Salem, New Jersey

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Salem, New Jersey
City
City of Salem
Old Salem Courthouse
Old Salem Courthouse
The City of Salem highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
The City of Salem highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Salem, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Salem, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°34′06″N 75°28′21″W / 39.568236°N 75.472553°W / 39.568236; -75.472553Coordinates: 39°34′06″N 75°28′21″W / 39.568236°N 75.472553°W / 39.568236; -75.472553[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Salem
Formed October 1675
Incorporated February 21, 1798 (as township)
Incorporated February 25, 1858 (as city)
Government[5]
 • Type City
 • Mayor Charles Washington, Jr. (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Clerk Kathleen Keen[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.815 sq mi (7.291 km2)
 • Land 2.343 sq mi (6.070 km2)
 • Water 0.472 sq mi (1.221 km2)  16.75%
Area rank 350th of 566 in state
12th of 15 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 10 ft (3 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 5,146
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 5,165
 • Rank 374th of 566 in state
5th of 15 in county[11]
 • Density 2,195.9/sq mi (847.8/km2)
 • Density rank 275th of 566 in state
3rd of 15 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08079[12][13]
Area code(s) 856 exchanges 339, 878, 935[14]
FIPS code 3403365490[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885385[17][2]
Website www.cityofsalemnj.org

Salem is a city in Salem County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 5,146,[7][8][9] reflecting a decrease of 711 (-12.1%) from the 5,857 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 1,026 (-14.9%) from the 6,883 counted in the 1990 Census, an overall drop of more than 25% over the two decades.[18] It is the county seat of Salem County,[19] the state's most rural county.[20] The name "Salem", in both the city and county, is derived from the Hebrew word shalom, meaning "peace".[21]

The town and colony of Salem was laid out in 1675 by John Fenwick and the community was given permission to choose officers in October 1693. It was incorporated on February 21, 1798, as part of the initial group of 104 townships established by the New Jersey Legislature. On February 25, 1858, it was reincorporated as Salem City.[22]

Geography[edit]

Salem is located along the Salem River.[23] According to the United States Census Bureau, Salem city had a total area of 2.815 square miles (7.291 km2), of which 2.343 square miles (6.070 km2) is land and 0.472 square mile (1.221 km2) (16.75%) is water.[1][2]

The city borders Elsinboro Township, Pennsville Township, Mannington Township, Quinton Township, and Lower Alloways Creek Township.

History[edit]

Salem was founded by John Fenwick, a Quaker. Fenwick had been involved in a financial dispute with an Edward Billinge, another Quaker, who had received the undivided portion of New Jersey territory that James Stuart, Duke of York had granted to Lord John Berkeley in 1664. Berkeley had sold his share to Billinge in 1675 for 1,000 pounds, but Billinge had become bankrupt and so had the property turned over to Fenwick to hold for Billinge and his assigns in trust. Billinge and Fenwick came to disagree over the property.

William Penn was asked to adjudicate the matter and he awarded 90% of the claim to Billinge and the remaining 10% and a cash settlement to Fenwick for his share. Fenwick was dissatisfied with Penn's judgmment and refused to abide by the decision. He organized a colony of settlers and sailed to the Delaware Bay where he settled on the eastern shore near the abandoned Swedish settlement of Fort Nya Elfsborg and set himself up as the local governor, issuing land patents and enforcing his own laws in defiance of Billinge and Penn. Billinge countered by suing Fenwick, leading to a long line of complaints and lawsuits in the colonial courts that repeatedly landed Fenwick in prison and sued for damages by many injured persons over the next decade. Nonetheless, Salem remained as a settlement and continued growing despite Fenwick's charades.[24]

In 1778, the British launched an assault against the local American militia in what became known as the Salem Raid. During that assault, Judge William Hancock of the King's Court who was presiding at the County Courthouse at the beginning of the American Revolutionary War, was accidentally killed by the British troops as part of the assault that became known as the Hancock House Massacre.[25] After the war concluded, treason trials were held at the county courthouse where suspected Loyalists were put on trial for having allegedly aided the British raid of Salem. Four men were convicted and sentenced to death for treason; however, they were pardoned by Governor William Livingston and exiled from New Jersey.[26]

