San'a Institute for the Arabic Language

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San'a Institute for the Arabic Language
Location
Sa’ilah Street, Sana'a
Yemen Yemen
Information
Motto "Study Arabic in its homeland"
Established 1995
Director Muhammad Al-Anasi
Website

San'a Institute for the Arabic Language (SIAL) is located in the Old City of Sana'a, Yemen on Sa’ilah Street. The school specializes in teaching Arabic as a foreign language.[1]

SIAL also teaches courses in Arabic calligraphy, Islamic studies, and Yemeni culture.[2]

The school, located in a house in the Tabariya neighborhood, attracted many students from the United States and Britain before the September 11 attacks in 2011, but today most of the students are from the Indian subcontinent and the far East.[3]

The founder and director of SIAL is Muhammad Al-Anasi. He attended Reading University in the 1980s[4] and was Arabic language program coordinator for the Peace Corps in Yemen.[5]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sana'a Institute for the Arabic Language". Sialyemen.com. Retrieved 18 March 2010. 
  2. ^ "Sana'a Institute for the Arabic Language". Sialyemen.com. Retrieved 18 March 2010. 
  3. ^ Erlanger, Steven (31 December 2009). "Nigerian May Have Used Course in Yemen as Cover". New York Times. Yemen. Retrieved 24 February 2014. 
  4. ^ Hider, James (January 1, 2010). "Double life of 'gifted and polite' terror suspect Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab". The Times of London. Times Newspapers Ltd. Archived from the original on 29 June 2011. Retrieved 24 February 2014. 
  5. ^ "Sana'a Institute for the Arabic Language". Sialyemen.com. Retrieved 24 February 2014. 
  6. ^ Raissa Kasolowsky (June 4, 2010). "Yemen language schools near-empty after militant student". Reuters. Retrieved February 16, 2015. Adil Badi, a teacher at the Sanaa Institute for the Arabic Language, said radical Muslims such as Abdulmutallab, a student from a wealthy family who had no criminal record, had used the Arabic courses on offer in Yemen as a pretext for entering the country to meet fellow militants there. "They had something else to do in Yemen but their excuse was to study Arabic," Badi said. 
  7. ^ Associated Press (January 1, 2010). "Arabic study may have been cover for bomb suspect Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab". MLive.com. Retrieved February 16, 2015. 
  8. ^ Steven Erlanger (December 31, 2009). "Nigerian May Have Used Course in Yemen as Cover". The New York Times. Retrieved February 16, 2015. 
  9. ^ Mohammed al Qadhi (December 29, 2009). "Detroit bomb suspect 'smart but introverted' says Yemen classmate". The National. Retrieved January 18, 2010. 
  10. ^ Jon Gambrell (December 29, 2009). "Web posts suggest lonely, depressed terror suspect". The Star (Toronto). Associated Press. Retrieved January 18, 2010. 
  11. ^ Andrew England (January 2, 2010). "Quiet charm of student linked to airliner plot". The Financial Times. Retrieved January 18, 2010. 
  12. ^ Newell, Claire; Lamb, Christina; Ungoed-Thomas, Jon; Gourlay, Chris; Dowling, Kevin; Tobin, Dominic (January 3, 2010). "Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab: one boy’s journey to jihad". The Sunday Times (London). Retrieved January 2, 2010. 
  13. ^ "Paris Attacker Said Kouachi Knew Convicted Nigerian Airline Bomber". The Wall Street Journal. 11 January 2015. Retrieved 12 January 2015. 
  14. ^ "Paris suspect Said Kouachi was roommates with 'underwear bomber': reports". Yahoo! News. 12 January 2015. Retrieved 12 January 2015. 

External links[edit]