Samuel Zane Batten

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Samuel Zane Batten (1859–1925) was a Baptist minister.[1]

Biography[edit]

He served as a Baptist minister in Morristown, New Jersey, where he preached against alcohol consumption and gambling.[2] He was an adamant proponent of democracy for its Christian appeal.[3] In 1908, he established the Commission on Social Service of the American Baptist Association.[4]

He was a member of the Brotherhood of the Kingdom.[5]

Bibliography[edit]

  • The New Citizenship: Christian Character in its Biblical Ideas, Sources, and Relations (1898)
  • The Social Task of Christianity: A Summons to the New Crusade (1909)
  • The Christian State: The State, Democracy, and Christianity (1909)
  • A Working Temperance Program (1910)
  • The Industrial Menace to the Home (1914)
  • The Moral Meaning of War: A Prophetic Interpretation (1918)
  • The New World Order (1919)
  • If America Fail: Our National Mission and Our Possible Future (1922)
  • Building a Community (1922)
  • Why Not Try Christianity? (1923)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eldon J. Eisenach, The Social And Political Thought of American Progressivism, Hackett Publishing Company, 2006, p. 177 [1]
  2. ^ John W. Rae, Morristown: A Military Headquarters of the American Revolution, Arcadia Publishing, 2003, p. 140 [2]
  3. ^ Susan Curtis, A Consuming Faith: The Social Gospel and Modern American Culture, University of Missouri Press, 2001, p. 192 [3]
  4. ^ James H. Moorhead, World Without End: Mainstream American Protestant Visions of the Last Things, 1880-1925, Indiana University Press, 1999, p. 116 [4]
  5. ^ Eldon J. Eisenach, The Social And Political Thought of American Progressivism, Hackett Publishing Company, 2006, p. 190 [5]