Saint Kitts and Nevis Labour Party

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Saint Kitts and Nevis Labour Party
Leader Denzil Douglas
Ideology Social democracy
Political position Centre-left
International affiliation Socialist International (observer)[1]
Seats
4 / 11
Website
www.labourskn.com
Politics of Saint Kitts and Nevis
Political parties
Elections

The Saint Kitts and Nevis Labour Party (SKNLP) is a centre-left political party in Saint Kitts and Nevis. It is currently the ruling party in the country after winning six of the eleven seats in the 2010 general election.

History[edit]

The party was founded by members of the St. Kitts and Nevis Trades and Labour Union, and was known as the Saint Kitts-Nevis-Anguilla Labour Party until Anguilla seceded in 1980.[2] The party was led by Robert Bradshaw from 1946 until 1978. The party saw most of its success on Saint Kitts, whilst Nevis and Anguilla tended to elect independents and local parties.[3] It was the only party to contest the 1952 elections and won all eight seats.[4] They retained power in the 1957 despite losing three seats to independents. They went onto win elections in 1961, 1966, 1971 and 1975, winning seven seats on each occasion.

In the 1980 elections the party was reduced to four seats, and although it was the largest faction in the National Assembly, the opposition People's Action Movement was able to form a coalition government. The Labour Party was reduced to two seats in the 1984 elections, and remained with only two MPs after the 1989 elections. Although it received the most votes in the 1993 elections and won the same number of seats as the PAM, the PAM remained in power. However, early elections were called in 1995, in which the Labour Party won a majority of seats. They increased their majority in the 2000 elections and retained power in elections in 2004 and 2010.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://socialistinternational.org/viewArticle.cfm?ArticlePageID=931
  2. ^ Nohlen, D (2005) Elections in the Americas: A data handbook, Volume I, p569 ISBN 978-0-19-928357-6
  3. ^ Nohlen, p570
  4. ^ Nohlen, pp576-578

External links[edit]