St. George, Maine

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St. George, Maine
Town
St. George, Maine is located in Maine
St. George, Maine
St. George, Maine
Location within the state of Maine
Coordinates: 44°00′59″N 69°11′56″W / 44.0164709°N 69.1989341°W / 44.0164709; -69.1989341Coordinates: 44°00′59″N 69°11′56″W / 44.0164709°N 69.1989341°W / 44.0164709; -69.1989341
Country United States
State Maine
County Knox
Incorporated February 7, 1803
Area[1]
 • Total 117.25 sq mi (303.68 km2)
 • Land 25.02 sq mi (64.80 km2)
 • Water 92.23 sq mi (238.87 km2)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 2,591
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 2,592
 • Density 103.6/sq mi (40.0/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)

St. George is a town in Knox County, Maine, United States. The population was 2,591 at the 2010 census. It includes the villages of Port Clyde, Clark Island, Glenmere, Martinsville and Tenants Harbor, the latter its commercial center. A favorite with artists, writers and naturalists, St. George is home to the Brothers and Hay Ledge nature preserve, comprising four islands off Port Clyde.

History[edit]

The peninsula and its islands were noted for immense flocks of duck, geese and other waterfowl. Although the region was part of the Waldo Patent, General Samuel Waldo complied with requests from Abenaki Indians not to settle immigrants at what was their prized hunting ground. Consequently, the peninsula remained unpopulated until after the close of the French and Indian Wars in 1763. The Revolutionary War further slowed development, but during the 1780s, there was rapid settlement of the peninsula. It was incorporated in 1789 as part of Cushing. On February 7, 1803, the peninsula and its islands were set off and incorporated as St. George, taking its name from the river.

Farmers grew potatoes. After 1830, granite was quarried and shipped nationally for construction. Shipbuilders annually produced three to four vessels, many for the coasting trade, exporting cordwood, lumber and fish. Factories canned lobsters, clams and sardines. In the 1880s, the town's rugged oceanfront beauty was discovered by "rusticators"—visitors, including artists, who bought or built summer cottages.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 117.25 square miles (303.68 km2), of which, 25.02 square miles (64.80 km2) of it is land and 92.23 square miles (238.87 km2) is water.[1] Bounded on the west by the Saint George River, the town is located on a peninsula extending into the Gulf of Maine.

St. George is crossed by state route 131. It borders the town of South Thomaston to the north.

Both Allen Island and Mosquito Island House are listed on the National Register of Historic Places for St. George.

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 2,591 people, 1,204 households, and 768 families residing in the town. The population density was 103.6 inhabitants per square mile (40.0/km2). There were 2,107 housing units at an average density of 84.2 per square mile (32.5/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 98.8% White, 0.2% African American, 0.1% Asian, and 0.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.5% of the population.

There were 1,204 households of which 21.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.9% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.2% were non-families. 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.15 and the average family size was 2.60.

The median age in the town was 51.7 years. 17.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 4.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 17.8% were from 25 to 44; 35.4% were from 45 to 64; and 24.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 48.6% male and 51.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 2,580 people, 1,119 households, and 757 families residing in the town. The population density was 100.9 people per square mile (38.9/km²). There were 1,777 housing units at an average density of 69.5 per square mile (26.8/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.68% White, 0.16% African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.04% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.23% of the population.

There were 1,119 households out of which 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.8% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.3% were non-families. 26.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.77.

In the town the population was spread out with 22.1% under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 24.5% from 25 to 44, 28.2% from 45 to 64, and 21.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 96.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.7 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $41,211, and the median income for a family was $48,162. Males had a median income of $33,929 versus $25,439 for females. The per capita income for the town was $23,272. About 3.8% of families and 8.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.7% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people[edit]

Sites of interest[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-16. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-16. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  4. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ Roberts, George Simon. Historic towns of the Connecticut River Valley. Robson & Adee, Schenectady, New York, 1906. convenience link
  6. ^ Mears, Bill; Jeane Meserve (2007-07-31). "Chief justice tumbles after seizure". CNN. Retrieved 2008-12-05. 
  7. ^ Sherman, Mark (2007-07-31). "Chief Justice Roberts Suffers Seizures". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2008-12-05. 
  8. ^ Tenants Harbor Light.

External links[edit]