Sabreman (series)

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The Sabreman series of games was released by Ultimate Play the Game for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum in the 1980s. Some of the installments were also released on other popular home microcomputers, namely the Amstrad CPC, BBC Micro, Commodore 64 and MSX. The series stars Sabreman, who is depicted wearing khakis and a pith helmet.

Games[edit]

The story of Sabreman's adventures is not developed within the games themselves, but each game would come with an explanation of the story so far on the cassette inlay cards.

  • Sabre Wulf (1984),[1] in which Sabreman must escape a large jungle maze by collecting four pieces of an amulet, while avoiding the titular wulf. Finding all four will grant access to:
  • Underwurlde (1984), in which Sabreman must find three weapons to defeat three guardians in an extensive system of underground caverns. This done, three exits are available, each leading to one of the following three games.
  • Knight Lore (1984), in which Sabreman arrives at Knight Lore Castle to seek a cure for his newfound lycanthropy. Collecting a number of items for the resident wizard Melkhior achieves both the cure and progress to:
  • Pentagram (1986), in which Sabreman, as a newly qualified wizard himself, embarks on a quest to find the Pentagram, a powerful magic artifact. Once this is achieved Sabreman is directed to the final game in the series:
  • Mire Mare, which was never released and about which little is known.

Sabreman has also made appearances in Killer Instinct (in his Knight Lore-esque "Wulf" form) and a cameo in Banjo-Tooie (in the Hailfire Peaks level), both by Ultimate's successor company Rare, before returning for another game of his own in 2004 with Sabre Wulf on the Game Boy Advance. This game builds on the story from the original Sabre Wulf, the object being to collect amulet pieces to defeat the Wulf once again.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rusel DeMaria and Johnny L. Wilson, High Score!: The Illustrated History of Electronic Games (McGraw-Hill Professional, 2003), 355.

External links[edit]