Salix planifolia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Salix planifolia
Salix planifolia 2001-07-15.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Malpighiales
Family: Salicaceae
Genus: Salix
Species: S. planifolia
Binomial name
Salix planifolia
Pursh
Synonyms

Salix chlorophylla
Salix monica
Salix nelsonii
Salix pennata
Salix pychnocarpa

Salix planifolia is a species of willow known by the common names planeleaf willow, diamondleaf willow, and tea-leafed willow. It is native to northern and western North America, including most of Canada and the western United States. It grows in many types of arctic and alpine habitats in the north, and mountainous areas in the southern part of its range.[1]

Description[edit]

Salix planifolia is a shrub varying in size from low and bushy, to long thickets, to a treelike form 9 m (30 ft) in height. The leaves are generally oval in shape with pointed tips, measuring up to 6.5 cm long. They are smooth-edged or serrated, glossy on the upper surface, and sometimes with silky hairs. The inflorescence is a catkin of flowers a few centimeters long.

Salix pulchra, also commonly called diamondleaf or tealeaf willow and sometimes treated as a subspecies of S. planifolia (S. planifolia ssp. pulchra), is now treated as a distinct species.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Uchytil, Ronald J. (1991), "Salix planifolia", Fire Effects Information System (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory) 
  2. ^ Uchytil, Ronald J. (1991), "Salix pulchra", Fire Effects Information System [Online] (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory) 

External links[edit]