Samuel Newell Bell

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Samuel Newell Bell
SamuelNewellBell.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's 2nd district
In office
March 4, 1871 – March 4, 1873
Preceded by Aaron F. Stevens
Succeeded by Austin F. Pike
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's 2nd district
In office
March 4, 1875 – March 4, 1877
Preceded by Austin F. Pike
Succeeded by James F. Briggs
Personal details
Born (1829-03-25)March 25, 1829
Chester, New Hampshire, New Hampshire, U.S.
Died February 8, 1889(1889-02-08) (aged 59)
North Woodstock, New Hampshire, U.S.
Resting place Valley Cemetery, Manchester, New Hampshire
Citizenship US
Political party Democratic
Relations Samuel Bell
James Bell
Alma mater Phillips Academy
Dartmouth College
Profession Lawyer
Politician
Businessman

Samuel Newell Bell (March 25, 1829 – February 8, 1889) was an American lawyer, politician and businessman. He served as a United States Representative from New Hampshire in the 1800s.

Early life[edit]

Born in Chester, New Hampshire to Samual Dana Bell and Mary H. (Healey) Bell, he attended local schools in Francestown, New Hampshire and Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts.[1] After graduatng from Dartmouth College in 1847,[2] he studied law in the office of his father and was admitted to the bar in 1849.[3] He began the practice of law in Meredith, New Hampshire.[4]

Career[edit]

Elected as a Democrat candidate to the Forty-second Congress, Bell was a United States Representative for the second district of New Hampshire. He served from March 4, 1871 to March 3, 1873. He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1872 to the Forty-third Congress, but was elected to the Forty-fourth Congress, serving from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1877.[5][6] He was not a candidate for reelection in 1876.

After leaving Congress, Bell resumed the practice of law in Meredith. He was also involved in real estate and was one of the founders of the New Hampshire Fire Insurance Company. He served as director and vice-president of the company from 1881 until his death.[7] Bell served as president of several railroads, including the Portsmouth and Concord Railroad, the Suncook Valley Railroad, the Pemigewasset Valley Railroad and the Franconia Notch Railroad.[8]

He was appointed chief justice of the New Hampshire Superior Court by Governor Ezekiel A. Straw and later by Governor James A. Weston but declined to accept the appointment both times,[9][10][11] and retired from public life.

Death[edit]

Bell died while on a visit in North Woodstock on February 8, 1889 (age 59 years, 320 days). He is interred in Valley Cemetery in Manchester, New Hampshire.[12]

Personal life[edit]

Bell was the grandson of Samuel Bell, the 14th Governor of New Hampshire,[13] and the nephew of James Bell, United States Senator.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bell, Charles Henry (1893). The bench and bar of New Hampshire: including biographical notices of deceased judges of the highest court, and lawyers of the province and state, and a list of names of those now living. Houghton, Mifflin and company. p. 199. 
  2. ^ D. Appleton & Company (1875). http://books.google.com/books?id=7k4KAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA599&lpg=PA599&dq=samuel+newell+bell+1847,+he+graduated+Dartmouth+College&source=bl&ots=mzbQ3PKaHy&sig=Xqddr-t925OX7ppkTNoEXe6rPuc&hl=en&sa=X&ei=hGnfUqOcBKq_sQSI64KABw&ved=0CFcQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=samuel%20newell%20bell%20&f=false. D. Appleton & Company. p. 599. 
  3. ^ Samuel Newell Bell. The International Insurance Encyclopedia. Retrieved 20 January 2014. 
  4. ^ By United States. Government Printing Office (1918). U.S. G.P.O. By United States. Government Printing Office. p. 470. 
  5. ^ Herringshaw, Thomas William (1909). Herringshaw's National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States; Illustrated with Three Thousand Vignette Portraits. American Publishers' Association,. p. 295. 
  6. ^ W.R. Benjamin (1893). The Collector, Issues 73-82. W.R. Benjamin. p. 102. 
  7. ^ Armstrong, David W. (1910). International Insurance Encyclopedia: A Descriptive Record of the History, Theory and Practice of Al Branches of Insurance Throughout the World and from the Earliest Times to the Present Day. American encyclopedic library assoc. p. 60. 
  8. ^ Bell, Charles Henry (1893). The bench and bar of New Hampshire: including biographical notices of deceased judges of the highest court, and lawyers of the province and state, and a list of names of those now living. Houghton, Mifflin and company. p. 199. 
  9. ^ Armstrong, David W. (1910). International Insurance Encyclopedia: A Descriptive Record of the History, Theory and Practice of Al Branches of Insurance Throughout the World and from the Earliest Times to the Present Day. American encyclopedic library assoc. p. 60. 
  10. ^ "Samuel Newell Bell". 2014 Ancestry.com. Retrieved 20 January 2014. 
  11. ^ United States. Congress (1913). A Biographical Congressional Directory: With an Outline History of the National Congress, 1774-1911 : the Continental Congress, September 5, 1774 - October 21, 1788, the United States Congress, from the First to the Sixty-second Congress, March 4, 1789 - March 3, L9ll. Government Printing Office,. p. 470. 
  12. ^ Spencer, Thomas E. (1998). Where They're Buried: A Directory Containing More Than Twenty Thousand Names of Notable Persons Buried in American Cemeteries, with Listings of Many Prominent People who Were Cremated. Genealogical Publishing Com. p. 221. 
  13. ^ "BELL, Samuel, (1770 - 1850)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 21, 2014. 
  14. ^ "BELL, James, (1804 - 1857)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved January 21, 2014. 

External links[edit]


 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Aaron F. Stevens
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's 2nd congressional district

1871 – 1873
Succeeded by
Austin F. Pike
Preceded by
Austin F. Pike
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's 2nd congressional district

1875 – 1877
Succeeded by
James F. Briggs