SM U-33 (Germany)

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For other ships of the same name, see German submarine U-33.
Career (German Empire)
Name: U-33
Ordered: 29 March 1912
Builder: Germaniawerft, Kiel
Laid down: 7 November 1912
Launched: 19 May 1914
Commissioned: 27 September 1914
Fate: Surrendered at the end of the war broken up at Blyth in 1919-20
General characteristics
Class & type: German Type U 31 submarine
Displacement: 685 tons surfaced
878 tons submerged
971 tons (total)
Length: 64.70 m (overall)
52.36 m (pressure hull)
Beam: 6.32 m (overall)
4.05 m (pressure hull)
Height: 7.68 m
Draught: 3.56 m
Propulsion: Diesel (2 x 950 PS)
Electric (2 x 600 PS)
1850 hp surfaced
1200 hp submerged
Speed: 16.4 knots surfaced
9.7 knots submerged
Range: 8790 miles at 8 kn surfaced 80 miles at 5 knsubmerged[1]
Test depth: 50 m
Complement: 4 officers
31 crewmen
Armament:
Service record
Part of: Imperial German Navy
Commanders:

27 Sep 1914 - 23 Sep 1916 - Konrad Gansser[4]
24 Sep 1916 - 1 Apr 1917 - Gustav Sieß[4]

2 Apr 1917 - 30 Nov 1918 - Hellmuth von Doemming[4]
Victories:

82 ships sunk for a total of 193.529 tons.
8 ships damaged for a total of 36.452 tons.

1 ship taken as prize for a total of 453 tons.

SM U-33 was a German Type U 31 U-boat of the Imperial German Navy.

SS Brussels[edit]

On 28 March 1915, U-33 ordered the Great Eastern Railway's SS Brussels to stop.[5] Instead of stopping, her captain, Charles Fryatt ordered full steam ahead and attempted to ram U-33, which only just managed to dive in time.[6]

Sinking of hospital ship[edit]

On March 30,[7] 1916 the Russian hospital ship Portugal was towing a string of small flat-bottomed boats to ferry wounded from the shore to the ship. Off Rizeh, on the Turkish coast of the Black Sea she had stopped as one of the small boats was sinking and repairs were being made. The ship was not carrying wounded at the time, but had a staff of Red Cross workers on board, as well as her usual crew.[8] | The ship's crew saw a periscope approaching the vessel but as the ship was a hospital ship and protected by the Hague conventions no evasive actions were taken. Without warning SM U-33 fired a torpedo which missed. The submarine came around again fired a torpedo from a depth of 30 feet, which hit near the engine room, breaking the ship into two pieces.[8] Of 273 persons on board, 158 were rescued.[9]

Operations[edit]

SM U-33 Kptlt Gausser till Autumn 1917, then to U-156; next C.O. probably Kptlt Siess. Came off the stocks at Kiel about the end of November 1914, and joined the Kiel School for trials, proceeding to Emden on 12 January 1915. She was attached to the 4th Half Flotilla.[10]

24–25 January 1915. On Bight patrol to an area where enemy battle cruisers were reported.[10]

30 January 1915 ? Special anti-submarine patrol. Returned owing to engine trouble.[10]

? 18–20 February 1915. Bight patrol.[10]

21 February - ? 22 February 1915. Bight patrol.[10]

27 February - 10 April 1915. Through Channel to Atlantic. 2 S.S., 2 sailing vessels sunk.[10]

29–30 May 1915. North Sea returned owing to defective W/T.[10]

4–24 June 1915. Northabout to west coast of Scotland. Sank 2 S.S., 1 prize.[10]

14–17 August 1915. Bight Anti-air raid patrol.[10]

28 August - 15 September 1915. To Mediterranean northabout. Sank 5 S.S. Arrived Cattaro about 15 September and joined the Constantinople Half Flot.[10]

28 September - 9 October 1915. Cruise in eastern Mediterranean. Sank 10 S.S.[10]

16 November - 6 December 1915. Cruise in central Mediterranean. Sank 13 S.S. On 5 December was in action with drifter HOLLIBANK in the Straits of Otranto. Took prisoner Capt Wilson, King’s messenger.[10]

April 1916 - November 1916. U-33 was operating chiefly in the eastern Black Sea and was based on Constantinople or Varna. By April 1917 she was back in the Adriatic.[10]

12 January - 10 February 1918. Left Cattaro and operated in eastern Mediterranean. Sank 2. S.S., 2 sailing vessels, and damaged but did not sink 2 S.S.[10]

1–17 May 1918. Left Cattaro for the east, and on 7 May was in area off Port Said. Sank 1 S.S., 1 sailing vessel, and attacked 2 ships and a convoy unsuccessfully. On May 8 was in action, and on 15 May broke off undertaking owing to defects.[10]

