SEAT Córdoba

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SEAT Córdoba
Seat Cordoba front 20081125.jpg
1999 SEAT Córdoba Mk1 facelift
Overview
Manufacturer SEAT
Production 1993–2009
Body and chassis
Class Supermini
Platform Volkswagen Group A0 series
Chronology
Predecessor SEAT Málaga
Successor SEAT Ibiza ST (wagon)

The SEAT Córdoba was the saloon, estate and coupé version of the SEAT Ibiza supermini car, built by the Spanish automaker SEAT. It was manufactured between 1993 and 2009, and was related with the second and third generations of the Ibiza.

First generation (Typ 6K; 1993–2002)[edit]

SEAT Córdoba Mk1 (6K)
Seat Cordoba front 20080328.jpg
1993 SEAT Córdoba Mk1 pre-facelift
Overview
Production 1993–2002
Assembly Martorell, Spain
Pacheco, Argentina
Designer Giorgetto Giugiaro
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door coupé
4-door saloon
5-door estate
Platform Volkswagen Group A03
Related SEAT Ibiza Mk2
Volkswagen Derby
Volkswagen Polo Classic
Volkswagen Polo Mk3
Volkswagen Golf Mk3
Volkswagen Vento
Powertrain
Engine 1.4 L I4 (petrol)
1.4 L I4 16V (petrol)
1.6 L I4 (petrol)
1.8 L I4 (petrol)
1.8 L I4 16V (petrol)
2.0 L I4 (petrol)
2.0 L I4 16V (petrol)
1.9 L I4 D (diesel)
1.9 L I4 TD (diesel)
1.9 L I4 SDI (diesel)
1.9 L I4 TDI (diesel)
Dimensions
Wheelbase 2,440 mm (96 in)
Length 4,109 mm (161.8 in)
Width 1,640 mm (65 in)
Height 1,408 mm (55.4 in)
Curb weight 990 kg (2,180 lb)
SEAT Córdoba Mk1 pre-facelift
SEAT Córdoba SX coupé pre-facelift
SEAT Córdoba Vario estate

The first generation Córdoba was presented at the 1993 Frankfurt Motor Show, and launched in the summer of the same year, penned by Italian designer Giorgetto Giugiaro and based on the chassis of the SEAT Ibiza Mk2 which would spawn the Volkswagen Polo Mk3 the following year.[citation needed]

Its 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0-litre petrol engines were also found in the Volkswagen Polo and Ibiza, as was the 1.9 TDI.[citation needed]

Though based on the Polo and Ibiza, its extended rear overhang meant its length was close to a Golf but still smaller than the Jetta. It featured a boot space of 455 litres (16.1 cu ft) which could be extended up to 762 litres (26.9 cu ft) by folding rear seats.[1]

Variants[edit]

In 1996, the Córdoba range was extended with a coupé (Córdoba SX), and in 1998, with an estate (Córdoba Vario).[2]

The Córdoba SX was a two-door coupé version of the Córdoba. It came with five engine variants: 1.6-litre 100 bhp (75 kW; 101 PS), 1.9-litre turbodiesel, a 1.8-litre 16 valve, 2.0-litre 8 valve (Cupra), which was also used in the Córdoba GTi, and a 2.0-litre 16 valve.[2] The 2.0 litre engines was identical to the engines used in the third generation Golf GTi.[citation needed] The 2.0-litre 16 valve Córdoba SX also came with 16-inch multispoke alloys, 280 mm (11.0 in) front discs, ABS, traction control and air conditioning as standard.[citation needed] The model was slightly revised in 1996, with a new rear splitter which required the exhaust to be hidden, a revised front lower grill and splitter, and the leather interior which became standard.[citation needed]

The Córdoba 16V was £1,000 more expensive[clarification needed] at list and one second slower from 0 to 60 mph because of the added weight of the rear end.[citation needed]

SEAT Córdoba Mk1 facelift
Daniel Solà with the SEAT Córdoba WRC at the Rallye de tierra de Cangas del Narcea

Facelift[edit]

