SM U-24

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For other ships of the same name, see German submarine U-24.
Career (German Empire)
Name: U-24
Ordered: 18 March 1911
Builder: Germaniawerft, Kiel
Laid down: 5 February 1912
Launched: 24 May 1913
Commissioned: 6 December 1913
Fate: Surrendered, 22 November 1918
Broken up, 1922
General characteristics [1]
Type: German Type U 23 submarine
Displacement: 685 long tons (696 t) surfaced
878 long tons (892 t) submerged
Length: 64.70 m (212 ft 3 in)
Draft: 3.56 m (11 ft 8 in)
Speed: 16.4 knots (30.4 km/h; 18.9 mph) surfaced
9.7 knots (18.0 km/h; 11.2 mph) submerged
Test depth: about 50 m (160 ft)
Armament: 105 mm (4.1 in) deck gun, 300 rounds
four 50 cm (20 in)[2] torpedo tubes (2 bow, 2 stern; 6 torpedoes
Service record
Part of: Imperial German Navy, III Flotilla
Commanders: Rudolf Schneider
(1 August 1914-3 June 1916)
Walter Remy
(4 June 1916-10 July 1917)
Otto von Schubert
(11 July 1917-1 August 1917)

SM U-24 was one of 329 submarines serving in the Imperial German Navy in World War I. She was engaged in commerce warfare during the First Battle of the Atlantic.

In seven patrols, U-24 sank a total of 34 ships totalling 106,103 tons, damaged three more for 14,318 tons, and took one prize of 1,925 tons.[3]

Her second kill was the most significant. The victim was HMS Formidable, torpedoed 30 nautical miles (56 km; 35 mi) south of Lyme Regis, at 50.13N 03.04W. She was hit in the number one boiler room on the port side. Out of a crew of approximately 711 men, 547 died as a result. This was one of the largest ships sunk by U-boats during the war.[4]

In 1915, U-24 claimed another noted victim, the passenger steamer Arabic, causing 44 deaths, including three Americans. Arabic sank in 10 minutes. This escalated the U-boat fear in the U.S. and caused a diplomatic incident which resulted in the suspension of torpedoing non-military ships without notice.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur (2012). "Type U-23 boats". uboat.net. Retrieved 4 November 2012. 
  2. ^ Fitzsimons, Bernard, ed. "U-Boats (1905-18)", in The Illustrated Encyclopedia of 20th Century Weapons and Warfare (Phoebus Publishing, 1978), Volume 23, p.2534.
  3. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur (2012). "SM U-24". uboat.net. Retrieved 4 November 2012. 
  4. ^ Rickard, J. (1 November 2007). "HMS Formidable". historyofwar.org. Retrieved 4 November 2012. 
  5. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur (2012). "3. Escalation - The U-boat War in World War One". uboat.net. Retrieved 4 November 2012.