Saddle Brook, New Jersey

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Saddle Brook, New Jersey
Township
Township of Saddle Brook
Map highlighting Saddle Brook's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Saddle Brook's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Saddle Brook, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Saddle Brook, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°54′11″N 74°06′04″W / 40.902976°N 74.101061°W / 40.902976; -74.101061Coordinates: 40°54′11″N 74°06′04″W / 40.902976°N 74.101061°W / 40.902976; -74.101061[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated March 20, 1716 as Saddle River Township
Renamed November 8, 1955 as Saddle Brook Township
Government[5]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor Karen A. Chamberlain (R, term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Peter LoDico[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.716 sq mi (7.034 km2)
 • Land 2.689 sq mi (6.964 km2)
 • Water 0.027 sq mi (0.071 km2)  1.00%
Area rank 363rd of 566 in state
35th of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 46 ft (14 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 13,659
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 14,021
 • Rank 180th of 566 in state
24th of 70 in county[11]
 • Density 5,080.2/sq mi (1,961.5/km2)
 • Density rank 109th of 566 in state
28th of 70 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07663[12][13]
Area code(s) 201 and 973[14]
FIPS code 3400365340[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 882308[17]
Website www.saddlebrooknj.us

Saddle Brook is a township in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 13,659,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 504 (+3.8%) from the 13,155 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 141 (-1.1%) from the 13,296 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

History[edit]

Saddle River Township was created on March 20, 1716, consisting of all of the territory in Bergen County west of the Saddle River,[19] making it one of the oldest municipalities in Bergen County. It was incorporated on February 21, 1798, as one of the initial group of 104 townships incorporated in New Jersey.[19]

After its formation in 1716, Saddle River Township was split up in 1772 by royal decree with the northernmost half becoming Franklin Township, named after the last royal governor of New Jersey, William Franklin, son of Benjamin Franklin. Pompton Township was established in 1797 from parts of both Franklin and Saddle River Townships west of the Ramapo River, leaving sections of both townships disconnected to the west of Pompton Township. West Milford Township was formed from the discontinuous, western sections of both Franklin and Saddle River townships in 1834.[19]

In the initial wave of "Boroughitis" in which 26 new boroughs were created in 1894 alone and two more in 1895, Glen Rock (on September 14, 1894) and Lodi (December 22, 1894) split off from Saddle River Township, followed shortly thereafter by Wallington (January 2, 1895).[20] East Paterson (April 18, 1916; renamed to Elmwood Park effective January 1, 1973), Garfield (April 19, 1917) and Fair Lawn (April 5, 1924) subsequently split off.[19]

Saddle Brook adopted its current name on November 8, 1955, replacing Saddle River Township.[19]

Geography[edit]

Saddle Brook is located at 40°54′11″N 74°06′04″W / 40.902976°N 74.101061°W / 40.902976; -74.101061 (40.902976,-74.101061). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 2.716 square miles (7.034 km2), of which 2.689 square miles (6.964 km2) of it was land and 0.027 square miles (0.071 km2) of it (1.00%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 2,171
1820 2,291 5.5%
1830 3,399 48.4%
1840 828 * −75.6%
1850 823 −0.6%
1860 1,007 22.4%
1870 1,168 16.0%
1880 1,355 16.0%
1890 1,169 −13.7%
1900 1,954 * 67.2%
1910 3,047 55.9%
1920 2,845 * −6.6%
1930 2,424 −14.8%
1940 3,169 30.7%
1950 7,955 151.0%
1960 13,834 73.9%
1970 15,975 15.5%
1980 14,084 −11.8%
1990 13,296 −5.6%
2000 13,155 −1.1%
2010 13,659 3.8%
Est. 2012 14,021 [10] 2.7%
Population sources:
1800-1920[21] 1840[22] 1850-1870[23]
1850[24] 1870[25] 1880-1890[26]
1890-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1900-2010[29][30][31] 2000[32][33] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[19]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 13,659 people, 5,286 households, and 3,690 families residing in the township. The population density was 5,080.2 per square mile (1,961.5 /km2). There were 5,485 housing units at an average density of 2,040.0 per square mile (787.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 84.35% (11,521) White, 2.31% (316) Black or African American, 0.16% (22) Native American, 8.21% (1,121) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 3.19% (436) from other races, and 1.78% (243) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 12.20% (1,666) of the population.[7]

