Sadcore

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Sadcore
Stylistic origins Indie rock, shoegazing, alternative country, baroque pop, chamber pop
Cultural origins Mid-1980s, United Kingdom and United States
Typical instruments Guitar, bass, strings, piano

Sadcore is a subgenre occasionally identified by music journalists to describe examples of alternative rock characterised by bleak lyrics, downbeat melodies and slower tempos. The term is an example of use of the suffix "-core". It is a loose definition and does not describe a specific movement or scene. It is categorised by Allmusic's reference guide as music "by and for the depressed".[1] Sadcore is synonymous with the term Slowcore, and both share the distinction of often being dismissed as a label by the bands they would describe.

LA Weekly called Charlyn Marshall (aka Cat Power) the "Queen of Sadcore".[2] In 2006, the News Record used the term to refer to Arab Strap, describing their sound as "a lot like the band's native Scotland: dark, cold, rainy and depressing" as well as "aggressive and somber."[3]

A 21 second sample of the song features Del Rey using lower vocals over a minimalist hip-hop influenced beat.[4] MTV regarded the single as being "Hollywood sadcore".[5]

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The term is still current in pop culture. Lana Del Rey's musical style has been described as "Hollywood sadcore".[6][7] In regards to her song, "Blue Jeans", MTV journalist Nicole James noted the neologism is a "music buzz word" floating around the music blogosphere.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allmusic definition
  2. ^ LA Weekly - Music - The Queen of Sadcore - John Payne - The Essential Online Resource for Los Angeles
  3. ^ Scottish duo release sadcore album - Arts & Entertainment
  4. ^ Copsey, Robert (November 23, 2011). "Lana Del Rey: 'People didn't take me seriously with a high voice'". Digital Spy. Hearts Magazines. Retrieved December 20, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b James, Nicole (12 September 2011). "New Video: Lana Del Rey, 'Blue Jeans'". MTV. Viacom. Retrieved 9 November 2012. 
  6. ^ James, Nicole. "New Video: Lana Del Rey, 'Blue Jeans'". MTV. Viacom. Retrieved 5 October 2012. 
  7. ^ "Lana Del Rey - Biography". MTV. Viacom. Retrieved 5 October 2012. 

External links[edit]