

History[edit]

The classification was created by the International Paralympic Committee and has roots in a 2003 attempt to address "the overall objective to support and co-ordinate the ongoing development of accurate, reliable, consistent and credible sport focused classification systems and their implementation."[1]

In 1997, Against the odds : New Zealand Paralympians said this classification was graded along a gradient, with S1 being the most disabled and S10 being the least disabled.[2]

Sport[edit]

Visualisation of functional mobility for a S2 competitor

This classification is for swimming.[3] In the classification title, S represents Freestyle, Backstroke and Butterfly strokes. SB means breaststroke. SM means individual medley.[3] Jane Buckley, writing for the Sporting Wheelies, describes the swimmers in this classification as being: "able to use their arms with no use of their hands, legs or trunk Or have severe coordination problems in four limbs. Similar disabilities to Class 1 but these athletes would have more propulsion by use of their arms or legs."[3] Swimming classifications are on a gradient, with one being the most severely physically impaired to ten having the least amount of physical disability.[4]

Competitions[edit]

For this classification, organisers of the Paralympic Games have the option of including the following events on the Paralympic programme: 50m and 100m Freestyle, 200m Freestyle, 50m Backstroke, 50m Butterfly, 50m Breaststroke and 150m Individual Medley events.[5]

Records[edit]

In the S2 50 m Freestyle Long Course, the men's world record is held by the American Curtis Lovejoy with a time of 01:00.11 and the women's world record is held by the Ukrainian Ganna Ielisavetska with a time of 01:07.15 in 2011.[6] In the S2 100 m Freestyle Long Course, the men's world record is held by American Curtis Lovejoy and the women's world record is held by the Ukrainian Ganna Ielisavetska.[7]

Getting classified[edit]

In Australia, to be classified in this category, athletes contact the Australian Paralympic Committee or their state swimming governing body.[8] In the United States, classification is handled by the United States Paralympic Committee on a national level. The classification test has three components: "a bench test, a water test, observation during competition."[9] American swimmers are assessed by four people: a medical classified, two general classified and a technical classifier.[9]

Competitors[edit]

Swimmers who have competed in this classification include Jim Anderson,[10] Sara Carracelas,[10] Iryna Sotska[10] who all won medals in their class at the 2008 Paralympics.[10]

American swimmers who have been classified by the United States Paralympic Committee as being in this class include Nancy Anderson, Suzanne Collett and Curtis Lovejoy.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Paralympic Classification Today". International Paralympic Committee. 22 April 2010. p. 3. 
  2. ^ Gray, Alison (1997). Against the odds : New Zealand Paralympians. Auckland, N.Z.: Hodder Moa Beckett. p. 18. ISBN 1869585666. OCLC 154294284. 
  3. ^ a b c Buckley, Jane (2011). "Understanding Classification: A Guide to the Classification Systems used in Paralympic Sports". Retrieved 12 November 2011. 
  4. ^ Shackell, James (2012-07-24). "Paralympic dreams: Croydon Hills teen a hotshot in pool". Maroondah Weekly. Retrieved 2012-08-01. 
  5. ^ "Swimming Classification". The Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad. 2008. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  6. ^ "IPC Swimming World Records Long Course". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  7. ^ "IPC Swimming World Records Long Course". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  8. ^ "Classification Information Sheet". Australian Paralympic Committee. 8 March 2011. p. 3. Retrieved 17 November 2011. 
  9. ^ a b "U.S. Paralympics National Classification Policies & Procedures SWIMMING". United States Paralympic Committee. 26 June 2011. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  10. ^ a b c d "Results". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  11. ^ "USA NATIONAL CLASSIFICATION DATABASE". United States Paralympic Committee. 7 October 2011. Retrieved 18 November 2011.