SM UC-19

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For other ships of the same name, see German submarine U-19.
Career (German Empire)
Name: UC-19
Ordered: 26 August 1915[1]
Builder: Blohm & Voss, Hamburg[2]
Yard number: 269[1]
Launched: 15 March 1916[1]
Commissioned: 21 August 1916[1]
Fate: depth charged, 6 December 1916[1]
General characteristics
Class & type: German Type UC II submarine
Displacement: 417 t (460 short tons), surfaced[2]
493 t (543 short tons), submerged
Length: 161 ft 11 in (49.35 m)[2]
Beam: 17 ft 4 in (5.28 m)[2]
Draft: 12 ft 2 in (4 m)[3]
Propulsion: 2 × propeller shafts
2 × 6-cylinder, 4-stroke diesel engines, 500 bhp (370 kW)[3]
2 × electric motors, 460 shp (340 kW)[3]
Speed: 11.6 knots (21.5 km/h), surfaced[2]
7.0 knots (13.0 km/h), submerged
Endurance: 9,430 nautical miles at 7 knots, surfaced[3]
(17,460 km at 13 km/h)
55 nautical miles at 4 knots, submerged[3]
(102 km at 7.4 km/h)
Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)[3]
Complement: 26[3]
Armament: 6 × 100 cm (39.4 in) mine tubes[3]
18 × UC 200 mines
3 × 50 cm (19.7 in) torpedo tubes (2 bow/external; one stern)
7 × torpedoes
1 × 8.8 cm (3.46 in) KL/30 deck gun[2]
Notes: 35-second diving time[2]

SM UC-19 was a German Type UC II minelaying submarine or U-boat in the German Imperial Navy (German: Kaiserliche Marine) during World War I. The U-boat was ordered on 26 August 1915 and was launched on 15 March 1916. She was commissioned into the German Imperial Navy on 21 August 1916 as SM UC-19.[Note 1] In 3 patrols UC-19 was credited with sinking 4 ships, either by torpedo or by mines laid. UC-19 was sunk by depth charges from HMS Ariel in the English Channel on 6 December 1916.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "SM" stands for "Seiner Majestät" (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot would be translated as His Majesty's Submarine.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boats: UC-19". U-Boat War in World War I. Uboat.net. Retrieved 22 February 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Tarrant, p. 173.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Gardiner, p. 182.

Bibliography[edit]