The Old County Courthouse was the site of the legend of Colonel Robert Gibbon Johnson proving the edibility of the tomato. Before 1820, Americans often assumed tomatoes were poisonous. In 1820, Colonel Johnson, according to legend, stood upon the courthouse steps and ate tomatoes in front of a large amazed crowd assembled to watch him do so.[27] Modern scholars doubt the veracity of this story, however.[28]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 929
1820 1,303 40.3%
1830 1,570 20.5%
1840 2,006 27.8%
1850 3,052 52.1%
1860 3,865 26.6%
1870 4,555 17.9%
1880 5,056 11.0%
1890 5,516 9.1%
1900 5,811 5.3%
1910 6,614 13.8%
1920 7,435 12.4%
1930 8,047 8.2%
1940 8,618 7.1%
1950 9,050 5.0%
1960 8,941 −1.2%
1970 7,648 −14.5%
1980 6,959 −9.0%
1990 6,883 −1.1%
2000 5,857 −14.9%
2010 5,146 −12.1%
Est. 2012 5,165 [10] 0.4%
Population sources: 1810-2000[29]
1810-1920[30] 1840[31] 1830-1870[32]
1850[33] 1870[34] 1880-1890[35]
1890-1910[36] 1910-1930[37]
1930-1990[38] 2000[39][40] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 5,146 people, 2,157 households, and 1,264 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,195.9 per square mile (847.8 /km2). There were 2,633 housing units at an average density of 1,123.6 per square mile (433.8 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 31.21% (1,606) White, 62.13% (3,197) Black or African American, 0.41% (21) Native American, 0.39% (20) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.85% (95) from other races, and 4.02% (207) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.68% (344) of the population.[7]

There were 2,157 households, of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 22.8% were married couples living together, 30.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.4% were non-families. 35.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 3.05.[7]

In the city, 28.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.7% from 18 to 24, 22.4% from 25 to 44, 27.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34.4 years. For every 100 females there were 80.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 73.5 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $25,682 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,287) and the median family income was $38,286 (+/- $5,682). Males had a median income of $47,708 (+/- $9,641) versus $32,236 (+/- $5,778) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $17,733 (+/- $2,366). About 26.5% of families and 28.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 43.4% of those under age 18 and 10.9% of those age 65 or over.[41]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 5,857 people, 2,383 households, and 1,463 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,244.3 people per square mile (866.4/km2). There were 2,863 housing units at an average density of 1,097.0 per square mile (423.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 37.46% White, 56.77% African American, 0.60% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 1.38% from other races, and 3.55% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.88% of the population.[39][40]

There were 2,383 households out of which 32.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 27.7% were married couples living together, 29.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.6% were non-families. 34.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.10.[39][40]

In the city the population was spread out with 31.0% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 20.6% from 45 to 64, and 14.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 80.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 73.6 males.[39][40]

The median income for a household in the city was $25,846, and the median income for a family was $29,699. Males had a median income of $35,389 versus $24,354 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,559. About 24.7% of families and 26.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.3% of those under age 18 and 12.1% of those age 65 or over.[39][40]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Salem is governed under the City form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor, who is elected at-large to a three-year term of office. The City Council is made up of eight members, with four members representing each of two wards, East and West. Council members are elected on a staggered basis to four-year terms of office, with one seat from each ward up for election each year. All members of the governing body are chosen on a partisan basis as part of the November general election.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Salem is Democrat Charles Washington, Jr., whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[42] Members of the City Council are Council President Karen L. Tuthill (West; D, 2013), President Pro Tempore Horace Johnson (East; D, 2014), Ruth Carter (East; D, serving until November 2014 for a term ending December 2016), Vaughn Groce (East; D, 2013, serving an unexpired term), Sherman Hampton (East; D, 2015), Robert Lanard (West; D, 2014), Karen Roots (West; D, 2015) and James G. Waddington (West; D, 2016), with one vacancy of the seat expiring in 2013 held by Charles Washington, Jr.[43]

Vaughn Groce was chosen in January 2013 to fill the seat Charles Washington, Jr., expiring in December 2013 that was vacated when he took office as mayor.[44] Ruth Carter was named in October 2013 to fill the seat vacated in the previous month by BobJohnson, who resigned due to family obligations. Carter will serve until November 2014, when a successor will be chosen to fill the balance of the seat through December 2016.[45]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Salem City is located in the 2nd Congressional District[46] and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district.[8][47][48]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[49] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[50][51] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[52][53]

The 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Stephen M. Sweeney (D, West Deptford Township) and in the General Assembly by John J. Burzichelli (D, Paulsboro) and Celeste Riley (D, Bridgeton).[54] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[55] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[56]

