San Francisco general election, June 2010

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The June 2010 San Francisco general elections were held on June 8, 2010 in San Francisco, California. The elections included seats to various political parties' county central committees, two seats to the San Francisco County Superior Court, and seven ballot measures.

Superior Court[edit]

Seat 6[edit]

SFJun2010SupCourtSeat6.svg
San Francisco County Superior Court Seat 6 election, 2010
Candidate Votes Percentage
Linda Colfax 59,837 52.73%
Harry Dorfman 34,952 30.80%
Roderick A. McLeod 10,233 9.02%
Robert Retana 7,936 6.99%
Write-in 522 0.46%
Valid votes 113,480 72.56%
Invalid or blank votes 42,912 27.44%
Total votes 156,392 100.00%
Voter turnout 34.91%

Seat 15[edit]

SFJun2010SupCourtSeat15.svg

As no candidate had more than 50% of the votes, a runoff election will be held between the two highest vote-getting candidates in the November 2010 election.

San Francisco County Superior Court Seat 15 election, 2010
Candidate Votes Percentage
Michael Nava 50,808 45.87%
Richard B. Ulmer, Jr. (incumbent) 47,010 42.44%
Daniel Dean 12,285 11.09%
Write-in 669 0.60%
Valid votes 110,772 70.83%
Invalid or blank votes 45,620 29.17%
Total votes 156,392 100.00%
Voter turnout 34.91%

Propositions[edit]

Propositions: ABCDEFG
Note: "City" refers to the San Francisco municipal government.

Proposition A[edit]

SFJun2010PropA.svg

Proposition A would authorize the San Francisco Unified School District to assess a special property tax to pay for maintenance, repair, and seismic retrofitting of public school buildings and child care center buildings. This proposition requires a two-thirds majority to pass.

Proposition A
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 102,873 70.02
No 44,043 29.98
Required majority 66.67
Valid votes 146,916 93.94
Invalid or blank votes 9,476 6.06
Total votes 156,392 100.00

Proposition B[edit]

SFJun2010PropB.svg

Proposition B would authorize the City to issue $412.3 million in bonds for the maintenance, repair, and seismic retrofitting of the City's fire hydrant system, fire stations, and police stations, and would fund the construction of a new "Public Safety Building" in the Mission Bay neighborhood. This proposition requires a two-thirds majority to pass.

Proposition B
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 117,553 79.41
No 30,484 20.59
Required majority 66.67
Valid votes 148,037 94.66
Invalid or blank votes 8,355 5.34
Total votes 156,392 100.00

Proposition C[edit]

SFJun2010PropC.svg

Proposition C would entrench the City's 11-member Film Commission, previously created by ordinance, into the city charter, with the Mayor appointing six members and the San Francisco Board of Supervisors' Rules Committee appointing five, all subject to approval by the full Board. The composition and duties of the commission would also be entrenched into the city charter.

Proposition C
Choice Votes  %
Referendum failed No 76,834 53.75
Yes 66,125 46.25
Valid votes 142,959 91.41
Invalid or blank votes 13,433 8.59
Total votes 156,392 100.00

Proposition D[edit]

SFJun2010PropD.svg

Proposition D would change the retirement benefits formula for new City employees by increasing their contributions into the San Francisco Employees' Retirement System and require that any savings due to fewer City contributions into the fund be sent to the Retiree Health Care Trust Fund.

Proposition D
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 112,100 78.77
No 30,222 21.23
Valid votes 142,322 91.00
Invalid or blank votes 14,070 9.00
Total votes 156,392 100.00

Proposition E[edit]

SFJun2010PropE.svg

Proposition E would require the annual Police Department budget to specify the costs of security for City officials and visiting dignitaries.

Proposition E
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 80,364 55.82
No 63,600 44.18
Valid votes 143,964 92.05
Invalid or blank votes 12,428 7.95
Total votes 156,392 100.00

Proposition F[edit]

SFJun2010PropF.svg

Proposition F would amend the rent ordinance to allow a tenant to file, under certain conditions, for a financial hardship application, subject to the final decision of an Administration Law Judge, that may prohibit the landlord from increasing rent on the tenant for a specific amount of time.

Proposition F
Choice Votes  %
Referendum failed No 85,071 57.75
Yes 62,239 42.25
Valid votes 147,310 94.19
Invalid or blank votes 9,082 5.81
Total votes 156,392 100.00

Proposition G[edit]

SFJun2010PropG.svg

Proposition G would make it City policy to have the Transbay Transit Center as the northern terminal of the San Francisco–Los Angeles high-speed rail line.

Proposition G
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 120,788 83.76
No 23,421 16.24
Valid votes 144,209 92.20
Invalid or blank votes 12,183 7.79
Total votes 156,392 100.00

External links[edit]