SS Memel

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Career
Name: Reval (1925–34)
Memel (1934–45)
Empire Constellation (1945–46)
Ivan Sechenov (1946–1977)
Owner: Lübeck Linie AG (1925–34)
Mathies Reederei (1934–45)
Ministry of War Transport (1945)
Ministry of Transport (1945–46)
Soviet Government (1946–1977)
Operator: Lübeck Linie AG (1925–34)
Mathies Reederei (1934–45)
J Hay & Sons Ltd (1945–46)
Soviet Government (1946–1977)
Port of registry: Weimar Republic Lübeck (1925–33)
Nazi Germany Lübeck (1933–34)
Nazi Germany Hamburg (1934–45)
United Kingdom London (1945–46)
Soviet Union Soviet Union (1946–1977)
Builder: Schiffs-und Dockbauwerft Flender
Launched: 1925
Identification: Code Letters PCDL (1925-34)
ICS Papa.svgICS Charlie.svgICS Delta.svgICS Lima.svg
Code Letters DRBK (1934–45)
ICS Delta.svgICS Romeo.svgICS Bravo.svgICS Kilo.svg
Code Letters GKTC (1945–46)
ICS Golf.svgICS Kilo.svgICS Tango.svgICS Charlie.svg
United Kingdom Official Number 180774 (1945–46)
Fate: Sunk in 1977
General characteristics
Class & type: Cargo ship
Tonnage: 1,102 GRT
575 NRT
Length: 220 ft 7 in (67.23 m)
Beam: 34 ft 6 in (10.52 m)
Depth: 12 ft 5 in (3.78 m)
Installed power: Triple expansion steam engine
Propulsion: Screw propellor

Memel was a 1,102 GRT cargo ship that was built in 1925 as Reval by Schiffs-und Dockbauwerft Flender AG, Lübeck, Germany for German owners. A sale in 1934 saw her renamed Memel. She was seized by the Allies in May 1945, passed to the Ministry of War Transport (MoWT) and was renamed Empire Constellation. In 1946, she was transferred to the Soviet Union and renamed Ivan Sechenov.[Note A]

Description[edit]

The ship was built in 1925 by Schiffs-und Dockbauwerft Flender AG, Lübeck.[1]

The ship was 220 feet 7 inches (67.23 m) long, with a beam of 34 feet 6 inches (10.52 m) and a depth of 12 feet 5 inches (3.78 m). The ship had a GRT of 1,102 and a NRT of 575.[2]

The ship was propelled by a triple expansion steam engine, which had cylinders of 16 34 inches (43 cm), 27 916 inches (70.0 cm) and 43 516 inches (110.0 cm) diameter by 27 916 inches (70.0 cm) stroke. The engine was built by Waggon-und Maschinenbau AG, Görlitz.[2]

History[edit]

Reval was built for Lübeck Linie AG, Lübeck.[1] Her port of registry was Lübeck. The Code Letters PCDL were allocated.[2] In 1929, her captain was Walter Heinrich Giermann, who had previously captained the four-masted schooner Vaterland.[3] In 1934, Reval was sold to Mathies Reederei, Hamburg and was renamed Memel.[1] Her port of registry was changed to Hamburg and the Code Letters DRBK were allocated.[4]

In May 1945, Memel was seized by the Allies at Flensburg. She was passed to the MoWT and renamed Empire Constellation.[1] Her port of registry was changed to London and she was placed under the management of J Hay & Sons Ltd. The Code Letters GKTC and United Kingdom Official Number 180774 were allocated.[5] In 1946, Empire Constellation was transferred to the Soviet Union,[1] and was renamed Ivan Gegenov.[6]

On 14 January 1977, a ship named Ivan Sechenov sank after colliding with the Liberian cargo ship Praktikolas Maris in foggy conditions in the Sea of Marmara, Turkey, with the loss of 22 crew.[7][Note A]

Notes[edit]

^Note A Mitchell & Sawyer give the name as Ivan Sechenov (Ива́н Се́ченов), but it was recorded as Ivan Gegenov in contemporary shipping registers. It is possible that she was later renamed Ivan Sechenov or that Ivan Gegenov is an error.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Mitchell, W.H.; Sawyer, L.A. (1995). The Empire Ships. London, New York, Hamburg, Hong Kong: Lloyd's of London Press Ltd. p. not cited. ISBN 1-85044-275-4. 
  2. ^ a b c "LLOYD'S REGISTER, NAVIRES A VAPEUR ET A MOTEURS". Plimsoll Ship Data. Retrieved 25 August 2010. 
  3. ^ "Walter Heinrich Giermann" (in German). Jürgen Ruszkowski. Retrieved 25 August 2010. 
  4. ^ "LLOYD'S REGISTER, NAVIRES A VAPEUR ET A MOTEURS". Plimsoll Ship Data. Retrieved 25 August 2010. 
  5. ^ "LLOYD'S REGISTER, STEAMERS & MOTORSHIPS". Plimsoll Ship Data. Retrieved 25 August 2010. 
  6. ^ "LLOYD'S REGISTER, STEAMERS & MOTORSHIPS". Plimsoll Ship Data. Retrieved 25 August 2010. 
  7. ^ "37 are feared dead after collisions at sea" The Times (London). Friday, 14 January 1977. (59907), col D, p. 10.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°26′N 27°23′E / 40.43°N 27.38°E / 40.43; 27.38