St. John, Kansas

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St. John, Kansas
City
Location of St. John, Kansas
Location of St. John, Kansas
Detailed map of St John, Kansas
Detailed map of St John, Kansas
Coordinates: 38°0′4″N 98°45′40″W / 38.00111°N 98.76111°W / 38.00111; -98.76111Coordinates: 38°0′4″N 98°45′40″W / 38.00111°N 98.76111°W / 38.00111; -98.76111
Country United States
State Kansas
County Stafford
Government
 • Type Mayor–Council
Area[1]
 • Total 1.88 sq mi (4.87 km2)
 • Land 1.88 sq mi (4.87 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,903 ft (580 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 1,295
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 1,265
 • Density 688.8/sq mi (265.9/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 67576
Area code(s) 620
FIPS code 20-62275[4]
GNIS feature ID 0473574[5]
Website StJohnKansas.com

St. John is a city in and the county seat of Stafford County, Kansas, United States.[6] As of the 2010 census, the city population was 1,295.[7]

History[edit]

19th century[edit]

The first settlement in what is today St. John was made in 1875 when William Bickerton of the Church of Jesus Christ founded a religious colony named Zion Valley.[8] By 1879, Zion Valley had grown into a small town, and the residents renamed it St. John, after then governor John P. St. John, in order to gain favor in winning the county seat of Stafford County.[9]

Geography[edit]

St. John is located at 38°0′4″N 98°45′40″W / 38.00111°N 98.76111°W / 38.00111; -98.76111 (38.001029, -98.761045)[10]. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.88 square miles (4.87 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1990 1,357
2000 1,318 −2.9%
2010 1,295 −1.7%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,295 people, 534 households, and 336 families residing in the city. The population density was 688.8 inhabitants per square mile (265.9 /km2). There were 642 housing units at an average density of 341.5 per square mile (131.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.4% White, 0.2% African American, 1.2% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 4.2% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 15.1% of the population.

There were 534 households of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 37.1% were non-families. 34.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 3.09.

The median age in the city was 42.7 years. 25.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 20.5% were from 25 to 44; 26.2% were from 45 to 64; and 19.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.4% male and 50.6% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 1,318 people, 569 households, and 337 families residing in the city. The population density was 732.1 people per square mile (282.7/km²). There were 686 housing units at an average density of 381.1 per square mile (147.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.36% White, 0.38% African American, 0.23% Asian, 2.12% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.57% of the population.

There were 569 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.8% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.6% were non-families. 38.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.3% under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 21.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 88.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $31,050, and the median income for a family was $41,761. Males had a median income of $27,986 versus $23,152 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,889. About 7.3% of families and 9.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.7% of those under age 18 and 10.1% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

St. John is home to St. John/Hudson High School. The mascot is a Tiger.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  7. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 27, 2011. 
  8. ^ Kansas State Historical Society (1916). Biennial Report of the Board of Directors of the Kansas State Historical Society. Kansas State Printing Plant. p. 302. 
  9. ^ Entz, Gary (2002). "Zion Valley: The Mormon Origins of St. John, Kansas" in Kansas History. Topeka, KS: Kansas State Historical Society. pp. 98–117. 
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 

Further reading[edit]

City
  • Cole, Clelland, and Helen Malin Reuber. No Cyclone Shall Destroy: The Story of St. John, Kansas. Ardmore, Pa: Dorrance & Co., 1981.
  • Gary R. Entz, "Zion Valley: The Mormon Origins of St. John, Kansas," Kansas History 24 (summer 2001), 98-117. (Download 1MB PDF eBook)
  • Gary R. Entz, "The Bickertonites: Schism and Reunion in a Restoration Church, 1880-1905", Journal of Mormon History 32 (fall 2006): 1-44. (Download 4MB PDF eBook)
Kansas

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Maps