SS George Calvert (MC Hull 29)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Note: The USAS American Mariner, originally commissioned as the SS George Calvert (build number 2007/MC Hull 20) should not be confused with the SS George Calvert (build number 2016/MC Hull 29) which was constructed shortly thereafter.
Career (USA)
Name: SS George Calvert
Namesake: George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore
Builder: Bethlehem-Fairfield, Baltimore Maryland
Yard number: 2016
Way number: 3
Laid down: 19 November 1941
Launched: 14 March 1942
Completed: 30 April 1942
Fate: Torpedoed and sunk near Cuba, May 1942
General characteristics
Class and type: Type EC2-S-C1 Liberty ship
Displacement: 14,245 long tons (14,474 t)[1]
Length: 441 ft 6 in (134.57 m) o/a
417 ft 9 in (127.33 m) p/p
427 ft (130 m) w/l[1]
Beam: 57 ft (17 m)[1]
Draft: 27 ft 9 in (8.46 m)[1]
Propulsion: Two oil-fired boilers
Triple-expansion steam engine
2,500 hp (1,900 kW)
Single screw
Speed: 11 knots (20 km/h; 13 mph)[1]
Range: 20,000 nmi (37,000 km; 23,000 mi)
Capacity: 10,856 t (10,685 long tons) deadweight (DWT)[1]
Crew: 81[1]
Armament: Stern-mounted 4 in (100 mm) deck gun for use against surfaced submarines, variety of anti-aircraft guns

SS George Calvert was a Liberty ship, Maritime Commission hull number 29, built by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation at the Bethlehem-Fairfield Yard in Baltimore, Maryland, and launched on 14 March 1942.[2]

The ship served as a freighter to carry goods during World War II. She was sunk in May 1942 by a torpedo launched from a German submarine near Cuba.[3]

Two Liberty ships with the same name[edit]

The USAS American Mariner, originally launched as the SS George Calvert (build number 2007/MC Hull 20), should not be confused with this SS George Calvert (build number 2016/MC Hull 29) which was constructed shortly thereafter.

Hull number 20 was reportedly set aside after launch due to structural problems during assembly. As a result, hull number 29 was given her name. Hull number 29 was sunk in May 1942, and, as a result, when hull number 20 was turned over as "ready-for-issue" to the War Shipping Administration in 1943, there was no reason to change her name since hull number 29 no longer existed.

Sinking of Hull Number 29[edit]

Numerous Internet lists incorrectly report that the MC Hull 29 was sunk in 1944 off the coast of Cuba by a torpedo from an aircraft. Official Merchant Marine records and a survivor account indicate that MC Hull 29 with over 9,000 tons of cargo was actually sunk by a German submarine, using three torpedoes and killing ten crew members, off the coast of Cuba on 20 May 1942, on her maiden voyage from Baltimore, Maryland to Iran.

After being interrogated by the commander of the German submarine, the surviving crew members proceeded to Cuba in three lifeboats, arriving there the next morning.

Clay Blair, in Hitler's U-Boat War confirms that MC Hull 29, at 7,200 tons, was torpedoed by German Type VIIC submarine U-753, commanded by Alfred Manhardt von Manstein in May 1942.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ a b c d e f g Davies, James (2012). "Liberty Cargo Ships". ww2ships.com. p. 23. Retrieved 6 May 2012. 
  2. ^ "Bethlehem Fairfield". shipbuildinghistory.com. 2012. Retrieved 7 May 2012. 
  3. ^ "George Calvert". uboat.net. 2012. Retrieved 7 May 2012. 
Bibliography