Samin Baghtcheban

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Samin Baghtcheban
Samin baghcheban.jpg
Born 1925
Tabriz, Iran
Died 19 March 2008
Istanbul, Turkey
Occupation Composer, musician, author
Spouse(s) Evelyn Baghtcheban

Samin Baghtcheban (Persian: ثمین باغچه‌بان ‎, variations: Baghcheban, Baqcheban, Bahceban) (1925 – 19 March 2008) was an Iranian musician, composer, author and translator.

Biography[edit]

Samin Baghtcheban was born in 1925 in Tabriz, and grew up in Shiraz and Tehran, where his father established the first modern kindergartens and schools for the deaf in Iran. His father, Jabbar Baghtcheban, was a leading Iranian educator and pioneer of Persian cued speech.

In 1944 Samin Baghtcheban was awarded a scholarship to study music composition in Ankara State Conservatory. He returned to Iran in 1949 and started teaching in Music Conservatory of Tehran.[1]

He was married to the opera singer, Evelyn Baghtcheban, whom he met while studying in Ankara.[2]

In 1984 he moved to Turkey with his family where he continued his activities and composed several new pieces, some of which were performed by Manouchehr Sahbai in Switzerland.[1]

He died on 19 March 2008 in Istanbul.[3]

Music career[edit]

Throughout his career he composed numerous pieces based on Iranian folklore or mythology. His most popular work is Rangin Kamoon (Rainbow), a collection of symphonic and choral tunes for children.

Literary works[edit]

Between 1948 and 1979, in addition to his composition activities, he wrote and translated several books and articles. Baghtcheban translated several books by Turkish authors Nazim Hikmet, Yaşar Kemal and introduced the humorist Aziz Nesin to Iranians.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Samin Baghtchehban. Snapshots from My Father (چهره هایی از پدرم) (in Persian). ISBN 964-341-209-1. 
  2. ^ "Opera singer Evelyn Baghcheban dies in Istanbul". Tehran Times. Retrieved 2010-11-02. 
  3. ^ "ثمین باغچه بان درگذشت" (in Persian). BBC Persian. Retrieved 2010-11-02. 
  4. ^ "Norouz is not coming!" (in Persian). Harmonytalk music magazine. Retrieved 2010-11-02. 

External links[edit]