In 1999, the Córdoba was facelifted with changes focusing on the bumpers, headlights, taillights and front grille,[2] as well as in the interior, with new materials and upholstery.[citation needed] In the engine range, the 16 valve ABF engine was replaced with a 1.8 156 bhp (116 kW; 158 PS) Turbo engine and joined the Cupra range.[2] The SX was no longer available in the United Kingdom, and limited numbers are known to exist in the Republic of Ireland in RHD format.[clarification needed] The estate variant "Córdoba Vario" dropped the "Cordóba" and now simply used the nameplate "Vario".[citation needed]

Motorsport[edit]

The Córdoba WRC was SEAT's official rally car in the World Rally Championship from 1998 to 2000. It featured a 2.0-litre turbocharged engine. The Córdoba WRC competed in the top category of the championship, as SEAT had homologated a World Rally Car version of the Córdoba 16v for competition in the FIA World Rally Championship and other international rallies.[clarification needed] 1994 World Drivers' Champion Didier Auriol, of France, and Toni Gardemeister and Harri Rovanpera, both of Finland, were among those to drive the factory cars.[citation needed]

It made its debut at the 1998 Rally Finland, with Harri Rovanperaas the main driver, and achieved podiums at the 1999 Rally New Zealand, driven by Toni Gardemeister, the 1999 Rally of Great Britain, driven by Rovanpera, as well as in the 2000 Safari Rally, driven by Didier Auriol.[citation needed] The works programme concluded at the end of the 2000 season with the third evolution of the rally car.[citation needed] However the Córdoba WRC continued to compete with successful results in national championships in different countries.[citation needed] In Spain, the Córdoba won the national title of all the rallies on gravel with Pedro Diego and Marc Blázquez, and wins in tarmac rallies with Salvador Cañellas Jr.[citation needed]

Rebadged versions[edit]

Volkswagen Derby, a rebadged SEAT Córdoba Mk1

The contemporary Volkswagen Polo Classic (saloon) and Variant (estate) were rebadged versions of the SEAT Córdoba Mk1 and Córdoba Vario respectively, and were not based on the Volkswagen Polo hatchback.[citation needed]

FAW-Volkswagen, Volkswagen's Chinese partner, manufactured the Córdoba Mk1 under the Volkswagen Citi-Golf name between 1997 and 2002.[3] The Citi-Golf had the Córdoba rear and front design (not the European or South American versions), which helped distinguish the Córdoba from the Polo Classic models.[citation needed]

In Mexico it was rebadged as the Volkswagen Derby. In 1995, it was imported from Spain,[citation needed] but the 1996 model was assembled in the Volkswagen de México assembly plant in Puebla, Mexico.[citation needed] In 1998, the Spanish made Polo Classic was introduced in Mexico as the new Volkswagen Derby.[citation needed]

Engines[edit]