2 September to about 26 September. Left Cattaro for the east. Sank 1 S.S., 12 sailing vessels.[10]

On 19 October 1918. U-33 left Cattaro for Kiel. The only incident of the voyage was that she was attacked by a trawler on 1 November in about 36°35'E. She steered northabout and by the Sound, at some time with UB-51 and UB-105.[10]

Surrendered at Harwich January 16, 1919.[10]

Summary of Raiding Career[edit]

Date Name Nationality Tonnage
(GRT)
Fate[11]
2 April 1915 Paquerette  France 399 Sunk
4 April 1915 Hermes  Russian Empire 1,019 Sunk
4 April 1915 Olivine  United Kingdom 634 Sunk
5 April 1915 Northlands  United Kingdom 2,776 Sunk
10 June 1915 Dania  Russian Empire 2,648 Sunk
14 June 1915 Davanger  Norway 2,256 Sunk
21 June 1915 Sigurd Hund  Norway 453 Captured as a prize
1 September 1915 Whitefield  United Kingdom 2,422 Sunk
4 September 1915 Cymbeline  United Kingdom 4,505 Sunk
4 September 1915 Glimt  Norway 955 Sunk
4 September 1915 Mimosa  United Kingdom 3,466 Sunk
4 September 1915 Storesand  Norway 1,639 Sunk
6 September 1915 John Hardie  United Kingdom 4,372 Sunk
30 September 1915 Tobia  Kingdom of Italy 185 Sunk
1 October 1915 Provincia  France 3,523 Sunk
2 October 1915 Arabian  United Kingdom 2,744 Sunk
2 October 1915 Sainte Marguerite  France 3,908 Sunk
3 October 1915 Antonie  France 2,698 Sunk
4 October 1915 Craigston  United Kingdom 2,617 Sunk
4 October 1915 Yunnan  France 6,474 Damaged
5 October 1915 Burrsfield  United Kingdom 4,037 Sunk
5 October 1915 X130  United Kingdom 160 Sunk
6 October 1915 Dimitrios  Greece 2,508 Sunk
6 October 1915 Scawby  United Kingdom 3,658 Sunk
6 October 1915 Silverash  United Kingdom 3,753 Sunk
7 October 1915 Amiral Hamelin  France 5,051 Sunk
18 November 1915 Enosis  United Kingdom 3,409 Sunk
19 November 1915 Senju Maru  Japan 4,340 Sunk
20 November 1915 Merganser  United Kingdom 1,905 Sunk
23 November 1915 Tafna  France 1,444 Damaged
24 November 1915 Liguria  Kingdom of Italy 3,199 Sunk
25 November 1915 Algerien  France 1,767 Sunk
26 November 1915 Tringa  United Kingdom 2,154 Sunk
27 November 1915 Kingsway  United Kingdom 3,647 Sunk
27 November 1915 Omara  France 435 Sunk
27 November 1915 Tanis  United Kingdom 3,655 Sunk
29 November 1915 Malinche  United Kingdom 1,868 Sunk
29 November 1915 Zarifis  Greece 2,904 Sunk
30 November 1915 Colenso  United Kingdom 3,861 Sunk
30 November 1915 Langton Hall  United Kingdom 4,437 Sunk
1 December 1915 Clan Macleod  United Kingdom 4,796 Sunk
1 December 1915 Umeta  United Kingdom 5,312 Sunk
2 December 1915 Commodore  United Kingdom 5,858 Sunk
30 March 1916 Portugal  Imperial Russian Navy 5,358 Sunk
31 March 1916 Roi Albert  Belgium 2,853 Damaged
31 March 1916 Unidentified Sailing Vessel  Russian Empire 7 Sunk
3 April 1916 Enrichetta  Russian Empire 442 Sunk
28 April 1916 Lyusya  Russian Empire 50 Sunk
28 April 1916 Anzhelika  Russian Empire 170 Sunk
28 April 1916 Unidentified sailing vessel  Russian Empire 300 Sunk
18 September 1916 Unidentified Small Fishing Vessel (1 of 2)  Russian Empire unknown Sunk
18 September 1916 Unidentified Small Fishing Vessel (2 of 2)  Russian Empire unknown Sunk
15 April 1917 Cameronia  United Kingdom 10,963 Sunk
16 April 1917 Sontay  France 7,247 Sunk
22 April 1917 Blaatind  Norway 1,641 Sunk
22 April 1917 Maria S.  Kingdom of Italy 133 Sunk
22 April 1917 Unione  Kingdom of Italy 207 Sunk
26 April 1917 Monitor  United Kingdom 138 Sunk
27 April 1917 Mafalda  Kingdom of Italy 162 Sunk
27 April 1917 Margaret B. Rouss  United States 701 Sunk
28 April 1917 Lisetta  Kingdom of Italy 40 Sunk
30 April 1917 Chrisomalli Th. Sifneo  Greece 2,415 Sunk
27 May 1917 Beatrice  Kingdom of Italy 106 Sunk
27 May 1917 Michele Costantino  Kingdom of Italy 51 Sunk
3 June 1917 Greenbank  United Kingdom 3,881 Sunk
3 June 1917 Islandmore  United Kingdom 3,046 Sunk
7 June 1917 Il Dionisio  Kingdom of Italy 97 Sunk
7 June 1917 San Antonio  Kingdom of Italy 13 Sunk
26 July 1917 Blanchette  Kingdom of Italy 280 Sunk
26 July 1917 Gesu E Maria  Kingdom of Italy 196 Sunk
27 July 1917 Frigido  Kingdom of Italy 59 Sunk
27 July 1917 Genova  Kingdom of Italy 3,486 Sunk
28 July 1917 Splendor  Kingdom of Italy 6,507 Damaged
1 August 1917 Llandudno  United Kingdom 4,187 Sunk
4 August 1917 Angelina T.  Kingdom of Italy 146 Sunk
8 August 1917 Llanishen  United Kingdom 3,837 Sunk
9 August 1917 Flora  Kingdom of Italy 125 Sunk
9 August 1917 Industria  Spain 51 Sunk
15 August 1917 Bandai Maru  Japan 3,227 Sunk
23 January 1918 Capri  Kingdom of Italy 3,899 Damaged
24 January 1918 Antonios J. Dracoulis  Greece 3,301 Sunk
25 January 1918 Apostoles Andreas  United Kingdom 50 Sunk
29 January 1918 Taxiarchis  United Kingdom 160 Sunk
31 January 1918 Eggesford  United Kingdom 4,414 Damaged
1 February 1918 Glenamoy  United Kingdom 7,269 Damaged
4 February 1918 Ravenshoe  United Kingdom 3,592 Damaged
4 February 1918 Standish Hall  United Kingdom 3,996 Sunk
20 March 1918 Saint Dimitrios  United Kingdom 3,359 Sunk
20 March 1918 Samoset  United Kingdom 5,251 Sunk
20 March 1918 Yochow  United Kingdom 2,127 Sunk
20 March 1918 Antonios M. Theophilatos  Greece 2,282 Sunk
31 March 1918 La Loire  France 5,343 Sunk
5 May 1918 Aghios Johannis  Greece 20 Sunk

