Sacramento Police Department

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Sacramento Police Department
CA - Sacramento Police.jpg
Patch of the SPD
Agency overview
Formed 1849
Employees 1,239
Annual budget $130 million (2010)
Legal personality Governmental: Government agency
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdiction* City of Sacramento in the state of California, United States
Size 99.4 sq mi (257 km2)
Population 486,200
Legal jurisdiction City of Sacramento, CA
Governing body Sacramento City Council
General nature
Operational structure
Headquarters 5770 Freeport Blvd
Sacramento, CA
Officers 799
Unsworn members 440
Agency executive Samuel D. Somers Jr., Chief
Districts 6
Facilities
Beats 18
Helicopters 3
Airplanes 1
K9s 11
Website
http://www.sacpd.org/
Footnotes
* Divisional agency: Division of the country, over which the agency has usual operational jurisdiction.  See the reference[1] below for the source of the above data.

The Sacramento Police Department (SPD) is the police department for the city of Sacramento, California. The department was created in 1849. The current Chief of Police is Samuel D. Somers Jr.

[2]

History[edit]

Overview

www.sacpd.org

The founding of the City of Sacramento was a turbulent one - a beginning when life was cheap, the stakes were high and a large percentage of the population acted with the philosophy "it was every man for himself."

By 1849, Sacramento had grown rapidly from a small settlement at Sutter's Fort to a town of 10,000 people. The discovery of gold had brought people from all walks of life together. Sacramento had all the problems of a Wild West town. There were murders, robberies, shootings, and various other crimes committed in the city. In the summer of 1849, the city experienced its first lynching when a gambler named Roe was convicted by a citizens' committee and hanged for murder. On August 1, 1849, the City of Sacramento was founded when the first meeting of a Common Council was held. At that time, the City boundaries were north to the American river, east to 31st Street, south to Y Street and west to the Sacramento River, encompassing 4.5 square miles. N. C. Cunningham was appointed as the first City Marshall (the position now known as Chief of Police) and was given two deputies to enforce the law.

The city did not have a building for a police station or jail, so in May 1850, the ship, LaGrange, was moored at the foot of H Street on the river and officially became the police station and jail boat.

As a result of the Gold Rush in 1852, Sacramento had grown in size until the population had reached 150,000 persons. The Police Department was also increased to six men. In addition to normal police duties, these six officers had to deal with the first Chinese Tong War to ever occur outside of China. Also, the most ambitious murder plot ever recorded in the West occurred during this period. Three men, one of them the Public Administrator, plotted to kill 55 leading wealthy Sacramentans for their money. Fortunately, the Police Department identified the murderers and arrested two of them after the first killing. Both men were subsequently convicted and hanged for their crime.

The Police Department grew slowly from 1849 to 1913 when it had 36 officers. The men of the Department patrolled the city on foot and on bicycles. The Department had two bicycles at that time. A typical bicycle beat covered about one half of the entire city, or about 200 square blocks. In those years, the Department did not have radio equipment. Communication between the Police Station and the beat officers was accomplished by telephones located in specially designated "call boxes" distributed throughout the city for this purpose.

Modern police history, as we now know it, began in 1917. The city's population had declined to just 90,000 people after the Gold Rush boom, but the Department now totaled 100 men. During this period, other changes were made: the Department moved into the new Hall of Justice building at 6th and I Streets; the use of modern, fast automobiles had been incorporated as a new tool in police work; the Department had developed an experienced, well-trained detective bureau and possessed one of the finest fingerprint bureaus in the country. At this point, police operations had begun to enter fields of specialization.

The Department may be larger now and uses newer and more scientific methods in fighting and solving crimes, but the men and women of the Department are still dedicated to the same goal as the first three officers were in 1848; still providing the best police services possible to the citizens of Sacramento.

Whether by patrol car, motorcycle, bicycle, mounted horse, or helicopter, the men and women of the Sacramento Police Department serve with honor while striving to work in partnership with the community to fulfill the Department's vision of Community-Oriented Policing.

Organization[edit]

Office of the Chief[edit]

Intergovernmental & Legislative Affairs

Internal Affairs Division & Professional Standards Unit

Media & Public Relations Unit

Office of Operations[edit]

Patrol Division[edit]

The city of Sacramento is divided into six patrol districts which each district divided into three beats. Listed below are the Districts and the neighborhoods they include.