Engine Code Type Displacement Max. power at rpm Max. torque at rpm Top speed Years Coupé Saloon Estate
Petrol engines
1.4 i ABD I4 SOHC 8V 1,391 cc 60 PS (44 kW; 59 hp) at 5,200 107 N·m (79 lb·ft) at 2,400–2,800 145 km/h (90.1 mph) 1993–1995 Red XN Green tickY Red XN
1.4 MPI AEX/APQ I4 SOHC 8V 1,390 cc 60 PS (44 kW; 59 hp) at 4,700 116 N·m (86 lb·ft) at 2,800–3,200 145 km/h (90.1 mph) 1995–1999 Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
1.4 MPI AFH I4 DOHC 16V 1,390 cc 100 PS (74 kW; 99 hp) at 6,000 128 N·m (94 lb·ft) at 4,400 165 km/h (102.5 mph) 1996–1999 Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
1.6 i ABU I4 SOHC 8V 1,598 cc 75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp) at 5,200 125 N·m (92 lb·ft) at 3,400 155 km/h (96.3 mph) 1993–1994 Red XN Green tickY Red XN
1.6 i 1F I4 SOHC 8V 1,595 cc 75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp) at 5,500 125 N·m (92 lb·ft) at 2,600 155 km/h (96.3 mph) 1994–1997 Green tickY Green tickY Red XN
1.6 MPI AEE I4 SOHC 8V 1,598 cc 75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp) at 4,800 135 N·m (100 lb·ft) at 2,800–3,600 155 km/h (96.3 mph) 1997–1999 Red XN Green tickY Green tickY
1.6 MPI AFT/AKS I4 SOHC 8V 1,595 cc 101 PS (74 kW; 100 hp) at 5,800 140 N·m (103 lb·ft) at 3,500 165 km/h (102.5 mph) 1996–1999 Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
1.8 i ABS/ADZ I4 SOHC 8V 1,781 cc 90 PS (66 kW; 89 hp) at 5,500 145 N·m (107 lb·ft) at 2,700–2,900 160 km/h (99.4 mph) 1993–1996 Green tickY Green tickY Red XN
1.8 MPI ADL I4 DOHC 16V 1,781 cc 130 PS (96 kW; 128 hp) at 6,000 165 N·m (122 lb·ft) at 4,800 195 km/h (121.2 mph) 1994–1996 Green tickY Green tickY Red XN
2.0 MPI 2E/AGG I4 SOHC 8V 1,984 cc 116 PS (85 kW; 114 hp) at 5,400 165 N·m (122 lb·ft) at 3,200 (2E)/2,600 (AGG) 185 km/h (115.0 mph) 1993–1999 Green tickY Green tickY Red XN
2.0 MPI ABF I4 DOHC 16V 1,984 cc 150 PS (110 kW; 148 hp) at 6,000 180 N·m (133 lb·ft) at 4,200–5,000 210 km/h (130.5 mph) 1996–1999 Green tickY Green tickY Red XN
Diesel engines
1.9 D 1Y I4 SOHC 8V 1,896 cc 64 PS (47 kW; 63 hp) at 4,400 124 N·m (91 lb·ft) at 2,000–3,000 150 km/h (93.2 mph) 1993–1999 Green tickY Green tickY Red XN
1.9 TD AAZ I4 SOHC 8V 1,896 cc 75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp) at 4,200 150 N·m (111 lb·ft) at 2,400–3,400 155 km/h (96.3 mph) 1993–1996 Green tickY Green tickY Red XN
1.9 SDI AEY I4 SOHC 8V 1,896 cc 64 PS (47 kW; 63 hp) at 4,200 125 N·m (92 lb·ft) at 2,200–2,800 150 km/h (93.2 mph) 1996–1999 Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
1.9 TDI 1Z/AHU I4 SOHC 8V 1,896 cc 90 PS (66 kW; 89 hp) at 4,000 202 N·m (149 lb·ft) at 1,900 160 km/h (99.4 mph) 1996–1999 Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY
1.9 TDI AFN/AVG I4 SOHC 8V 1,896 cc 110 PS (81 kW; 108 hp) at 4,150 235 N·m (173 lb·ft) at 1,900 175 km/h (108.7 mph) 1996–1999 Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY

Second generation (Typ 6L; 2002–2009)[edit]

SEAT Córdoba Mk2 (6L)
Seat Cordoba front 20080326.jpg
Overview
Production 2002–2009
Designer Walter de'Silva
Body and chassis
Body style 4-door saloon
Platform Volkswagen Group A04 (PQ24)
Related SEAT Ibiza Mk3
Volkswagen Polo Mk4
Škoda Fabia Mk1
Škoda Fabia Mk2
Powertrain
Engine 1.2 L I3 12v (petrol)
1.4 L I4 16v (petrol)
1.6 L I4 8v (petrol)
1.6 L I4 16v (petrol)
2.0 L I4 8v (petrol)
1.4 L I3 TDI (diesel)
1.9 L I4 SDI (diesel)
1.9 L I4 TDI (diesel)
Dimensions
Wheelbase 2,460 mm (96.9 in)
Length 4,280 mm (168.5 in)
Width 1,698 mm (66.9 in)
Height 1,441 mm (56.7 in)
Curb weight 1,260 kg (2,780 lb)
Seat Cordoba rear

The second generation Córdoba was presented at the 2002 Paris Motor Show as the four-door saloon version of the SEAT Ibiza Mk3 hatchback, featuring a boot capacity of 485 litres (17.1 cu ft), which could be increased to 800 litres (28 cu ft) by folding the rear seats.[4][5] No estate or coupé versions of the second generation were developed. The Córdoba Mk2 shares its chassis and engines with the Volkswagen Polo Mk4 and Škoda Fabia Mk1 and Mk2.[citation needed]

In Mexico, Córdoba production continues in the Volkswagen de México Puebla assembly plant.[year needed] It has the four-cylinder 2.0-litre 115 bhp (86 kW; 117 PS) engine combined with a 5-speed manual or an optional 6-speed Tiptronic transmission.[citation needed]

Saloons based on successful hatchbacks rarely become a sales success in Europe, and the SEAT Córdoba has done little to change that. It is to Seat what the Jetta and Vento were to Volkswagen and what the Belmont was to Vauxhall.

