S-class destroyer (1916)

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For the S class of destroyers built in 1942–43, see S and T class destroyer.
HMAS Success
Class overview
Operators:  Royal Navy
 Royal Australian Navy
Canada Royal Canadian Navy
Preceded by: Admiralty Modified R class
Succeeded by: Admiralty V class leader
In commission: 1918 - 1945
Planned: 69
Completed: 67
Cancelled: 2
Lost: 5 wrecked or sunk
2 constructive total loss
1 captured (later returned)
General characteristics
Type: Destroyer
Displacement: 1,075 tons
Length: 276 ft (84 m) o/a
Beam: 26 ft 9 in (8.15 m)
Draught: 10 ft 10 in (3.30 m)
Propulsion: Brown-Curtis, steam turbines, 2 shafts, 27,000 shp
Speed: 36 knots
Range: 250-300 tons of oil
Complement: 90
Armament:

3 × QF 4-inch (101.6 mm) Mark IV guns, mount P Mk. IX
1 × QF 2-pounder (40-mm) Mark II "pom-pom"
4 × Lewis Guns
2 × twin tubes for 21-inch (530 mm) torpedoes

2 × single 18 in tubes (on several, later removed)

The S class were a class of 67 destroyers built from 1917 for the Royal Navy. The design was based on the Admiralty modified R class and all ships had names beginning with S or T.

They were built in three discrete groups; the Admiralty S class comprised 55 vessels (excluding two that were cancelled) built in two batches that were ordered in May and June 1917 respectively, while seven vessels were built to a distinct design by Yarrow and five more to another distinct design by Thornycroft. All ships had two funnels, a long fo'c'sle and a tall bridge which, unusually, was located behind the break in the main deck. Most of these ships were commissioned after World War I, but only eleven survived to serve in World War II. The remainder were scrapped in the mid-to-late 1930s, in order to comply with the limit on total destroyer tonnage imposed by the London Treaty of 1930.

Admiralty S-class ships[edit]

24 vessels were ordered in April 1917.

  • Sabre, built by Alexander Stephen and Sons, Linthouse, Govan, laid down 10 September 1917, launched 23 September 1918, and completed 9 November 1918. Sold for breaking up November 1945.[1]
  • Saladin, built by Stephen, laid down 10 September 1917, launched 17 February 1919, and completed 11 April 1919.[1] Sold for breaking up 29 June 1947.[2]
  • Simoom, built by John Brown and Company, Clydebank, laid down 30 May 1917, launched 26 January 1918, and completed March 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 8 January 1931.[3]
  • Scimitar, built by John Brown, laid down 30 May 1917, launched 27 February 1918, and completed 13 April 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 29 June 1947.[2]
  • Scotsman, built by John Brown, laid down 10 December 1917, launched 30 March 1918, and completed 21 May 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up (delivered) 13 July 1937.[3]
  • Scout, built by John Brown, laid down 25 October 1917, launched 27 April 1918, and completed 15 June 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up (delivered) 2 March 1946.[3]
  • Senator, built by William Denny and Brothers, Dumbarton, laid down 10 July 1917,[1] launched 2 April 1918,[3] and completed 7 June 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up (delivered) 7 September 1936.[3]
  • Sepoy, built by Denny, laid down 6 August 1917, launched 22 May 1918, and completed 6 August 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 2 July 1932.[3]
  • Seraph, built by Denny, laid down 4 October 1917, launched 8 July 1918, and completed 25 December 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up May 1934.[3]
  • Shark, built by Swan Hunter and Wigham Richardson, Wallsend on Tyne, laid down September 1917, launched 9 April 1918, and completed 10 July 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 5 February 1931.[3]
  • Sparrowhawk, built by Swan Hunter, laid down September 1917, launched 14 May 1918, and completed 4 September 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 5 February 1931.[3]
  • Splendid, built by Swan Hunter, laid down September 1917, launched 10 July 1918 and completed October 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 8 January 1931.[3]
  • Success, built by William Doxford and Sons, Sunderland, launched 29 June 1918, and completed April 1919.[1] Transferred to Royal Australian Navy in June 1919,[3] commissioned 27 January 1920, paid off to reserve 21 June 1930, sold (£2277) for breaking up by Penguins Ltd of Balmain, Sydney 4 June 1937.
  • Shamrock, built by Doxford, laid down November 1917, launched 26 August 1918, and completed 16 September 1919.[1] Sold for breaking up (delivered) 23 November 1936.[3]
  • Shikari, built by Doxford, laid down 15 January 1918, launched 14 July 1919, and completed at Chatham Dockyard in April 1924.[1] Sold for breaking up (delivered) 4 November 1945.[3]
  • Sikh, built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Govan, laid down August 1917, launched 7 May 1918, and completed 29 June 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 26 July 1927.[3]
  • Sirdah, built by Fairfield, laid down August 1917, launched 6 July 1918, and completed 6 September 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 4 May 1934.[3]
  • Somme, built by Fairfield, laid down November 1917, launched 10 September 1918, and completed 4 November 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 25 August 1932.[3]
  • Steadfast, built by Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Hebburn on Tyne, laid down September 1917, launched 8 August 1918, and completed March 1919.[1] Sold for breaking up 28 July 1934.
  • Sterling, built by Palmers, laid down October 1917, launched 8 October 1918, and completed March 1919.[1] Sold for breaking up 25 August 1932.[3]
  • Swallow, built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Greenock, laid down September 1917, launched 1 August 1918, and completed 27 September 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up (delivered) 24 September 1936.[3]
  • Swordsman, built by Scott's, launched 28 December 1918, and completed March 1919.[1] Transferred to Royal Australian Navy in June 1919,[3] commissioned 27 January 1920, paid off to reserve 21 December 1929, sold (£2774) for breaking up by Penguins Ltd of Balmain, Sydney 4 June 1937.
  • Tribune, built by J. Samuel White and Company, Cowes, laid down 21 August 1917, launched 28 March 1918, and completed 16 July 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 17 December 1931.[3]
  • Trinidad, built by White, laid down 15 September 1917, launched 8 April 1918, and completed 9 September 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 16 February 1932.[3]