There were 5,286 households, of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.7% were married couples living together, 11.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.13.[7]

In the township, 20.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 27.3% from 25 to 44, 28.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.4 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.2 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $79,279 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,351) and the median family income was $92,861 (+/- $9,495). Males had a median income of $60,214 (+/- $5,753) versus $44,243 (+/- $3,010) for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,674 (+/- $2,295). About 0.0% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.6% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Same-sex couples headed 40 households in 2010, an increase from the 15 counted in 2000.[35]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 13,155 people, 5,062 households, and 3,578 families residing in the township. The population density was 4,830.8 people per square mile (1,867.3/km2). There were 5,161 housing units at an average density of 1,895.2 per square mile (732.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 90.73% White, 1.39% Black, 0.04% Native American, 4.74% (U.S. Census), 1.70% from other races, and 1.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.27% of the population.[32][33]

Among those resident who reported their ancestry in the 2000 Census, the most common were Italian (35.7%), Irish (15.7%), Polish (13.1%) and German (11.0%).[33] The number of residents who reported being of Italian ancestry in the 2000 Census (adjusted for the total number of ancestries reported) was the 15th highest of any municipality in New Jersey.[36]

There were 5,062 households out of which 27.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.6% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.3% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.11.[32][33]

In the township the population was spread out with 20.2% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 31.5% from 25 to 44, 23.6% from 45 to 64, and 18.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.1 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the township was $63,545, and the median income for a family was $73,205. Males had a median income of $49,834 versus $34,542 for females. The per capita income for the township was $27,561. About 1.4% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.8% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Saddle Brook operates within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Mayor-Council system of municipal government (Plan 2), implemented by direct petition as of January 1, 1991,[37] after voters approved a referendum supporting the change in June 1990.[38] The township is governed by a Mayor and a five-member Township Council. Members of the Township Council are elected at-large in partisan elections to four-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two seats (plus the mayoral seat) or three seats up for election in even-numbered years as part of the November general election.[5]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Saddle Brook is Republican Karen Chamberlain, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014. Members of the Township Council are Council President Richard Conte (R, 2014), Joseph Camilleri (D, 2016), Andrew Cimiluca (R, 2016), Anthony Halko (R, 2014) and Florence Mazzer (D, 2016).[39][40][41][42][43][44]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Saddle Brook is located in the 9th Congressional District[45] and is part of New Jersey's 38th state legislative district.[8][46][47]

New Jersey's Ninth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson).[48] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[49][50] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[51][52]

The 38th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Robert M. Gordon (D, Fair Lawn) and in the General Assembly by Tim Eustace (D, Maywood).[53] Connie Wagner (D, Paramus) stepped down from office as of October 1, 2013, and had been replaced on the ballot by Joseph Lagana, with her vacant seat to be filled on an interim basis.[54] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[55] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[56]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[57] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[58] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[59] As of 2013, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[60] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[61] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[62] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[63] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[64] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[64][65] Countywide constitutional officials are Sheriff Michael Saudino (R), Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill) and County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale).[66]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 8,377 registered voters in Saddle Brook Township, of which 2,890 (34.5% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,603 (19.1% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 3,882 (46.3% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[67] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 61.3% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 76.8% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[67][68]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 3,264 votes here (51.5% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 2,945 votes (46.5% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 76 votes (1.2% vs. 0.9%), among the 6,334 ballots cast by the township's 8,789 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.1% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[69][70] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 3,495 votes here (51.5% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 3,159 votes (46.6% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 60 votes (0.9% vs. 0.8%), among the 6,785 ballots cast by the township's 8,628 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.6% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[71][72] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 3,467 votes here (52.7% vs. 47.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 3,025 votes (46.0% vs. 51.7%) and other candidates with 53 votes (0.8% vs. 0.7%), among the 6,576 ballots cast by the township's 8,369 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.6% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[73]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 2,025 votes here (50.0% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,775 votes (43.8% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 212 votes (5.2% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 16 votes (0.4% vs. 0.5%), among the 4,049 ballots cast by the township's 8,478 registered voters, yielding a 47.8% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[74]

