Saafir

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Saafir
Birth name Reggie Gibson
Also known as Mr. No No
The Shaft Sizzle
The Saucee Nomad
Origin Oakland, California
Genres Hip-Hop
Occupations Emcee
Producer
Actor
Lyricist
Years active 1991–present
Labels Qwest/Reprise/Warner Bros. Records, Priority/EMI Records, ABB
Associated acts Golden State Project
Hobo Junction
Tupac Shakur
Digital Underground
Xzibit
Ras Kass
The Whoridas

Reggie Gibson, better known as Saafir, is an emcee, producer and actor from Oakland, California. He is also a member of the rap group "Golden State Project" (formerly known as Golden State Warriors) with Ras Kass and Xzibit. Born in Oakland, California, he lived with Tupac Shakur and became a dancer for Digital Underground. Saafir took part in one of the most notorious Bay Area rap battles, when he and members of the Hobo Junction went against Casual and members of the Hieroglyphics Crew. The battle took place live on KMEL. There has never been a real decision as to who won the battle and there is some debate as to whether or not Saafir was using pre-written raps.

Saafir made his recording debut on several cuts on Digital Underground's The Body-Hat Syndrome in 1993, followed by an appearance on Casual's Fear Itself in early 1994. He appeared in the film Menace II Society as Harold Lawson[1] and was featured on the film's soundtrack. With a deal from Qwest Records,[2] Saafir recruited the Hobo Junction production team (J Groove, J.Z., Rational, Big Nose, and Poke Martian) for his freestyle debut, Boxcar Sessions (1994). He recorded an album called Trigonometry under the alias Mr. No No before returning as Saafir in The Hit List (1999). The Hit List was considered Saafir's attempt at commercial acceptance. The album featured production by Stevie J (made famous for his work with P. Diddy's Hitmen production team) and guest vocals from West Coast heavyweights Kam and Jayo Felony and controversial East Coast lyricist Chino XL. In 2006, he released his fourth album, Good Game: The Transition (ABB Records, 2006). The album covers the major transitions throughout his life, most notably his spinal tumor, and his conversion to Islam.

In February 2013 on Davey D's Hip-Hop Corner, Digital Underground leader Shock-G revealed that Saafir was confined to a wheelchair due to complications from his spinal surgery.[3] Saafir later appeared on Sway & King Tech's The Wake Up Show to confirm his condition and clear up some of the misconceptions stemming from Shock-G's announcement.[4]

Saafir was one of the passengers flying on TWA Flight 843; he suffered a back injury as a consequence of the incident involving that flight..[5]


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