S9 (classification)

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S9, SB8, SM9 are disability swimming classifications used for categorising swimmers based on their level of disability.

History[edit]

The classification was created by the International Paralympic Committee and has roots in a 2003 attempt to address "the overall objective to support and co-ordinate the ongoing development of accurate, reliable, consistent and credible sport focused classification systems and their implementation."[1] In 1997, Against the odds : New Zealand Paralympians said this classification was graded along a gradient, with S1 being the most disabled and S10 being the least disabled. At this time, competitors who were S9 classified tended to be above the elbow or above the knee amputees.[2]

Sport[edit]

This classification is for swimming.[3] In the classification title, S represents Freestyle, Backstroke and Butterfly strokes. SB means breaststroke. SM means individual medley.[3] Jane Buckley, writing for the Sporting Wheelies, describes the swimmers in this classification as having: "severe weakness in one leg only; Swimmers with very slight coordination problems; Swimmers with one limb loss. Unless there is an underlying medical condition usually all of these athletes will start out of the water."[3] Swimming classifications are on a gradient, with one being the most severely physically impaired to ten having the least amount of physical disability.[4]

Competitions[edit]

For this classification, organisers of the Paralympic Games have the option of including the following events on the Paralympic programme: 50m and 100m Freestyle, 400m Freestyle, 100m Backstroke, 100m Butterfly, 100m Breaststroke and 200m Individual Medley events[5]

Records[edit]

In the S9 50 m Freestyle Long Course, the men's world record is held by Australia's Matthew Cowdrey and the women's world record is held by South Africa's Natalie Du Toit.[6] In the S9 100 m Freestyle Long Course, the men's world record is held by Australia's Matthew Cowdrey and the women's world record is held by South Africa's Natalie Du Toit.[7]

Paralympic records[edit]

The table below records the fastest ever Parlaympic record in this class for specific events.

Event Class Time Name Nation Date Games Ref
50 m freestyle S9  25.34  WR
Cowdrey , Matthew John Matthew John Cowdrey Australia Sep 14, 2008 2008 Beijing [8]
100 m freestyle S9  55.30  WR
Cowdrey , Matthew John Matthew John Cowdrey Australia Sep 8, 2008 2008 Beijing [9]
400 m freestyle S9  4:17.02  WR
Collado , Jesus Jesus Collado Spain Sep 12, 2008 2008 Beijing [10]
100 m backstroke S9  1:03.34  WR
Cowdrey , Matthew John Matthew John Cowdrey Australia Sep 13, 2008 2008 Beijing [11]
100 m butterfly S9  59.34  WR
Sors , Tamas Tamas Sors Hungary Sep 7, 2008 2008 Beijing [12]

Legend: # – Record awaiting ratification by IPC; WRWorld record;
Records not set in finals: h – heat; r – relay 1st leg; rh – relay heat 1st leg


Getting classified[edit]

In Australia, to be classified in this category, athletes contact the Australian Paralympic Committee or their state swimming governing body.[13] In the United States, classification is handled by the United States Paralympic Committee on a national level. The classification test has three components: "a bench test, a water test, observation during competition."[14] American swimmers are assessed by four people: a medical classified, two general classified and a technical classifier.[14]

Competitors[edit]

profile of man
S9 classified swimmer Matthew Cowdrey

Swimmers who have competed in this classification include Ellie Cole,[15] Jesus Collado[15] and Matthew Cowdrey[15] who all won medals in their class at the 2008 Paralympics.[15]

American swimmers who have been classified by the United States Paralympic Committee as being in this class include Dana Albrycht, Luis Alicea, Hannah Aspden, Joseph Peppersack, and Staci Perrige.[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Paralympic Classification Today". International Paralympic Committee. 22 April 2010. p. 3. 
  2. ^ Gray, Alison (1997). Against the odds : New Zealand Paralympians. Auckland, N.Z.: Hodder Moa Beckett. p. 18. ISBN 1869585666. OCLC 154294284. 
  3. ^ a b c Buckley, Jane (2011). "Understanding Classification: A Guide to the Classification Systems used in Paralympic Sports". Retrieved 12 November 2011. 
  4. ^ Shackell, James (2012-07-24). "Paralympic dreams: Croydon Hills teen a hotshot in pool". Maroondah Weekly. Retrieved 2012-08-01. 
  5. ^ "Swimming Classification". The Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad. 2008. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  6. ^ "IPC Swimming World Records Long Course". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  7. ^ "IPC Swimming World Records Long Course". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  8. ^ "Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games - Men's 50m freestyle - S9: Results Final" (PDF). BOCOG. 2008-09-14. Retrieved 2008-08-15. 
  9. ^ "Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games - Men's 100m freestyle - S9: Results Final" (PDF). BOCOG. 2008-09-08. Retrieved 2008-09-11. 
  10. ^ "Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games - Men's 400m freestyle - S9: Results Final" (PDF). BOCOG. 2008-09-12. Retrieved 2008-09-12. 
  11. ^ "Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games - Men's 100m backstroke - S9: Results Final" (PDF). BOCOG. 2008-09-13. Retrieved 2008-09-15. 
  12. ^ "Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games - Men's 100m butterfly - S9: Results Final" (PDF). BOCOG. 2008-09-07. Retrieved 2008-09-11. 
  13. ^ "Classification Information Sheet". Australian Paralympic Committee. 8 March 2011. p. 3. Retrieved 17 November 2011. 
  14. ^ a b "U.S. Paralympics National Classification Policies & Procedures SWIMMING". United States Paralympic Committee. 26 June 2011. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  15. ^ a b c d "Results". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  16. ^ "USA NATIONAL CLASSIFICATION DATABASE". United States Paralympic Committee. 7 October 2011. Retrieved 18 November 2011.