During 2006, the Córdoba was withdrawn from sale in the United Kingdom, and shortly was removed from SEAT UK's official website. In other European countries, sales ended in 2009.

Engines[edit]

Model Engine code Max. power Dates
Petrol engines
1.2 12V AZQ/BME 64 hp (48 kW; 65 PS) 10/02-06/06
1.2 12V BXV 69 hp (51 kW; 70 PS) 05/06-11/09
1.4 16V BBY/BKY 75 hp (56 kW; 76 PS) 09/02-12/07
1.4 16V BXW 86 hp (64 kW; 87 PS) 05/06-11/09
1.4 16V BBZ 100 hp (75 kW; 101 PS) 10/02-11/09
1.6 8V BAH 100 hp (75 kW; 101 PS) 04/03-11/09
1.6 16V BTS 105 hp (78 kW; 106 PS) 11/06-11/09
2.0 8V AZL/BBX 115 hp (86 kW; 117 PS) 09/02-11/09
Diesel engines
1.4 TDI BNM 68 hp (51 kW; 69 PS) 05/05-11/09
1.4 TDI AMF 75 hp (56 kW; 76 PS) 10/02-12/05
1.4 TDI BMS/BNV 80 hp (60 kW; 81 PS) 05/05-11/09
1.9 SDI ASY 64 hp (48 kW; 65 PS) 09/02-12/05
1.9 TDI ATD/AXR/BMT 100 hp (75 kW; 101 PS) 09/02-11/09
1.9 TDI ASZ/BLT 131 hp (98 kW; 133 PS) 10/02-07/09

Sales and production figures[edit]

The total production per year of SEAT Córdoba cars, manufactured in SEAT and other Volkswagen group's plants, is shown in the following table:

Model 1998[6] 1999[6] 2000[7] 2001[8] 2002[9] 2003[10] 2004[11] 2005[12] 2006[13] 2007[14] 2008[15] 2009[16]
Total annual production 108,749 111,894 97,685 78,770 58,646 59,348 46,821 37,568 31,058 29,747 20,439 4,861

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Seat Cordoba specifications". HobbyAutos.com. Retrieved 19 June 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Auto Specificaties - Seat". Autotrader.nl. Retrieved 19 June 2011. 
  3. ^ "Volkswagen City-Golf". Histomobile.com. Retrieved 25 September 2010. 
  4. ^ "Seat revealed the new Seat Cordoba at Paris Motor Show". Car.kak.net. 26 September 2002. Retrieved 19 June 2011. 
  5. ^ "Grossansicht Seite 5 von Seat Cordoba Preisliste" (in German). Produkte24.com. Retrieved 19 June 2011. 
  6. ^ a b "Volkswagen AG Annual Report 1999". Volkswagen AG. 27 May 2003. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  7. ^ "Volkswagen AG Annual Report 2000". Volkswagen AG. 27 May 2003. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  8. ^ "Volkswagen AG Annual Report 2001". Volkswagen AG. 27 May 2003. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  9. ^ "Volkswagen AG Annual Report 2002". Volkswagen AG. 27 May 2003. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  10. ^ "Volkswagen AG Annual Report 2003". Volkswagen AG. 9 March 2004. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  11. ^ "Volkswagen AG Annual Report 2004". Volkswagen AG. 4 March 2005. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  12. ^ "Volkswagen AG Annual Report 2005". Volkswagen AG. 1 March 2006. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  13. ^ "Volkswagen AG Annual Report 2006". Volkswagen AG. 8 March 2007. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  14. ^ "Volkswagen AG Annual Report 2007". Volkswagen AG. 10 March 2008. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  15. ^ "Volkswagen AG Annual Report 2008". Volkswagen AG. 7 April 2009. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 
  16. ^ "Volkswagen AG Annual Report 2009". Volkswagen AG. 22 March 2010. Retrieved 16 September 2010. 

External links[edit]