Saint-Étienne Cathedral

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Cathedral of Saint Charles Borromeo
Cathédrale Saint-Charles-Borromée
Saint-etienne cathedrale.JPG
Facade of the cathedral Saint Charles Borromeo
Basic information
Location Saint-Etienne, France
Geographic coordinates 45°26′27.7″N 4°23′4.4″E / 45.441028°N 4.384556°E / 45.441028; 4.384556Coordinates: 45°26′27.7″N 4°23′4.4″E / 45.441028°N 4.384556°E / 45.441028; 4.384556
Affiliation Roman Catholic
Year consecrated 20 December 1923
Ecclesiastical or organizational status Cathedral
Leadership Bishop Dominique Lebrun
Website catholique-saint-etienne.cef.fr
Architectural description
Architect(s) Pierre Bossan,[1] Adrien Rey,[1] Francisque Dodat[1]
Architectural type Church
Architectural style Neo-Gothic
Groundbreaking 1912
Completed 1923
Specifications
Length 80 metres (260 ft)
Width 30 metres (98 ft)
Materials concrete
Official name: Cathédrale Saint-Charles
Reference No. IA42000147 [1]

The Cathedral of Saint Charles Borromeo (French: Cathédrale Saint-Charles-Borromée) is a Roman Catholic cathedral church in Saint-Étienne, France.

It has been the seat of the Bishop of Saint-Étienne since the foundation of the diocese on 26 December 1970.

The church, dedicated to Saint Charles Borromeo, was constructed between 1912 and 1923 in a primitive neo-Gothic style, on a Latin cross groundplan with transept and triple nave, and a belltower on the west front. The building is 80 metres (260 ft) long, 30 metres (98 ft) wide and 17 metres (56 ft) from the centre of the roof vault to the ground. The organ in the choir dates from 1930, and there is another very imposing one by A. Durand from 1968. The building was however an excessively ambitious one right from the start, and remains unfinished: it was intended that there should be another three belltowers and a dome, besides quantities of external and internal decoration presently lacking.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Inventaire Général du Patrimoine Culturel". Base de donnée Mérimée (in French). Ministère de la Culture. Retrieved 14 January 2011. 

References[edit]