SM UB-123

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For other ships of the same name, see German submarine U-123.
UB 148 at sea 2.jpeg
UB-148 at sea, a U-boat similar to UB-123.
Career (German Empire)
Name: UB-123
Ordered: 6/8 February 1917[1]
Builder: AG Weser, Bremen[2]
Cost: 3,654,000 German Papiermark[2]
Yard number: 296[2]
Launched: 2 March 1918[3]
Commissioned: 6 April 1918[3]
Fate: Sunk 19 October 1918.[3]
General characteristics
Class & type: German Type UB III submarine
Type: Coastal submarine
Displacement: 512 t (504 long tons; 564 short tons) surfaced
643 t (633 long tons; 709 short tons) submerged[2]
Length: 55.85 m (183.2 ft) o/a[2]
Beam: 5.8 m (19 ft)[2]
Draught: 3.72 m (12.2 ft)[2]
Propulsion: 2 shafts
6-cylinder Körting diesel engines,[4] 1,060 ihp (790 kW)
Siemens-Schuckert[4] electric motors, 788 ihp (588 kW)[2]
Speed: 13.9 knots (25.7 km/h; 16.0 mph) surfaced
7.6 knots (14.1 km/h; 8.7 mph) submerged[2]
Range: 7,280 nmi (13,480 km; 8,380 mi) at 6 kn (11 km/h; 6.9 mph) surfaced
55 nmi (102 km; 63 mi) at 4 kn (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged[2]
Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)[4]
Complement: 3 officers, 31 men[4]
Armament: • 5 × 50 cm (19.7 in) torpedo tubes (4 bow, 1 stern) with 10 torpedoes
• 1 × 10.5 cm (4.13 in) deck gun[4]
Service record
Part of:
Commanders:

SM UB-123 was a German Type UB III submarine or U-boat in the German Imperial Navy (German: Kaiserliche Marine) during World War I. She was commissioned into the German Imperial Navy on 6 April 1918 as SM UB-123.[nb 1]

She torpedoed and sunk RMS Leinster a vessel operated by the City of Dublin Steam Packet Company on 10 October 1918, shortly after the new German Government had asked President Wilson to negotiate an armistice. Leinster went down just outside Dublin Bay. Over 500 people perished in the sinking — the greatest single loss of life in the Irish Sea.

UB-123 struck a mine at the North Sea Mine Barrage on 19 October 1918, all 36 crew members died in the event.[3]

Construction[edit]

She was built by AG Weser of Bremen[2] and following just under a year of construction, launched at Bremen on 2 March 1918. UB-123 was commissioned later the same year . Like all Type UB III submarines, UB-123 carried 10 torpedoes and was armed with a 10.5 cm (4.13 in) deck gun. UB-123 would carry a crew of up to 3 officer and 31 men and had a cruising range of 7,280 nautical miles (13,480 km).[2] UB-123 had a displacement of 512 t (504 long tons; 564 short tons) while surfaced and 643 t (633 long tons; 709 short tons) when submerged. Her engines enabled her to travel at 13.9 knots (25.7 km/h; 16.0 mph) when surfaced and 7.6 knots (14.1 km/h; 8.7 mph) when submerged.[2]


Notes[edit]

Footnotes
  1. ^ "SM" stands for "Seiner Majestät" (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot would be translated as His Majesty's Submarine.
Citations
  1. ^ Rössler 1979, p. 55.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Gröner 1985, p. 52.
  3. ^ a b c d Gröner 1985, p. 55.
  4. ^ a b c d e Gröner 1985, p. 53.


References[edit]