USS Comber (SS-527)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from SS-527)
Jump to: navigation, search
For other ships of the same name, see USS Comber.
Career (United States)
Name: USS Comber
Namesake: The comber, a fish
Builder: Boston Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts (proposed)
Laid down: Never
Fate: Construction contract cancelled 29 July 1944
General characteristics
Class & type: Tench-class diesel-electric submarine [1]
Displacement: 1,570 tons (1,595 t) surfaced [1]
2,416 tons (2,455 t) submerged [1]
Length: 311 ft 8 in (95.00 m) [1]
Beam: 27 ft 4 in (8.33 m) [1]
Draft: 17 ft 0 in (5.18 m) maximum [1]
Propulsion:

4 × Fairbanks-Morse Model 38D8-⅛ 10-cylinder opposed piston diesel engines driving electrical generators[1][2]
2 × 126-cell Sargo batteries[3]
2 × low-speed direct-drive General Electric electric motors [1]
two propellers [1]
5,400 shp (4.0 MW) surfaced[1]

2,740 shp (2.0 MW) submerged[1]
Speed: 20.25 knots (38 km/h) surfaced [3]
8.75 knots (16 km/h) submerged [3]
Range: 11,000 nautical miles (20,000 km) surfaced at 10 knots (19 km/h) [3]
Endurance: 48 hours at 2 knots (3.7 km/h) submerged [3]
75 days on patrol
Test depth: 400 ft (120 m) [3]
Complement: 10 officers, 71 enlisted [3]
Armament: 10 × 21-inch (533 mm) torpedo tubes
 (six forward, four aft)
 28 torpedoes[3]
1 × 5-inch (127 mm) / 25 caliber deck gun[3]
Bofors 40 mm and Oerlikon 20 mm cannon

USS Comber (SS-527), a Tench-class submarine, was the second ship of the United States Navy to bear the name. She was named for the comber, a fish found in the Red Sea, the Mediterranean Sea, and the eastern Atlantic as far north as the British Isles.

Her name was assigned on 5 May 1944, but construction was canceled on 29 July 1944.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Bauer, K. Jack; Roberts, Stephen S. (1991). Register of Ships of the U.S. Navy, 1775-1990: Major Combatants. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. pp. 280–282. ISBN 0-313-26202-0. 
  2. ^ U.S. Submarines Through 1945 pp. 261–263
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i U.S. Submarines Through 1945 pp. 305–311