Salem County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders who are elected at-large to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. As of 2013, Salem County's Freeholders (with party, residence, term-end year and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses) are Director Julie A. Acton (R, Pennsville Township, 2013; Administration), Deputy Director Ben Laury (R, Elmer, 2015; Public Works) Bruce L. Bobbitt (D, Pilesgrove Township, 2014; Health), Dale A. Cross (R, Pennsville Township, 2014; Public Safety), Beth E. Timberman (D, Woodstown, 2015; Social Services), Robert J. Vanderslice (R, Pennsville, 2014; Public Services) Lee R. Ware (D, Elsinboro Township); Transportation, Agriculture & Cultural Affairs).[57] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Gilda T. Gill (2014),[58] Sheriff Charles M. Miller (2015)[59] and Surrogate Nicki A. Burke (2015).[60][61]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,975 registered voters in Salem, of which 1,502 (50.5% vs. 30.6% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 229 (7.7% vs. 21.0%) were registered as Republicans and 1,244 (41.8% vs. 48.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[62] Among the city's 2010 Census population, 57.8% (vs. 64.6% in Salem County) were registered to vote, including 80.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 84.4% countywide).[62][63]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 1,635 votes here (78.8% vs. 50.4% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 390 votes (18.8% vs. 46.6%) and other candidates with 18 votes (0.9% vs. 1.6%), among the 2,074 ballots cast by the city's 3,141 registered voters, for a turnout of 66.0% (vs. 71.8% in Salem County).[64] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 1,266 votes here (70.4% vs. 45.9% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 506 votes (28.1% vs. 52.5%) and other candidates with 16 votes (0.9% vs. 1.0%), among the 1,799 ballots cast by the city's 2,957 registered voters, for a turnout of 60.8% (vs. 71.0% in the whole county).[65]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 731 ballots cast (66.3% vs. 39.9% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 241 votes (21.8% vs. 46.1%), Independent Chris Daggett with 73 votes (6.6% vs. 9.7%) and other candidates with 35 votes (3.2% vs. 2.0%), among the 1,103 ballots cast by the city's 3,101 registered voters, yielding a 35.6% turnout (vs. 47.3% in the county).[66]

Transportation[edit]

The Port of Salem was designated by the British Crown in 1682 as a port of entry on the Salem River accessible via the Delaware River.[67] It handles a variety of bulk cargo, notably of construction aggregate, break bulk cargo, and containers for clothing, fishing apparel, agricultural produce, and other consumer goods. South Jersey Port Corporation operates the Salem Terminal on a 22-acre complex located west of downtown.[68]

The Glass House Spur of the Salem Branch begins at the Port of Salem and is operated by the Southern Railroad of New Jersey with connections to Conrail's South Jersey/Philadelphia Shared Assets Area operations at Swedesboro.[citation needed]

The Delaware City–Salem Ferry is a seasonal service from Barber's Basin to Delaware City, Delaware.[69]

The city had a total of 24.79 miles (39.90 km) of roadways, of which 16.57 miles (26.67 km) are maintained by the municipality, 5.95 miles (9.58 km) by Salem County and 2.27 miles (3.65 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[70]

State highways passing through Salem include Route 45,[71] which has its southern terminus at its intersection with Route 49.Route 45[72] Nearby highways and structures include Interstate 295, the New Jersey Turnpike and the Delaware Memorial Bridge.

New Jersey Transit offers bus service between the city and Philadelphia on the 401 route and local service on the 468 route.[73]

Education[edit]

The Salem City School District serves public school students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. The district is one of 31 Abbott districts statewide,[74] which are now referred to as "SDA Districts" based on the requirement for the state to cover all costs for school building and renovation projects in these districts under the supervision of the New Jersey Schools Development Authority.[75][76]

Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[77]) are John Fenwick School[78] (grades PreK-2; 358 students), Salem Middle School[79] (3-8; 449), Salem High School[80] (9-12; 440).[81][82][83]

Public school students from Elsinboro, Lower Alloways Creek Township, Mannington Township and Quinton Township attend the district's high school for grades 9-12 as part of sending/receiving relationships.[84][85]

Notable historical buildings[edit]

The Old Salem County Courthouse serves today as the administrative offices for Salem City. It is the oldest active courthouse in New Jersey and is the second oldest courthouse in continuous use in the United States.[86] The Courthouse was erected in 1735 during the reign of King George II using locally manufactured bricks. The building was enlarged in 1817 and additionally enlarged and remodeled in 1908. Its distinctive bell tower is essentially unchanged and the original bell sits in the courtroom.[86]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Salem include:

