San Diego City Council election, 2010

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The 2010 San Diego City Council election occurred on November 2, 2010. The primary election was held on June 8, 2010. Four of the eight seats of the San Diego City Council were contested. This was the last election to use eight council districts. Two incumbents ran for reelection in their council district.

Municipal elections in California are officially non-partisan, although most members do identify a party preference. A two-round system was used for the election, starting with a primary in June followed by a runoff in November between the top-two candidates if no candidate received a majority of the votes in the first round.

Campaign[edit]

Council Districts used for the 2010 election

The 2010 election was the last to use the eight district boundaries created by the 2000 Redistricting Commission. Seats in districts 2, 4, 6, and 8 were up for election.

Results[edit]

District 2[edit]

District 2 consisted of the communities of Bankers Hill/Park West, Downtown San Diego, La Jolla/Mount Soledad, Little Italy, Midway/North Bay, Mission Beach, Mission Hills, Ocean Beach, Old Town, Pacific Beach, and Point Loma. Incumbent council member Kevin Faulconer was reelected with a majority of the votes in the June primary.

San Diego City Council District 2 primary election, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Nonpartisan Kevin Faulconer 17,089 61.52%
Nonpartisan Patrick Finucane 6,828 24.58%
Nonpartisan Jim Morrison 3,796 13.67%
Totals 30,987 100%

District 4[edit]

District 4 consisted of the communities of Alta Vista, Broadway Heights, Chollas View, Emerald Hills, Encanto, Jamacha, Lincoln Park, Lomita Village, Mount Hope, Mountain View, North Bay Terrace, Oak Park, O'Farrell, Paradise Hills, Ridgeview, Skyline Hills, South Bay Terrace, Valencia Park, and Webster. Incumbent council member Tony Young was reelected with a majority of the vote in June primary.

San Diego City Council District 4 primary election, 2010[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Nonpartisan Tony Young 10,275 72.00%
Nonpartisan Bruce Williams 3,947 27.66%
Totals 14,270 100%

District 6[edit]

District 6 consisted of the communities of Bay Ho, Bay Park, Clairemont Mesa, Fashion Valley, Kearny Mesa, Linda Vista, Mission Valley, North Clairemont, and Serra Mesa. Incumbent council member Donna Frye was ineligible to run for reelection due to term limits. Lorie Zapf was elected after advancing to the November general election and receiving a majority of the votes.

San Diego City Council District 6 primary election, 2010[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Nonpartisan Lorie Zapf 9,931 36.18%
Nonpartisan Howard Wayne 6,758 24.62%
Nonpartisan Steve Hadley 4,846 17.66%
Nonpartisan Kim Tran 3,582 13.05%
Nonpartisan Ryan Huckabone 2,275 8.29%
Totals 27,392 100%
San Diego City Council District 6 general election, 2010[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Nonpartisan Lorie Zapf 22,869 52.35%
Nonpartisan Howard Wayne 20,692 47.36%
Totals 43,687 100%

District 8[edit]

District 8 consisted of the southern communities of San Diego and those along the Mexico–United States border, including the communities of Barrio Logan, Egger Highlands, Grant Hill, Golden Hill, Logan Heights, Memorial, Nestor, Ocean View Hills, Otay Mesa West, Otay Mesa East, San Ysidro, Sherman Heights, Southcrest, Stockton, and Tijuana River Valley. Incumbent council member Ben Hueso was ineligible to run for reelection due to term limits. David Alvarez was elected after advancing to the November general election and receiving a majority of the votes.