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ type U31
  2. ^ Fitzsimons, Bernard, ed. "U-Boats (1905-18)", in The Illustrated Encyclopedia of 20th Century Weapons and Warfare, "(Phoebus Publishing, 1978), Volume 23, p.2534.
  3. ^ Fitzsimons, p.2575; he mistakenly identifies it as 86mm p.2534.
  4. ^ a b c "WWI U-boats - U 33". uboat.net. 2009. Retrieved August 29, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Charles Fryatt". Southern Life. Retrieved 4 December 2009. 
  6. ^ The Great Eastern Railway Magazine, September 1916, p218-26
  7. ^ Times article 5 days after the event, retrieved Dec 31,2009
  8. ^ a b The War on hospital ships, from the narratives of eye-witnesses (1917) (1917 ed.). London : T. Fisher Unwin. p. 1.  - Call number: SRLF_UCLA:LAGE-3563453
  9. ^ #2
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r National Archives, Kew: HW 7/3, Room 40, History of German Naval Warfare 1914-1918 (Published below - Room 40: German Naval Warfare 1914-1918)
  11. ^ "SM U-33 successes". UBoat.net. Retrieved 16 December 2014. 

References[edit]

  • Spindler, Arno (1932,1933,1934,1941/1964,1966). Der Handelskrieg mit U-Booten. 5 Vols. Berlin: Mittler & Sohn. Vols. 4+5, dealing with 1917+18, are very hard to find: Guildhall Library, London, has them all, also Vol. 1-3 in an English translation: The submarine war against commerce.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  • Beesly, Patrick (1982). Room 40: British Naval Intelligence 1914-1918. London: H Hamilton. ISBN 978-0-241-10864-2. 
  • Halpern, Paul G. (1933). A Naval History of World War I. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-1-85728-498-0. 
  • Roessler, Eberhard (1997). Die Unterseeboote der Kaiserlichen Marine. Bonn: Bernard & Graefe. ISBN 978-3-7637-5963-7. 
  • Schroeder, Joachim (2002). Die U-Boote des Kaisers. Bonn: Bernard & Graefe. ISBN 978-3-7637-6235-4. 
  • Koerver, Hans Joachim (2008). Room 40: German Naval Warfare 1914-1918. Vol I., The Fleet in Action. Steinbach: LIS Reinisch. ISBN 978-3-902433-76-3. 
  • Koerver, Hans Joachim (2009). Room 40: German Naval Warfare 1914-1918. Vol II., The Fleet in Being. Steinbach: LIS Reinisch. ISBN 978-3-902433-77-0. 

External links[edit]