Sagenista

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Sagenista
CafeteriaRoenbergensis.jpg
Cafeteria roenbergensis
Scientific classification
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Chromalveolata
Division: Heterokontophyta
(unranked): Sagenista
Cavalier- Smith, 1995[1]
Groups
Chromista2.jpg

Sagenista is a group of heterokonts which contains the bicosoecids.[2] It also contains[citation needed] slime nets (Labyrinthulids[3]).

It has a special organelle called a Bothrosome. It is usually found in a marine environments rich in algae and sea grass. It is capable of movement by use of this organelle.

They are generally decomposers.

Bothrosome[edit]

They are capable of excreting an extoplasmic net of filaments for cells to glide upon. These tiny filaments provide a network for cells to travel upon to soak up nutrients from the surrounding environment.

Uses of Sagenista and Labyrinthulomycota[edit]

They are cultivated for their active production of Omega-3 fatty acids. These acids are used as an approved additive for animal feed.

Genera[edit]

  • Labyrinthula: Possesses a bothrosome. It is being studied for its pathogenic nature in marine environments. It has killed an entire species of Sea grass as well as some species, such as a particular snail that relies on the grass.
  • Caecitellus
    • Roughly spyhrical,
    • Only 2-7 meters (6.5-23') in diameter,
    • Has two flagellum,
    • Glide on filaments produced by bothrosome,
    • The two flagella provide a wrap around the organism to form a sort of exoskeleton,
  • Cafeteria. Planktonic species which has only been found in salt water. The two flagellum propel the cell. Reproduce asexually through binary division. Feed on bacteria and small Eukaryotes.

Other information[edit]

Until recently Sagenista was labeled as a fungus. It produces asexually and sexually through the use of spores.

There is a debate about whether some species of Sagenista contains a photosynthetic pigment labeled chlorophyll C.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cavalier-Smith, T. (1995). Membrane heredity, symbiogenesis, and the multiple origins of algae. In: Arai, R., Kato, M., Doi, Y. (eds). Biodiversity and evolution. The National Science Museum Foundation. Tokyo, pp 75-114.
  2. ^ "Browse taxonomic tree". Catalogue of Life : 2008 Annual Checklist. 
  3. ^ Sandra L. BALDAUF (2008). "An overview of the phylogeny and diversity of eukaryotes". Journal of Systematics and Evolution 46 (3): 263–273. doi:10.3724/SP.J.1002.2008.08060 (inactive 2009-03-13). 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gelenter, Wendy, and Stowell, Larry J. "Progress in understanding rapid blight of cool-season turf." PACE Turfgrass Research Institute Public Edition 9 (2003): 1-4.
  • General Mycology. Dept. of Plant Biology, Washington State University.
  • Introduction to the Sagenista. Museum of Paleontology, UC-Berkeley.
  • Labyrinthulomycetes
  • Labyrinthulomycota. Department of Plant Biology, University of Georgia.
  • Ralph, Peter J., and Short, Frederick T. "Impact of the wasting disease pathogen, Labyrinthula zosterae, on the photobiology of Zostera marina." Marine Ecology Progress Series 226 (2002): 265-271.
  • Regan, Casie. Vampire Scientists Study Sea Grass Slime Mold in Florida Bay. National Park Service.