District One (Northwest)[edit]

Beat A - North Natomas
Beat B - South Natomas
Beat C - Northgate

District Two (Northeast)[edit]

Beat A - Robla/Del Paso Heights
Beat B - Hagginwood
Beat C - Arden/Old North Sac

District Three (Central)[edit]

Beat A - Downtown
Beat B - Midtown
Beat C - CSUS/East Sac

District Four (Southwest)[edit]

Beat A - Land Park/Curtis Park
Beat B - Hollywood Park/Woodbine
Beat C - South Land Park/Pocket/Greenhaven

District Five (South)[edit]

Beat A - Meadowview
Beat B - Parkway
Beat C - Valley Hi/North Laguna

District Six (East)[edit]

Beat A - Oak Park
Beat B - Tahoe Park/Tallac Village
Beat C - South East/Glen Elder/Fruitridge

Metro Division[edit]

The Metro Division provides specialized resources city-wide to both the Patrol Division and the Office of Investigations. Commanded by a captain, Metro is divided into three operational sections, each led by a police lieutenant, as well as an administrative support team.

Metro Administration[edit]

Hostage Negotiations Team (HNT)
Licensing and Permits

Regional Transit Police Services Section[edit]

Mission and Information [2]
Juvenile Intervention
Patrol Services
Transit Crime Response Team (TCRT)

Special Operations Section[edit]

Alarm Operations Unit
Canine Unit
Parole Intervention Team (PIT)
Reserve Officers/Special Events/Supplemental Employment Unit
Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) Teams (2)

Traffic / Air Operations Section[edit]

Air Support Unit
Alcoholic Beverage Liaison & Compliance
Court Liaison Unit
Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) Unit
Major Collisions Investigations Unit
Traffic Unit (2 Enforcement, 1 POP)

Office of Investigations[edit]

Office of Public Safety Information Technology[edit]

Office of Emergency Services and Homeland Security[edit]

Rank structure[edit]

Rank Insignia
Chief 4 Gold Stars.svg
Deputy Chief 2 Gold Stars.svg
Captain Captain insignia gold.svg
Lieutenant US-O1 insignia.svg
Sergeant SCSO Sergeant.png
Police Officer

[3]

Facilities[edit]

Police Headquarters (Public Safety Center)[edit]

William J Kinney Police Facility (North Station)[edit]

300 Richards Facility (Central Station)[edit]

Joseph E Rooney Police Facility (South Station)[edit]

Communications Center[edit]

This 28,000 sq. ft. state of the art facility serves as the primary answering point for emergency calls in the City of Sacramento. The Communications Division work groups are responsible for the answering, processing, and dispatching of emergency (911) and non-emergency phone calls. Ancillary duties include running a dispatch training & academy curriculum. The Communications Division holds the Peace Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) certificates for training in our region for the Dispatcher Basic Course as well as the Communications Training Officer Course.

2010 statistics include the following:

688,110 total incoming and outgoing phone calls;

181,140 9-1-1 calls; and,

256,574 7-digit emergency and non-emergency calls.

Police Academy/In-Service Training Facility (McClellan Park)[edit]

Fallen officers[edit]

Since the establishment of the Sacramento Police Department, 14 officers have died in the line of duty.[4]

Officer Date of Death Details
Special Police Officer George C. Chapman
Tuesday, April 27, 1858
Gunfire
Chief of Police Erskine G. Fish
Sunday, August 11, 1935
Gunfire
Police Officer Frank F. Mello
Saturday, June 30, 1951
Motorcycle accident
Police Officer Francis M. Rea
Sunday, January 3, 1954
Gunfire
Police Officer Arnold Z. Gamble
Friday, February 15, 1963
Gunfire
Police Officer Eugene G. McKnight
Tuesday, July 23, 1963
Gunfire
Officer Bernard M. Bennett
Wednesday, May 13, 1970
Gunfire
Police Officer Andrew L. Collins
Wednesday, April 19, 1972
Vehicle pursuit
Detective Doyle A. Popovich
Saturday, August 3, 1974
Gunfire
Police Officer Rodney T. Butts
Wednesday, October 15, 1975
Heart attack
Officer William H. Warner
Monday, June 1, 1981
Gunfire (Accidental)
Officer Michael David Gartrell
Thursday, April 25, 1991
Vehicle pursuit
Police Officer Emily Jewett Morgenroth
Friday, October 17, 1997
Vehicular assault
Police Officer William Chandler Bean Jr.
Tuesday, February 9, 1999
Gunfire

Chief of Police Erskine G. Fish was remembered by the radio series Dragnet, in the end of the 9th episode, aired on August 4th 1949.

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ 2009 Sacramento Police Department Annual Report
  2. ^ Excerpt taken from "Inside SAC PD" at the Department's Home Page www.sacpd.org
  3. ^ Annual report
  4. ^ [1]

External links[edit]