Education[edit]

The Saddle Brook Public Schools serves students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[75]) are Community School[76] (preschool), three K-6 elementary schools — Franklin Elementary School[77] (251 students), Long Memorial Elementary School[78] (325 students) and Helen I. Smith Elementary School[79] (333 students) — Washington School,[80] which houses a number of the district's early intervention special education programs (16 students) and Saddle Brook High/Middle School[81] for grades 7-12, combining both middle school and high school in a single building (786 students).[82][83]

Public school students from the township, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[84][85]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 41.73 miles (67.16 km) of roadways, of which 31.45 miles (50.61 km) were maintained by the municipality, 6.91 miles (11.12 km) by Bergen County, 2.40 miles (3.86 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation, and 0.97 miles (1.56 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[86]

Saddle Brook hosts the intersection of the Garden State Parkway (Exit 159) and Interstate 80 (Exit 62),[87] along with portions of U.S. Route 46. New Jersey Route 4 and Route 17 are within a quarter mile of its borders.

The Parkway extends across the center of the township for 1.0 mile (1.6 km), heading northeast from Elmwood Park to Rochelle Park.[88] Two toll gates are located in the township, with one toll gate on the northbound lanes of the parkway (just north of Exit 159), and the other toll gate used at the interchange for Exit 159.[89]

Interstate 80 heads east through Saddle Brook for 1.6 miles (2.6 km) from Elmwood Park to Lodi.[90] U.S. Route 46 clips the township's southwest corner, heading southeast for 0.6 miles (0.97 km) from Garfield to Lodi on Saddle Brook's southern border.[91]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit's Plauderville rail station is near the township's southwest corner, just across the border in Garfield, south of the intersection of Plauderville Avenue and Midland Avenue.[92]The station provides service on the Bergen County Line to Hoboken Terminal, with transfers available at Secaucus Junction to New York Penn Station, Newark Penn Station, and Newark Airport, and with transfers at Hoboken to PATH trains, Hudson Bergen Light Rail, and New York Waterway ferries.[93]

New Jersey Transit bus service is offered to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 144, 145, 148, 160, 161 and 164 routes; and to other New Jersey communities served on the 707, 712 and 758 routes.[94]

Television station[edit]

From 1999 to January 1, 2009, Saddle Brook had a public-access cable TV station with news bulletins (channel 77 on Cablevision and channels 38 and 39 on Verizon FiOS). This station, called SBC-TV, was created after Hurricane Floyd hit Saddle Brook in September 1999 so the town would have a system for emergency alerts. The station was shut down in 2009 because of budget constraints. The station resumed operations in 2011 with an all-volunteer staff, airing Township Council meetings and providing information of Township services, events and activities via a scrolling message board.[95]

Points of interest[edit]

Riverside Cemetery is a plot-holder-owned Jewish cemetery with over 65,000 burials. Acquired by the Lakewood Cemetery Association in 1906, the 105-acre (42 ha) property includes an Italianate style home used as administrative offices that has been restored and expanded after the building was extensively damaged in a 1950 fire.[96]

Passaic Junction is a rail yard owned by New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway that has a connection to and is the official interchange location with Norfolk Southern.[97]

The Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation maintains a campus in Saddle Brook, in addition to other main campuses in Chester and West Orange. The Saddle Brook campus was established after the acquisition of Saddle Brook/Kennedy Memorial Hospital in 1993, and operates 112 beds, specializing in rehabilitation from stroke, brain injury, amputation, neurological conditions (including Multiple Sclerosis, ALS and Parkinson's disease), joint replacement and orthopedic trauma[98]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Saddle Brook include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Township Directory, Saddle Brook. Accessed July 8, 2014.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 160.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Saddle Brook, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Saddle Brook township, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 13, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 15. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Saddle Brook township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 13, 2013.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 13, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 2, 2011.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Saddle Brook, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed March 3, 2013.
  19. ^ a b c d e f Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 86. Accessed February 2, 2012.
  20. ^ Harvey, Cornelius Burnham. Genealogical History of Hudson and Bergen Counties, New Jersey, p. 11, New Jersey Genealogical Publishing Company, 1900. Accessed December 17, 2013. "For a period of sixteen years following the passage of this act few boroughs were organized in the State, only three of them being in Bergen County.... As it was twenty-six boroughs were in the county from January 23, 1894, to December 18, of the same year."
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  23. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 239, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 19, 2013. "Saddle river township, before the formation of Passaic county in 1847, comprised within its limits what is now the township of Manchester. Its form was at that time like a saddle, and from thence it derived its name It is se en miles long and two miles wide. On its north is Franklin. East Midland, and Lodi, South Lodi, and West Acquackannonck, and Manchester townships, the cities of Paterson and Passaic. In 1850 its population was 823; in 1860, 1,007; and in 1870, 1,168."
  24. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 137. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 19, 2013.
  25. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 19, 2013.
  26. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 19, 2013. Population of 2,197 shown for 1840 conflicts with the 1,169 listed in the table.
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  31. ^ Historical Population Trends in Bergen County (1900-2010), Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed December 17, 2013. Data for years prior to 1930 were adjusted by Bergen county analysts.
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  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Saddle Brook Township, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 2, 2012.
  35. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed March 13, 2013.
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  47. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  48. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  49. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  50. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  51. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  52. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  53. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed October 1, 2013.
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  55. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  56. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
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  59. ^ What Is a Freeholder?, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
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  61. ^ Joan M. Voss, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  62. ^ John A. Felice, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  63. ^ Maura R. DeNicola, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  64. ^ a b Ensslin, John C. "Bergen County Freeholders choose Ganz as chairman; Democrat gives Republicans 2 top slots", The Record (Bergen County), January 3, 2013. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  65. ^ Freeholder Home Page, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  66. ^ Constitutional Officers, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  67. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Bergen, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  68. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  69. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  70. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  71. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  72. ^ 2008 General Election Results for Saddle Brook, The Record (Bergen County). Accessed September 3, 2011.
