Said Tayeb Jawad

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Said Tayeb Jawad
Said Tayeb Jawad.jpg
19th Ambassador of Afghanistan to the United States
In office
December 4, 2003 – September 22, 2010
President Hamid Karzai
Preceded by Isaq Sharhyar
Succeeded by Eklil Ahmad Hakimi
Afghanistan Chief of Staff
In office
2002–2003
President Hamid Karzai
Succeeded by Mohammad Omar Daudzai
Personal details
Born 1958
Kandahar, Afghanistan
Spouse(s) Shamim Jawad
Children Iman Jawad
Profession Academic and Diplomat
Religion Muslim

Said Tayeb Jawad (Persian: سید طیب جواد‎, born 1958) is an Afghan diplomat. He was appointed Afghan Ambassador to the United States on December 4, 2003, by President Hamid Karzai and served as Ambassador until September 22, 2010. He also served as Afghanistan’s non-resident Ambassador to Mexico, Brazil, Colombia and Argentina. He previously was Chief of Staff to the Afghan President in 2002 and 2003. In October 2010, he joined Harvard University's Future of Diplomacy Project at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs in the John F. Kennedy School of Government as the inaugural Fisher Family Fellow.[1] In February 2011, he became Diplomat-in-Residence at Johns Hopkins University's Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.[2] He also currently serves as the Chief Executive Officer of Capitalize LLC,[3] a Washington-based strategic consulting company and the Chairman of the Foundation for Afghanistan.[4] He is also a Global Political Strategist at APCO Worldwide.[5]

Biography[edit]

Said Tayeb Jawad was born in Kandahar, and was educated at Lycée Esteqlal and at the School of Law and Political Sciences in Kabul University. In 1980, shortly after the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, he left the country and went into exile in Germany, where he studied law at Westfaelische Wilhelms University in Münster.[6][7]

In 1986 he settled in the United States, where he earned his MBA from the Golden Gate University in San Francisco and worked for a number of prominent law firms, including as a legal consultant at Steefel, Levitt & Weiss, a San Francisco Embarcadero law firm.[6]

He is fluent in Pashto, Dari Persian, English, German and French languages. He is married to Shamim Jawad, Founder and President of the Ayenda Foundation, a charitable organization that works on projects for women and children in Afghanistan. They have a son, Iman, who is a student at Tufts University,[8] class of 2012, where he was enrolled in the EPIIC '09–'10 program. He is also a member of the Afghan Student Initiative at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

Jawad had naturalized as a U.S. citizen, but renounced U.S. citizenship to accept his posting as Afghan Ambassador to the United States.[9]

Public service[edit]

Return to Afghanistan[edit]

Jawad went back to Afghanistan in March 2002. He worked for Afghan President Hamid Karzai's office and became his press secretary. By June, in addition to trying to coordinate the loya jirga, or grand council, for thousands of delegates and journalists, Jawad had become Karzai's Chief of Staff.[10]

Until late 2003 he served as the President’s Press Secretary, Chief of Staff as well as the Director of the Office of International Relations at the Presidential Palace. Jawad has worked closely with President Karzai in formulating strategies, implementing policies, building national institutions and prioritizing reforms in Afghanistan. He also worked with the U.S. and Afghanistan's military experts to help reform the Ministry of Defense, disarm local warlords and rebuild the Afghan National Army. Jawad was instrumental in drafting Afghanistan’s foreign investment laws; he served as President Karzai’s principal liaison with the constitutional commission throughout the drafting of the Constitution of Afghanistan. As Chief of Staff he accompanied the President and managed all foreign trips and state visits. He observed cabinet meetings and participated in the National Security Council meetings.[11]

In October 2003 he was appointed Afghanistan's Ambassador to the United States.[12]

Ambassador to the U.S.[edit]

On December 4, 2003, Jawad assumed his official duties as Ambassador of Afghanistan to the United States and non-resident ambassador to Mexico, Brazil, Colombia and Argentina, making him Afghanistan's 19th top representative to the U.S. since diplomatic relations were established between the two countries in 1934."Embassy of Afghanistan – History – About the Embassy". Retrieved May 21, 2009. 

As part of his role as Afghanistan's envoy to the U.S., Jawad has worked closely with two presidential administrations on U.S. strategy towards Afghanistan; developed close links to members of the U.S. Congress; hosted numerous visits of high-level ministers and President Karzai; appeared in newspaper, magazine, radio and television interviews; spoken before audiences at universities, think tanks, charitable organizations and community groups; and received awards and commendations for his work for Afghanistan.

Jawad has appeared numerous times in major American and international papers and television shows. He also regularly lectures and speaks at prominent universities and think tanks. According to the Washington Times Jawad has maintained a high profile for Afghanistan, even as most public attention since 2003 has been focused on the Iraq War.Washington Times: Afghan Progress

In late 2009 there were rumours that Jawad would be appointed foreign minister of AfghanistanMondiaal Nieuws Nieuwe regering, maar oude gewoonten in AfghanistanTolo TV: Afghan people want removal of present cabinet members but Karzai appointed Zalmai Rasul instead.