33 vessels were ordered in June 1917.

  • Sardonyx, built by Stephen, laid down 25 March 1918, launched 27 May 1919, and completed 12 July 1919.[1] Sold for breaking up (delivered) October 1945.[2]
  • Saturn, also from Stephen, order cancelled 1919.[1]
  • Sycamore, also from Stephen, order cancelled 1919.[1]
  • Scythe, built by John Brown, laid down 14 January 1918,[citation needed] launched 25 April 1918, and completed July 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 28 November 1931.[3]
  • Seabear, built by John Brown, laid down 13 December 1917, launched 6 July 1918, and completed September 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 5 February 1931.[3]
  • Seafire, built by John Brown, laid down 27 February 1918, launched 10 August 1918, and completed November 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up (delivered) 14 September 1936.[3]
  • Searcher, built by John Brown, laid down 30 March 1918, launched 11 September 1918, and completed November 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 25 March 1936.[3]
  • Seawolf, built by John Brown, laid down 30 April 1918, launched 2 November 1918, and completed January 1919.[1] Sold for breaking up 23 February 1931.[3]
  • Serapis, built by Denny, laid down 4 December 1917, launched 17 September 1918, and completed 21 March 1919.[4] Sold for breaking up 25 January 1934.[3]
  • Serene, built by Denny, laid down 2 February 1918, launched 30 November 1918, and completed 30 April 1919.[4] Sold for breaking up (delivered) 14 September 1936.[3]
  • Sesame, built by Denny, laid down 13 March 1918, launched 30 December 1918, and completed 28 March 1919.[4] Sold for breaking up 4 May 1934.[3]
  • Spear, built by Fairfield, launched 9 November 1918, and completed 17 December 1918.[4] Sold for breaking up 13 July 1926.[3]
  • Spindrift, built by Fairfield, launched 30 December 1918, and completed 2 April 1919.[4] Sold for breaking up July 1936.[5]
  • Sportive, built by Swan Hunter, laid down February 1918, launched 19 September 1918, and completed December 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up (delivered) 25 September 1936.[5]
  • Stalwart, built by Swan Hunter, laid down April 1918, launched 23 October 1918, and completed April 1919.[1] Transferred to Royal Australian Navy in June 1919,[5] commissioned 27 January 1920, paid off to reserve 1 December 1925, sold (£2474) for breaking up by Penguins Ltd of Balmain, Sydney 4 June 1937.
  • Tilbury, built by Swan Hunter, laid down November 1917, launched 13 June 1918, and completed 17 September 1918. Sold for breaking up February 1931.[1]
  • Tintagel, built by Swan Hunter, laid down December 1917, launched 9 August 1918, and completed December 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 16 February 1932.[5]
  • Stonehenge, built by Palmers, launched 19 March 1919, and completed September 1919.[1] Wrecked near Smyrna 6 November 1920.[5]
  • Stormcloud, built by Palmers, laid down May 1918, launched 30 May 1919,[4] and completed in late 1919. Sold for breaking up 28 July 1934.[5]