  73. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  74. ^ 2009 Governor: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  75. ^ Data for the Saddle Brook Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  76. ^ Community School, Saddle Brook Public Schools. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  77. ^ Franklin Elementary School, Saddle Brook Public Schools. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  78. ^ Long Memorial Elementary School, Saddle Brook Public Schools. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  79. ^ Helen I. Smith Elementary School, Saddle Brook Public Schools. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  80. ^ Washington School, Saddle Brook Public Schools. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  81. ^ Saddle Brook High/Middle School, Saddle Brook Public Schools. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  82. ^ School Directory, Saddle Brook Public Schools. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  83. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Saddle Brook Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  84. ^ About Us, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  85. ^ Admissions, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  86. ^ Bergen County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  87. ^ ENLARGED VIEW 44 (Elmwood Park Borough and Saddle Brook Township, Bergen County), New Jersey Department of Transportation, June 2009. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  88. ^ Garden State Parkway Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, January 1997. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  89. ^ Travel Resources: Interchanges, Service Areas & Commuter Lots, New Jersey Turnpike Authority. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  90. ^ Interstate 80 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, March 2010. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  91. ^ U.S. Route 46 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, March 2010. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  92. ^ Plauderville station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed July 8, 2014.
  93. ^ Main/Bergen-Port Jervis Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  94. ^ Routes by County: Bergen County, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed September 2, 2011.
  95. ^ Home page, Saddle Brook Creative TV. Accessed April 12, 2012.
  96. ^ Our History. Riverside Cemetery. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  97. ^ System Map, Norfolk Southern. Accessed December 17, 2013.
  98. ^ Locations, Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation. Accessed December 17, 2013. "At our three campuses in West Orange, Saddle Brook and Chester, New Jersey, we treat individuals from throughout the state, across the country and around the world."
  99. ^ Vrentas, Jenny. "NFL Draft: Rutgers' Steve Beauharnais ready to jump from under-the-radar prospect to NFL", The Star-Ledger, April 21, 2013. Accessed April 28, 2013. "Beauharnais had already earned a scholarship to Rutgers while playing for Saddle Brook High School, so Karcich was surprised to learn the teen planned to enroll in the private school in Montvale for his senior year.... Beauharnais was part of St. Joseph’s Non-Public Group III state title that season."
  100. ^ Feuer, Alan; and George, Jason. "Internet Fame Is Cruel Mistress for a Dancer of the Numa Numa". The New York Times, February 26, 2005. Accessed December 13, 2013. "Mr. Brolsma, a pudgy guy from Saddle Brook, made a video of himself this fall performing a lip-synced version of 'Dragostea Din Tei,' a Romanian pop tune, which roughly translates to 'Love From the Linden Trees.'
  101. ^ Kim, Yung. "SADDLE BROOK SUPERSTAR", The Record (Bergen County), June 17, 2002. Accessed March 18, 2011. "Matthew Hendrickson invented an entire persona for his professional wrestling career, but refused to deny his hometown of Saddle Brook for the charade. Hoping to trade on a 'Rocky' theme, promoters wanted to introduce 'Mr. Irresistible' as hailing from Philadelphia, but Hendrickson refused. 'He said he was from Saddle Brook, N.J., and had to be introduced as from there,' said promoter David L. Davis."
  102. ^ Prunty, Brendan. "Somerville's Foley outduels Hoffmann to take Ike title", The Star-Ledger, June 25, 2008. Accessed December 17, 2013. "But Hoffmann did stay close and was one shot back as they came to the par-3 14th hole. However, an errant tee shot forced the Saddle Brook resident to scramble and make par, while Foley made another birdie."
  103. ^ Klapisch, Bob. "YES, Ma'am: Yankees field reporter Kim Jones of Saddle Brook gets all the right answers", (201) magazine, July 2008, backed up by the Internet Archive as of September 24, 2010. Accessed December 17, 2013. "Luckily for the Saddle Brook resident, journalism has been an enduring strength. Jones hosts a talk show on WFAN, and since 2000 has been covering the NFL for The Star-Ledger of Newark, where she still delivers a once-a-week notes column."
  104. ^ Tatum, Kevin. "Owls football gains 3 more commitments", The Philadelphia Inquirer, January 19, 2006. Accessed December 13, 2012. "The latest players to cast their lots with Temple are third-team all-state linebacker Andre Neblett of Rahway High (N.J.), tight end Steve Maneri of Saddle Brook High (N.J.), and offensive lineman John Palumbo of Queen of Peace in North Arlington, N.J."
  105. ^ Alden, Bill. "NJ Native Kalemba Has Come a Long Way in Becoming Star Goalie for PU Men's Hockey", Town Topics (newspaper), December 27, 2006. Accessed December 17, 2013. "Zane Kalemba is a native of nearby Saddle Brook but he has come a long way to become the starting goalie for the Princeton University men's ice hockey team. After helping Bergen Catholic to the N.J. state high school championship as a freshman, Kalemba headed to New England to play at The Hotchkiss School."

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