San Diego City Council District 8 primary election, 2010[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Nonpartisan David Alvarez 3,343 25.30%
Nonpartisan Felipe Hueso 2,581 19.54%
Nonpartisan B.D. Howard 2,277 17.24%
Nonpartisan Nick Inzunza 2,234 16.91%
Nonpartisan James Wright 1,445 10.94%
Nonpartisan Adrian Vazquez 735 5.56%
Nonpartisan Lincoln Pickard 574 4.34%
Totals 13,189 100%
San Diego City Council District 8 general election, 2010[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Nonpartisan David Alvarez 13,014 57.33%
Nonpartisan Felipe Hueso 9,540 42.03%
Totals 22,700 100%

Aftermath[edit]

The new city council was sworn in December 2010. Tony Young was unanimously elected as council president and Kevin Faulconer was elected as council president pro tem by their fellow council members.[5]

District 4 special election[edit]

On November 17, 2012, Council President Tony Young announced that he would resign from the City Council early to become CEO of the San Diego-Imperial Counties chapter of the American Red Cross. His resignation on January 1, 2013 triggered a special election for the balance of his term, which ends in 2014.[6] Nine candidates qualified for the special primary election, scheduled for March 26, 2013.[7] Myrtle Cole, who had been endorsed by the local Democratic Party and the San Diego-Imperial Counties Labor Council, received the most votes in the primary. She advanced to the May 21, 2013 general election to face runner-up Dwayne Crenshaw, Executive Director of San Diego LGBT Pride.[8] Cole was elected to the City Council with a majority of the votes in the runoff.[9]

San Diego City Council District 4 special primary election, 2013[2][10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Nonpartisan Myrtle Cole 4,304 32.3%
Nonpartisan Dwayne Crenshaw 2,025 15.2%
Nonpartisan Brian "Barry" Pollard 1,548 11.6%
Nonpartisan Ray Smith 1,207 9.1%
Nonpartisan Blanca Lopez Brown 1,084 8.1%
Nonpartisan Sandy Spackman 1,067 8.0%
Nonpartisan Bruce Williams 1,059 8.0%
Nonpartisan Tony Villafranca 621 4.7%
Nonpartisan Monica Montgomery 404 3.0%
Totals 13,319 100%
San Diego City Council District 4 special general election, 2013[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Nonpartisan Myrtle Cole 6,612 54.1%
Nonpartisan Dwayne Crenshaw 5,603 45.9%
Totals 12,215 100%

District 2 appointment[edit]

On March 3, 2014, Kevin Faulconer resigned from the City Council to assume the office of Mayor of San Diego, having won the special election to replace Bob Filner.[11] This created a vacancy in District 2. Because the vacancy occurred with less than a year left in Faulconer's term, the vacancy was filled by a City Council appointment per the City Charter.[12] On April 7, 2014, the San Diego City Council voted 5-3 on a second ballot to appoint Ed Harris, head of the city's lifeguard's union, to serve the balance of Faulconer's term.[13] Per the City Charter, Harris is ineligible to run for reelection in 2014.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Election History - Council District 2". City of San Diego. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c "Election History - Council District 4". City of San Diego. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Election History - Council District 6". City of San Diego. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Election History - Council District 8". City of San Diego. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  5. ^ "Everyone Likes Tony Young". Voice of San Diego. 7 December 2010. Retrieved 14 December 2010. 
  6. ^ "Council President Tony Young to Vacate Seat, Work for Red Cross". NBC 7 San Diego. November 17, 2012. Retrieved 19 November 2012. 
  7. ^ "Official Ballot Municipal Special Election - City Council District 4". City of San Diego. Retrieved 17 February 2013. 
  8. ^ Dillon, Liam (26 March 2013). "Cole, Crenshaw Advance in District 4". Voice of San Diego. Retrieved 28 March 2013. 
  9. ^ Gustafson, Craig (21 May 2013). "Cole defeats Crenshaw in District 4 council race". UT San Diego. Retrieved 22 May 2013. 
  10. ^ "City of San Diego Municipal Special Election Results". County of San Diego. Retrieved 28 March 2013. 
  11. ^ "Election History - Mayor of San Diego". City of San Diego. Retrieved 8 April 2014. 
  12. ^ San Diego City Charter. City of San Diego http://docs.sandiego.gov/citycharter/Article%20III.pdf |url= missing title (help). Retrieved April 8, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Ed Harris Appointed To Fill San Diego City Council Vacancy". KPBS. City News Service. April 8, 2014. Retrieved April 8, 2014.