Salim, Nablus

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Salim
Other transcription(s)
 • Arabic سالم
 • Also spelled Salem (official)
Salim is located in the Palestinian territories
Salim
Salim
Location of Salim within Palestine
Coordinates: 32°13′N 35°20′E / 32.217°N 35.333°E / 32.217; 35.333Coordinates: 32°13′N 35°20′E / 32.217°N 35.333°E / 32.217; 35.333
Governorate Nablus
Government
 • Type Village Council
Area
 • Jurisdiction 10,283 dunams (10.3 km2 or 4.0 sq mi)
Population (2006)
 • Jurisdiction 5,100
Name meaning Salem[1]

Salim (Arabic: سالم‎) is a Palestinian town in the northern West Bank, located six kilometers east of Nablus and is a part of the Nablus Governorate. Nearby towns include Deir al-Hatab to the northwest, Balata to the west and Beit Furik to the south. According to the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS), Salim had a population of approximately 5,100 inhabitants in 2006.[2]

History[edit]

See also: Shechem

The village is ancient with foundations of houses.[3] In 1882, traces of ruins, cisterns, a ruined tank, and a cemetery of rock-cut tombs were noted.[4]

Salim dates back to the Middle Bronze Age. It was near the ancient Canaanite and later Israelite town of Shechem.[5] It is mentioned in Genesis 33:18, "And Jacob came to Shalem, a city of Shechem, which is in the land of Canaan, when he came from Padanaram; and pitched his tent before the city."[citation needed]

Ottoman era[edit]

In 1517, Salim was incorporated into the Ottoman Empire with the rest of Palestine. In 1596, it appeared in Ottoman tax registers as being in the Nahiya of Jabal Qubal of the Liwa of Nablus. It had a population of 42 households, all Muslim. The villagers paid taxes on wheat, barley, summercrops, olives, and goats or beehives, and a press for olives or grapes.[6]

French explorer Victor Guérin came to the village in May 1870, after walking through fields of olives, figs and almond trees. He found a village with a maximum of 200 people, in ancient houses. A dozen cisterns in the village were dry, so the women had to fetch water from a stream, called Ain Salim, about 1 kilometre NNW of the village.[7]

In the SWP in 1882, Salim was described as a small village, but evidently ancient, surrounded by olive-trees and with two springs to the north.[8]

British Mandate era[edit]

In a census conducted in 1922 by the British Mandate authorities, Salem had a population of 423, all Muslims,[9] while in the 1931 census, Salim, including El Hamra, had 100 occupied houses and a population of 490, again all Muslim.[10]

In 1945 Salim had a population of 660, all Arabs, with 10,293 dunams of land, according to an official land and population survey.[11] Of this, 229 dunams were plantations and irrigable land, 5,158 used for cereals,[12] while 24 dunams were built-up land.[13]

1948-1967[edit]

During the 1948 war the area was held by units from the Iraqi Army.[14]

In the wake of the 1948 Arab–Israeli War Salim came under Jordanian occupation.

post-1967[edit]

After Six-Day War in 1967, Salim has been under Israeli rule.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 206
  2. ^ Projected Mid -Year Population for Nablus Governorate by Locality 2004- 2006 Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS).
  3. ^ Dauphin, 1998, p. 847
  4. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 244
  5. ^ Sychem also Sikima and Salim - (Tell Balatah) Studium Biblicum Franciscanum - Jerusalem. 19 December 2000.
  6. ^ Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 130.
  7. ^ Guérin, 1874, p. 456 ff
  8. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1882, SWP II, p. 230
  9. ^ Barron, 1923, Table IX, Sub-district of Nablus
  10. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 64
  11. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 61
  12. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 107
  13. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 157
  14. ^ Morris, Benny (1993) Israel's Border Wars, 1949 - 1956. Arab Infiltration, Israeli Retaliation, and the Countdown to the Suez War. Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-827850-0. pp.146.147

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]