  • Strenuous, built by Scott's, launched 9 November 1918, and completed January 1919.[4] Sold for breaking up 25 August 1932.[5]
  • Stronghold, built by Scott's, laid down March 1918, launched 6 May 1919, and completed 2 July 1919.[4] Sunk in action south of Java 4 March 1942.[5]
  • Sturdy, built by Scott's, laid down April 1918,[4] launched 25 June 1919,[5] and completed October 1919.[4] Wrecked on Tiree 30 October 1940.[5]
  • Tactician, built by William Beardmore and Company, Dalmuir, laid down 21 November 1917, launched 7 August 1918, and completed 23 October 1918. Sold for breaking up February 1931.[1]
  • Tara, built by Beardmore, laid down 21 November 1917, launched 12 October 1918, and completed 9 December 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 17 December 1931.[5]
  • Tasmania, built by Beardmore, laid down 18 December 1917, launched 22 November 1918, and completed 29 January 1919.[1] Transferred to Royal Australian Navy in June 1919,[5] commissioned 27 January 1920, paid off to reserve 9 January 1928, sold (£3474) for breaking up by Penguins Ltd of Balmain, Sydney 9 January 1937.
  • Tattoo, built by Beardmore, laid down 21 December 1917, launched 28 December 1918, and completed 7 April 1919.[1] Transferred to Royal Australian Navy in June 1919,[5] commissioned 27 January 1920, paid off to reserve on three separate occasions before being sold (£2774) for breaking up by Penguins Ltd of Balmain, Sydney 4 June 1937.
  • Tenedos, built by R. & W. Hawthorn, Leslie and Company, Hebburn on Tyne, laid down 6 December 1917, launched 21 October 1918, and completed June 1919.[4] Sunk by Japanese aircraft off Colombo 5 April 1942.[5]
  • Thanet, built by Hawthorn, Leslie, laid down 13 December 1917, launched 5 November 1918, and completed 30 August 1919.[4] Sunk in action off Malaya 27 January 1942.[5]
  • Thracian, built by Hawthorn, Leslie, laid down 17 January 1918, launched 5 March 1920, and completed at Sheerness Dockyard April 1920.[4] Run ashore at Hong Kong 24 December 1941, became Japanese Patrol Boat No.101 on 1 October 1942, returned to Royal Navy control October 1945, broken up 1947.[5]
  • Turbulent, built by Hawthorn, Leslie, laid down 14 November 1917, launched 29 May 1919, and completed 10 October 1919.[4] Sold for breaking up (delivered) 25 August 1936.[5]
  • Trojan, built by White, laid down 3 January 1918, launched 20 July 1918, and completed 6 December 1918.[4] Sold for breaking up (delivered) 24 September 1936.[5]
  • Truant, built by White, laid down 14 February 1918, launched 18 September 1918, and completed 17 March 1919.[4] Sold for breaking up 28 November 1931.[5]
  • Trusty, built by White, laid down 11 April 1918, launched 6 November 1918, and completed 9 May 1919.[4] Sold for breaking up (delivered) 25 September 1936.[5]

Thornycroft S-class ships[edit]

These five vessels were built to Thornycroft's own design; they were slightly larger than the Admiralty design and had engines of 29,000 shp. The first two were ordered in April 1917 and the last three in June 1917.

