Safra A. Catz

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Safra Catz)
Jump to: navigation, search
Safra A. Catz
Safra Catz.JPG
Safra Catz, September 2010
Born Safra Ada Catz
(1961-12-01) December 1, 1961 (age 52)
Holon, Israel
Residence Redwood City, CA
Education University of Pennsylvania
Harvard Law School
Occupation Co-Chief Executive Officer, Oracle Corporation
Years active Since 1986 (1986)
Salary US$51.7 million (2011, in total compensation)[1]
Spouse(s) Gal Tirosh

Safra Ada Catz (born December 1, 1961) is an Israeli-born American business executive. She has been an executive at Oracle Corporation since April 1999, and a board member since 2001. Since April 2011 she has been Co-President and Chief Financial Officer, reporting to founder/CEO Larry Ellison.[2] On September 18, 2014 Oracle announced that Larry Ellison will step down as CEO and that Mark Hurd and Safra Catz have been named as the new CEOs.[3]

Career[edit]

Catz earned a bachelor's degree from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1983 and a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1986.[4] She was a banker at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette,[5] joining in 1986;[citation needed] Catz served as a Managing Director from February 1997 to March 1999 and a Senior Vice President from January 1994 to February 1997 and previously held various investment banking positions since 1986. She has been an Independent Non Executive Director of Hyperion Solutions Corp. since April 14, 2007.[6] She has been a Member of Executive Council of TechNet since March 14, 2013. She served as a Director of PeopleSoft Inc. since December 30, 2004 and Stellent Inc. since December 12, 2006.

Catz joined Oracle Corporation in April 1999.[2] Catz became a member of the company's Board of Directors in October 2001 and President of Oracle Corporation in early 2004.[2][7] She is credited for having driven Oracle's 2005 efforts to acquire software rival PeopleSoft in a $10.3 billion takeover.[5] Catz is also the company's Chief Financial Officer, serving temporarily in that role from November 2005 to September 2008, and from April 2011 to the present.[2] Mark Hurd joined her as Co-President in 2010.[2] Safra Catz announced on May 20, 2014 that Oracle is looking to further expand its operations in Romania and will start looking at locations outside Bucharest in order to do this, after it has reached almost 3,000 employees in Romania’s capital city.

In 2009 she was ranked by Fortune as the 12th most powerful woman in business.[8] In 2009 she was also ranked by Forbes as the 16th most powerful business-woman.[9] In 2014, she was ranked at #24.[10] According to an Equilar analysis published by Fortune, she was in 2011 the highest-paid woman among Fortune 1000 companies, receiving an estimated US$51,695,742 in total remuneration.[1]

Catz is a lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.[citation needed] Catz has been a director of HSBC Group since May 2008.[11]

Personal life[edit]

Catz was born in Holon, Israel,[4] to Jewish parents.[12] She moved from Israel to Brookline, Massachusetts at the age of six. She graduated from Brookline High School.[8]

Catz is married to Gal Tirosh and has two sons, Jonathan and Daniel.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "25 highest-paid women - Safra A. Catz". Fortune. CNNMoney. September 27, 2012. Retrieved 2012-09-30.  [dated info]
  2. ^ a b c d e Oracle Co-President Safra Catz Adds CFO Duties as Jeff Epstein Leaves, an April 25, 2011 article from allthingsd.com
  3. ^ "Oracle Board Appoints Larry Ellison Executive Chairman and CTO. Safra Catz and Mark Hurd Appointed CEO.". Oracle Corporation. Retrieved 18 September 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c Rochelle Garner (2006-12-19). "Heir apparent at Oracle is credited with growth strategy". International Herald Tribune. 
  5. ^ a b Safra Catz from the Forbes 2005 list of The Most Powerful Women. Retrieved on 2012-09-30.
  6. ^ "Hyperion". 
  7. ^ Safra A. Catz | Executive Biography from Oracle.com
  8. ^ a b Lashinsky, Adam (September 28, 2009). "The Enforcer". Fortune 160 (6): 117–124. 
  9. ^ "The 100 Most Powerful Women". Forbes.com. August 19, 2009. 
  10. ^ "The World's 100 Most Powerful Women". Forbes. Forbes. Retrieved 24 June 2014. 
  11. ^ "Hsbc". 
  12. ^ Ruth Eglash (August 23, 2012). "Jewish women who rule! (according to Forbes)". Jpost. Retrieved 10 September 2013. 

External links[edit]