Salon Selectives

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Salon Selectives is a line of hair care products, ranging from shampoos and hair conditioners to mousses, sprays, gels, and oils. Salon Selectives was the first salon-inspired mass market hair care brand, introduced by Helene Curtis in 1987. It was acquired by Unilever in 1996 and was revamped in 2000 with all-new products bearing catchy names (like Perfectly Normal shampoo and Hold Tight Hair spray). In 2011 the line was relaunched again with 32 oz bottles designed to give consumers salon grade product at everyday value pricing.

Salon Selectives Family of Products

Original level-based lineup (1987-2000)[edit]

When originally introduced in 1987, Salon Selectives was conceived as a level-based product line of shampoos, conditioners, and styling products. SS shampoos had rosy-red bottles with level numbers, while Salon Selectives conditioners were in lighter pink ones bearing letter labels signifying type. Popularized by Helene Curtis, the brand proved to be a success, with 6.5 percent market share and annual sales of $275 million in the late 90s (making it the second most successful hair care brand in the US).[citation needed]

Revamped theme-based lineup (2000-2006)[edit]

During 2000, the Salon Selectives product line was revamped—gone were those red and pink bottles. The then-new theme-based product line was introduced during September 2000; products bore catchy names, and were all housed in clear containers.

The revitalization of the Salon Selectives brand (early 2011)[edit]

In 2010, the rights to the Salon Selectives brand was acquired by CLT International, a global health and beauty trader and brand acquisition company. CLT brought back a line of hair care products (including shampoo, conditioner, styling aids and hair brushes) in early 2011. The red and pink bottles and green apple scent have been restored. In addition to conventional advertising vehicles, CLT International is launching an aggressive social media campaign (featuring sites like Facebook and Twitter) to target a younger and broader demographic.[citation needed]

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