SETA Corporation

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SETA Corporation
Former type Public
Industry Computer and video game industry
Founded October 1, 1985
Defunct January 23, 2009
Headquarters Kōtō, Tokyo, Japan
Website http://web.archive.org/web/20080508011436/http://www.seta.co.jp/index.htm

SETA Corporation (株式会社セタ Kabushiki-Gaisha Seta) (Full company name Super Entertainment and Total Amusement) was a Japanese computer gaming company, founded on October 1, 1985 [1] and dissolved on January 23, 2009. Seta was headquartered in Kōtō, Tokyo.[2] The American branch of Seta was located in Las Vegas, Nevada.[3]

As a video game publisher, it made games for the Nintendo Entertainment System, the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, and various other systems. It made games in North America but mainly Japan (specialising in golf and puzzle titles). SETA also developed the arcade system, the Aleck 64 which was based on N64 architecture. Also, SETA co-developed the SSV (Sammy, SETA, Visco) system.

On December 2008, parent company Aruze announced that Seta decided to close shop after 23 years of existence:

"Based on the deterioration of economic conditions within Japan as caused by the current international financial crisis, Seta came to the conclusion that the continuation of its business on its own would be difficult, and thereby resolved its dissolution and liquidation." [4]

Published video games[edit]

Nintendo Entertainment System[edit]

Game Boy[edit]

Super Nintendo Entertainment System/Super Famicom[edit]

Nintendo 64[edit]

Nintendo GameCube[edit]

Xbox 360[edit]

M65C02[edit]

Aleck 64 (arcade)[edit]

Released[edit]

Unreleased[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eric Caoili; John Andersen, Staff (2009-01-21). "Veteran Japanese Studio Seta Closes Doors". Gamasutra. Retrieved 2009-01-23. 
  2. ^ "Corporation Data." Seta Corporation. February 6, 2007. Retrieved on April 24, 2009.
  3. ^ "[1]." Seta USA. Retrieved on November 11, 2011.
  4. ^ Caoili, Erick, John Andersen, Staff. "Veteran Japanese Studio Seta Closes Doors." Gamasutra. January 21, 2009. Retrieved on October 5, 2009.
  5. ^ "Bio Force Ape". Nintendo Power. August 1991. 
  6. ^ Nintendo Power. April 1992. 
  7. ^ "A website about unreleased video games". Lost Levels. 2010-04-02. Retrieved 2014-06-16. 

External links[edit]