Jawad has participated in hundreds of conferences and forums related to Afghanistan and the region. Jawad is an avid polo player and a member of the Capitol Polo Club in Maryland. He played in the Green Cup and is a member of the United States Polo Association. Jawad has participated in many significant conferences and forums related to Afghanistan and the region in the past decade.[1]

Political views[edit]

Having lived in Europe and the USA for more than 25 years, Jawad is familiar with western views on society and politics. He has been supportive of the American War on Terror[13][14] and of involvement of women in Afghan politics. Jawad has said that the biggest concern that Afghans have about the international presence is that it might be short-lived.[15]

Jawad has been loyal to President Karzai. He publicly defended Karzai against allegations of corruption and said that he is the most hard-working president Afghanistan has ever had.[16] Nevertheless, in October 2009 he was the first Karzai aide to suggest that a run-off between Karzai and his challenger Abdullah Abdullah was very likely after allegations of election fraud.[17] He said that a power sharing agreement between Karzai and Abdullah would be a good political solution but said he doubted that it would bring more skillful people to the government and that a coalition government meant sacrificing merits.[18][19]

Jawad and his wife have worked several times with former first lady Laura Bush in promoting awareness of rights for Afghan woman and children.[20][21] However Jawad criticized the Bush administration sometimes on using so much aerial bombing, resulting in civilian casualties, Jawad has expressed his gratitude to the US and foreign military powers in Afghanistan on a large number of occasions. Towards President Obama, who was less supportive of Afghan President Karzai, Jawad was more critical: "When the new administration came in there were a lot of changes and sometimes there was an oversimplification of the issues. Now the Obama administration is realizing you cannot just get rid of a democratically elected president of a country because you don't really like him." he said to United Press International.[18] Further Jawad has voiced opposition to President Obama's plan to begin withdrawing troops from Afghanistan starting summer 2011.[22] Jawad stressed the importance of continued international presence to avoid a situation as in the early 90s.

Jawad has stressed that too much of the international aid and military effort had bypassed the Afghan government which makes it impossible to build competent government and security.[23] Jawad also has said that eradication of poppies is not the best solution to the Afghan narcotics problem.[24] In May 2005 Jawad signed a memorandum of understanding for the city of light, a large reconstruction plan for the center of Kabul.

Jawad has criticized Pakistan for not doing enough to stop the Taliban insurgency.[25] Although he recognizes that new Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari seems much more committed to battling terrorism than his predecessor, General Pervez Musharraf. But, according to Jawad, Pakistan's army still appears to be more preoccupied with the country's traditional nemesis, India.[26]

In November, 2013, Jawad participated with the Loya Jirga in Kabul to discuss and offer his insights on the status and terms of the Bilateral Security Agreement, the Presidential elections and political transition, as well as the international community's level of economic assistance, military engagement and jurisdiction for operating foreign troops in the country up to and post-2014.

Awards and honorary degrees[edit]

Awards and honorary degrees granted to Jawad include the Constitutional Loya Jirga Service, Medal, Government of Afghanistan, Kabul, Afghanistan, 2003; Global Citizen Award, Roots of Peace, Washington, D.C., 2008; Honorary Doctorate Degree in Organization Leadership, Argosy University, Washington, D.C. 2007; and the Award of Merit for Rebuilding a Nation, American Society for Engineering Education, Washington, D.C, 2007.

See also[edit]

Publications[edit]

Afghanistan: Realities of War and Rebuilding

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Former Afghan Ambassador to the United States Becomes Inaugural Fisher Family Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School". Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government. November 3, 2010. Retrieved 2 October 2012. 
  2. ^ "Former Afghan Ambassador Said Tayeb Jawad Joins JHU SAIS as Diplomat in Residence". Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies. February 23, 2011. Retrieved 2 October 2012. 
  3. ^ Capitalize LLC
  4. ^ "Former Afghan Ambassador to the United States Becomes Inaugural Fisher Family Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School". Harvard University, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. November 5, 2010. Retrieved 2 October 2012. 
  5. ^ "Former Afghan Ambassador Joins APCO's Global Political Strategies Group". APCO Worldwide. April 14, 2011. Retrieved 2 October 2012. 
  6. ^ a b Afghan Bios
  7. ^ Management and Leadership Developments in Afghanistan: An Interview with Ambassador Sayed Tayeb Jawad
  8. ^ "Matriculation 2008". Tufts University. Retrieved August 28, 2008. 
  9. ^ Epstein, Edward (2004-03-17). "Serving his country from afar". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 2013-04-09. 
  10. ^ San Jose Mercury News: CALLED TO KABUL, FORMER OAKLAND RESIDENT IS HELPING REBUILD AFGHANISTAN AS PRESIDENT'S CHIEF OF STAFF HUNDREDS OF AFGHAN-AMERICANS HAVE ANSWERED HOMELAND CALL
  11. ^ New Afghan Ambassador Presents Credentials to Secretary of State.
  12. ^ Contra Costa Times: Oakland, Calif., Resident Now Afghanistan's Ambassador to the U.S.
  13. ^ E-notes: Is America helping Afghanistan?
  14. ^ Embassy of Afghanistan Announces: Afghan Ambassador to the United States Presents Credentials to President Bush.
  15. ^ New York Times Don't shortchange Afghanistan again
  16. ^ Karzai has less than $50,000 in his bank account: Jawad
  17. ^ BBC News: Afghan envoy says run-off likely.
  18. ^ a b UPI: Obama transition rough, Afghan envoy says
  19. ^ Karzai Aide Says Afghan Runoff Vote Is Likely
  20. ^ TMC News: First Lady Laura Bush Attends the Afghan Children Initiative at the Embassy of Afghanistan
  21. ^ YouTube: Ambassador Said Tayeb Jawad and First Lady Laura Bush on Meet The Press
  22. ^ Boston.com: GOP lawmakers wary of Obama's Afghan deadline
  23. ^ http://www.navytimes.com/news/2009/12/gns_afghanistan_ambassador_security_120409/ news/2009/12/gns_afghanistan_ambassador_security_120409Afghan envoy: 5 years to defeat militants
  24. ^ Afghan Ambassador Speaks
  25. ^ ABC News: 'Taliban' kill Afghan family members
  26. ^ Voice of America: New US President to Face Volatile South Asia

External links[edit]

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Ishaq Sharhyar
Ambassador of Afghanistan to the United States
2003–2010
Succeeded by
Eklil Ahmad Hakimi