  • Speedy, built by J. I. Thornycroft and Company, Woolston, laid down May 1917, launched 1 June 1918, and completed 14 August 1918.[1] Sunk in collision with a merchant ship in the Sea of Marmara 24 September 1922.[5]
  • Tobago, built by Thornycroft, laid down May 1917, launched 15 July 1918, and completed 2 October 1918.[1] Damaged by mine 12 November 1920 in the Black Sea and declared constructive total loss, sold for breaking up at Malta 9 February 1922.[6][5]
  • Torbay, built by Thornycroft, laid down November 1917, launched 6 March 1918, and completed 17 July 1919. Transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy in March 1928 and renamed Champlain, broken up 1937.[4]
  • Toreador, built by Thornycroft, laid down November 1917, launched 7 December 1918, and completed April 1919. Transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy in March 1928 and renamed Vancouver, broken up 1937.[4]
  • Tourmaline, built by Thornycroft, laid down January 1918, launched 12 April 1919, and completed December 1919.[4] Sold for breaking up 28 November 1931.[5]

Yarrow S-class ships[edit]

These seven vessels were built to Yarrow's own design; they were slightly smaller than the Admiralty design and had engines of only 23,000 shp. All ordered in April 1917; the orders for Torch and Tomahawk replaced previous orders for two Admiralty W-class destroyers previously ordered from Yarrow in December 1916 (Wayfarer and Woodpecker). Their design was weakened in order to optimize speed, which explains the early disposal of these vessels.

  • Torch, built by Yarrow and Company, Scotstoun, laid down April 1917, launched 16 March 1918, and completed 11 May 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 19 November 1929.[7]
  • Tomahawk, built by Yarrow, laid down April 1917,[1] launched 16 May 1918,[7] and completed 8 July 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 26 June 1928.[7]
  • Tryphon, built by Yarrow, launched 22 June 1918, and completed September 1918.[1] Stranded 4 May 1919 and declared constructive total loss, sold for breaking up at Malta 27 September 1920.[7]
  • Tumult, built by Yarrow, laid down June 1917, launched 17 September 1918, and completed December 1918.[1] Sold for breaking up 3 October 1928.[7]
  • Turquoise, built by Yarrow, laid down June 1917, launched 9 November 1918, and completed March 1919.[1] Sold for breaking up January 1932.[7]
  • Tuscan, built by Yarrow, laid down June 1917, launched 1 March 1919, and completed 24 June 1919.[1] Sold for breaking up 25 August 1932.[7]
  • Tyrian, built by Yarrow, laid down June 1917, launched 2 July 1919, and completed 23 December 1919.[1] Sold for breaking up February 1930.[7]

Australian ships[edit]

Five of the above Admiralty S class were transferred to the Royal Australian Navy in June 1919. The ships were all commissioned on 27 January 1920 although they spent much of their careers in reserve. None of these ships served in World War II, having been scrapped in 1937.

Canadian ships[edit]

Two of the Thornycroft S class were transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy in March 1928. Neither of these ships served in World War II, having been scrapped in 1937.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az Friedman 2009, p. 311.
  2. ^ a b c Whitley 2000, p. 83.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad Dittmar and Colledge 1972, p. 74.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Friedman 2009, p. 312.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Dittmar and Colledge 1972, p. 75.
  6. ^ Gardiner and Gray 1985, p. 85.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Dittmar and Colledge 1972, p. 76.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Dittmar, F.J.; Colledge, J.J. (1972). British Warships 1914–1919. Shepperton, UK: Ian Allen. ISBN 0-7110-0380-7. 
  • Friedman, Norman (2009). British Destroyers: From Earliest Days to the Second World War. Barnsley, UK: Seaforth Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84832-049-9. 
  • Gardiner, Robert; Gray, Randal (1985). Conway's All The World's Fighting Ships 1906–1921. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-245-5. 
  • Gillett, Ross (1977). Warships for Australia. Illustrations Colin Graham. Rigby Limited. ISBN 0-7270-0472-7. 
  • Whitley, M.J. (2000). Destroyers of World War Two: An International Encyclopedia. London: Cassell & Co. ISBN 1-85409-521-8. 

See also[edit]