SBS World News Channel

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SBS World News Channel
SBSWNC.svg
SBS World News Channel Logo
Launched 12 June 2002
Closed 1 June 2009
Network SBS Television
Owned by Special Broadcasting Service
Picture format 16:9 576i (SDTV)
Country Australia
Website sbs.com.au/digital
Availability
Terrestrial
SD Digital Channel 32[1]
Satellite
Foxtel Channel 648
Austar Channel 610
Cable
Foxtel Channel 648
TransTV Digital Channel 17

The SBS World News Channel was an Australian television channel broadcast by SBS Television that launched on 12 June 2002. The channel, that used to be only available to digital television viewers in Australia, was the first digital-only multi-channel for the Special Broadcasting Service. The news service broadcast for eighteen hours per day, Seven days a week, retransmitting news from fifteen countries. In between news retransmissions, the channel displayed weather information, news headlines, and some commercial advertising.

History[edit]

The SBS World News Channel was officially inaugurated by Minister for Communications, Information Technology and the Arts, Senator Richard Alston on 12 June 2002, with the launch broadcast simultaneously live onto the channel.[2]

It was previously known as The World News in its first year.[3]

Tagalog, Vietnamese, and Arabic language broadcasts were added to SBS' WorldWatch schedule in 2003.[4] The Vietnamese service, taken from the government-controlled channel VTV4, was heavily protested against by the Vietnamese community, many of whom found the bulletin's portrayal of the communist Vietnamese flag and Ho Chi Minh offensive. The Vietnamese Community of Australia, claimed that the program's lack of reports on political arrests and religious oppression were also offensive, especially to those who fled the country following the Vietnam War[5]

The backlash resulting from these events prompted SBS to begin showing disclaimers before all externally produced bulletins, distancing the broadcaster from each bulletin's editorial content.

Genre restrictions imposed by the Australian government on digital multi-channelling were lifted along with the media ownership laws passed through the Australian parliament on 18 October 2006.[6]

Between broadcasts, a commercial for the channel was shown. The dialogue is as follows:

The SBS World News Channel delivered more than 200 news programs from around the globe each week, providing an up to date and varied perspective on the headlines of the day. Each bulletin is in the language and format of the country of origin. From 6:00am Monday to Sunday, continuous telecasts from international broadcasters via satellite from some of the most respected news bureaus of the world, news reviews and magazine style information programmes. The most comprehensive international news channel in the world, with unparalleled access to continuing news and current affairs from 17 countries in languages other than English. Available only on the SBS World News Channel.

The channel was set up as an experimental full service channel.[7]

Programming[edit]

The SBS World News Channel broadcast for 24 hours each day, retransmitting over two-hundred news programs per week, from twenty-three countries. The channel's programming line-up consisted of retransmissions of bulletins from news services throughout the world, including:

These programs are also presented on SBS TV, along with PBS's Nightly Business Report and PBS NewsHour, SBS TV broadcasts World News Australia, and the English version of Deutsche Welle's bulletin.

earthTV[edit]

earthTV was broadcast on the SBS World News Channel when news programs are broadcast. It also acted as a filler when news programs are delayed.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ SBS — Australia-wide Digital Upgrade
  2. ^ "SBS launches World News Channel". dba.org.au. August 2002. Retrieved 2007-10-12. 
  3. ^ INQUIRY INTO THE UPTAKE OF DIGITAL TELEVISION
  4. ^ "SBS Timeline". Special Broadcasting Service. Archived from the original on 2007-03-02. Retrieved 2007-05-20. 
  5. ^ "Crunch time for SBS over Vietnamese news bulletin". Sydney Morning Herald. 2003-12-02. Retrieved 2007-05-20. 
  6. ^ Day, Julia (2006-10-18). "Australia opens up media investment". MediaGuardian.co.uk (London: guardian.co.uk). Retrieved 2007-03-31. 
  7. ^ "INQUIRY INTO THE UPTAKE OF DIGITAL TELEVISION". http://www.aph.gov.au. http://www.aph.gov.au. p. 11. Retrieved 2009-03-24. 

References[edit]

External links[edit]