Photo gallery[edit]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Salem has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[100]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ City of Salem Contacts, Salem Main Street and Stand Up For Salem. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2006, p. 19.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Salem, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Salem city, Salem County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 17, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 2. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Salem city, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 17, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Salem, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 17, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Salem, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 17, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 17, 2012.
  19. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  20. ^ Walsh, Daniel. "History and nature to merge on byway / Officials unveil scenic bayshore route for drivers", The Press of Atlantic City, July 23, 2009. Accessed November 29, 2011. "The county has rolled out an advertising campaign that includes radio, print and television commercials, along with a new Web site, and county leaders have sought to sell outsiders on New Jersey's least-populated and most-rural county."
  21. ^ "A Brief and Partial History of the City of Salem". The City of Salem Master Plan Historic Preservation Element. Preservation Salem County, Inc. Retrieved September 15, 2010. 
  22. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 217. Accessed August 17, 2012.
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  26. ^ "Crossroads of the American Revolution Association". Revolutionarynj.org. Retrieved November 29, 2011. 
  27. ^ "Robert Gibbon Johnson - Fact or Fiction?". Tomato and Health Magazine. 2009. Retrieved November 23, 2009. 
  28. ^ Smith, Andrew F. (Fall–Winter 1990). "The Making of the Legend of Robert Gibbon Johnson and the Tomato". New Jersey History (New Jersey Historical Society) 108: 59–74. 
  29. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Salem County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed February 8, 2013. Population for 1840 is listed as 2,007, in conflict with two other sources included here that list the population as 2,006.
  30. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed November 4, 2013.
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  33. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  34. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed February 8, 2013.
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  37. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  38. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  39. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Salem city, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  40. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Salem city, Salem County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 17, 2012.
  41. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Salem city, Salem County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 17, 2012.
  42. ^ Williams, Michael. "New Salem City Mayor Charles Washington calls for fresh path of growth and prosperity", South Jersey Times, January 1, 2013. Accessed February 8, 2013. "Mayor Charles Washington Jr. was sworn into office on Tuesday during the annual reorganization of city council, officially commencing his first term as mayor.... Also during Tuesday’s reorganization meeting, re-elected council members Robert Johnson and James Waddington were re-sworn to their seats on city council. Council also elected Councilwoman Karen Tuthill to continue serving as council president in a 4 to 1 vote.... Council unanimously voted Councilman Horace Johnson to serve as president pro tempore — a title that had been held by Washington over the past three years."
  43. ^ Mayor and Council, City of Salem. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  44. ^ Williams, Michael. "Salem City Council names new member to fill open seat", South Jersey Times, January 31, 2013. Accessed November 4, 2013. "A new member was appointed to Salem City Council to fill the seat vacated by Mayor Charles Washington Jr., city officials said.During a special meeting this week, council selected city resident Vaughn Groce to fill Washington’s unexpired term through the end of the year."
  45. ^ Young, Alex. "Carter appointed to fill vacant seat on Salem City Council", South Jersey Times, October 8, 2013. Accessed November 4, 2013. "Longtime city resident Ruth Carter was appointed to fill the city council seat left vacant after former Councilman Bob Johnson resigned last month.... The seat Carter is taking over became available when Johnson — a longtime city councilman — decided to resign on Sept. 16, due to an out-of-state family obligation.... Puma said Carter will serve in her appointment seat until Nov. 4, 2014 (Election Day), and whoever wins that election would serve the remainder of Johnson’s term until it expires on Dec. 31, 2016."
  46. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  47. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  48. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  49. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  50. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  51. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  52. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  54. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 16, 2014.
  55. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  56. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  57. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Salem County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  58. ^ Gilda T. Gill, Salem County Clerk, Salem County Clerk's Office . Accessed January 10, 2013.
  59. ^ Sheriff's Office, Salem County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  60. ^ A Message From Your Surrogate, Salem County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  61. ^ The Official Salem County Directory 2012, Salem County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  62. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Salem, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  63. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  64. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Salem County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  65. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Salem County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  66. ^ 2009 Governor: Salem County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  67. ^ Rouse, Ewart (December 18, 1996). "Partnership Will Take Over Dock At Salem The Public Part Of The Salem Port Will Be Leased To Private Investors. The Signing Is Today.". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 2013-08-31. 
  68. ^ Port of Salem Terminal, South Jersey Port Corporation. Accessed July 19, 2013.
  69. ^ Staff. "Delaware City-Salem Ferry expands operating schedule, offers shuttle service in Salem", South Jersey Times, June 22, 2013. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  70. ^ Morris County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  71. ^ Route 45 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, January 2010. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  72. ^ Route 49 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, January 2009. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  73. ^ Salem County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed August 17, 2012.
  74. ^ Abbott Districts, New Jersey Department of Education, backed up by the Internet Archiveas of May 15, 2009. Accessed August 17, 2012.
  75. ^ What are SDA Districts?, New Jersey Schools Development Authority. Accessed August 17, 2012. "SDA Districts are 31 special-needs school districts throughout New Jersey. They were formerly known as Abbott Districts, based on the Abbott v. Burke case in which the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that the State must provide 100 percent funding for all school renovation and construction projects in special-needs school districts.... The districts were renamed after the elimination of the Abbott designation through passage of the state’s new School Funding Formula in January 2008."
  76. ^ SDA Districts, New Jersey Schools Development Authority. Accessed August 17, 2012.
  77. ^ Data for the Salem City School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  78. ^ John Fenwick School, Salem City School District. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  79. ^ Salem Middle School, Salem City School District. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  80. ^ Salem High School, Salem City School District. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  81. ^ Our Schools, Salem City School District. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  82. ^ New Jersey School Directory: Salem City Board of Education, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed February 8, 2013.
  83. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Salem City School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  84. ^ Sending Districts, Salem City School District. Accessed November 4, 2013. "Salem High School welcomes students from the following schools in Salem County: Elsinboro Township School, Lower Alloways Creek Township School, Mannington Township School, Quinton Township Elementary School"
  85. ^ Bumpus, Robert L. Salem County Report on Consolidation and Regionalization, Salem County, New Jersey Executive County Superintendent, March 15, 2010. Accessed November 4, 2013. "In this area of Salem County four P-8 districts, Lower Alloway Creek, Quinton, Elsinboro, and Mannington Townships have a send/receive agreement with neighboring Salem City to send their students to Salem High School."
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  87. ^ BARBER, Isaac Ambrose, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed November 4, 2013.
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  89. ^ Harvin, Al. "Mistake in Identity Pays Compliment to a Rookie", The New York Times, August 1, 1989. Accessed November 4, 2013. "'I would've been upset getting drafted on the eighth round, but because it was the Jets, I was excited,' said Brown, who grew up in the South Jersey town of Salem, where he broke the high school record of the former Colts star Lydell Mitchell for yards rushing and touchdowns scored in a season.
  90. ^ Alexander Gilmore Cattell, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed July 30, 2007.
  91. ^ Manfredi, Fernando. "llega a uruguay john chowning, pionero en la sintetizacion de los sonidos, algo indispensable para el musico de ahora: La música de las computadoras - El destacado creador realizará un concierto con sus obras y una conferencia para todo público", El País (Uruguay), September 25, 2006. Accessed August 17, 2012. "Nacido en la ciudad de Salem, (Nueva Jersey) en el año 1934, Chowning estudió en la Universidad de Wittenberg."
  92. ^ Gordon, Geo W. "Hon. Henry T. Ellett; A Biographical Sketch", Proceedings of the Annual Session of the Bar Association of Tennessee, p. 102. Tennessee Bar Association. Accessed November 4, 2013. "Henry T. Ellett was born in Salem, New Jersey, on the eighth of March, 1812, and died in Memphis, Tennessee, on the fifteenth day of October, 1887, in the presence of assembled thousands, who had just listened to his eminently appropriate, eloquent and patriotic address of welcome to the President of the United States."
  93. ^ Duke Esper, Baseball-reference.com. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  94. ^ Staff. "Goose Goslin: Hero of Salem - Horse & Plow", Salem County, New Jersey, Summer 2009. Accessed January 12, 2011.
  95. ^ William John Hughes, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed July 30, 2007.
  96. ^ Lydell Mitchell, database Football. Accessed February 22, 2008.
  97. ^ Bass, Alison. "CHEMISTRY NOBEL IS SHARED BY 3; 2 WIN IN PHYSICS", The Boston Globe, October 15, 1987. Accessed June 26, 2007. "Pedersen, 83, reached at his home in Salem, N.J., told reporters: 'I've never had an experience like this. It is a great honor.'"
  98. ^ Clement Hall Sinnickson, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed June 26, 2007.
  99. ^ John Test, Indiana State Library. Accessed November 4, 2013. "John Test was born on November 12, 1771, in Salem, New Jersey."
  100. ^ Climate Summary for Salem, New Jersey

Bibliography[edit]

  • Shourds, Thomas (1876), History and genealogy of Fenwick's Colony, New Jersey, New Jersey: Bridgeton, ISBN 0-8063-0714-5

External links[edit]