San Francisco general election, November 2012

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The November 2012 San Francisco general elections were on November 6, 2012, in San Francisco, California. The elections included six seats to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, four seats to the San Francisco Board of Education, four seats to the San Francisco Community College Board, and seven San Francisco ballot measures.

Board of Supervisors[edit]

Board of Education[edit]

Three incumbents ran for reelection, while one, Norman Yee, ran for a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Each voter was allowed to cast up to four votes.

San Francisco Board of Education elections, 2012
Candidate Votes Percentage
Sandra Lee Fewer (incumbent) 128,500 16.94%
Jill Wynns (incumbent) 106,531 14.04%
Rachel Norton (incumbent) 102,033 13.45%
Matt Haney 100,552 13.25%
Kim Garcia-Meza 59,930 7.90%
Shamann Walton 58,194 7.67%
Sam Rodriguez 50,554 6.66%
Gladys Soto 49,839 6.57%
Beverly Popek 36,059 4.75%
Victoria Lo 35,779 4.72%
Paul Robertson 29,562 3.90%
Write-in 1,164 3.90%
Voter turnout 72.56%

Community College Board[edit]

Three incumbents ran for reelection, while one, Rodrigo Santos, is seeking his first election after being appointed by Mayor Ed Lee. Each voter wa allowed to cast up to four votes.

San Francisco Community College Board elections, 2012
Candidate Votes Percentage
Steve Ngo (incumbent) 103,030 14.63%
Rafael Mandelman 96,053 13.64%
Natalie Berg (incumbent) 95,259 13.53%
Chris Jackson (incumbent) 91,069 12.93%
Amy Bacharach 90,485 12.85%
Rodrigo Santos (incumbent) 56,755 8.06%
Nate Cruz 55,426 7.87%
William Walker 49,430 7.02%
Hanna Leung 47,643 6.77%
George Vazhappally 17,904 2.54%
Voter turnout 72.56%

Propositions[edit]

Propositions: ABCDEFG
Note: "City" refers to the San Francisco municipal government.

Proposition A[edit]

Proposition A would levy an annual $79 parcel tax for eight years to provide funding for several City College of San Francisco programs. This measure required a two-thirds majority to pass.

Proposition A
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 242,410 72.90
No 90,134 27.10
Required majority 66.67
Valid votes 332,544 92.61
Invalid or blank votes 26,530 7.39
Total votes 359,074 100

Proposition B[edit]

Proposition B would authorize the City to issue $195 million in bonds to fund repairs and improvements in parks and public open spaces. This measure required a two-thirds majority to pass.

Proposition B
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 242,404 72.11
No 93,735 27.89
Required majority 66.67
Valid votes 336,139 93.61
Invalid or blank votes 22,935 6.39
Total votes 359,074 100

Proposition C[edit]

Proposition C would establish a Housing Trust Fund to fund construction and maintenance of affordable housing, provide for loan assistance and foreclosure relief, and fund neighborhood improvements; reduce on-site affordable-housing requirements; and authorize the construction of 30,000 low-rental units in the city.

Proposition C
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 211,674 65.15
No 113,214 34.85
Valid votes 324,888 90.48
Invalid or blank votes 34,186 9.52
Total votes 359,074 100

Proposition D[edit]

Proposition D would shift the elections of City Attorney and Treasurer to the same year as those of the Mayor, District Attorney, and Assessor-Recorder.

Proposition D
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 263,642 83.20
No 53,252 16.80
Valid votes 316,894 88.25
Invalid or blank votes 42,180 11.75
Total votes 359,074 100

Proposition E[edit]

Proposition E would phase in a gross receipts tax and phase out a payroll tax in a revenue-neutral manner and increase business registration fees.

Proposition E
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 223,887 70.75
No 92,577 29.25
Valid votes 316,464 88.13
Invalid or blank votes 42,610 11.87
Total votes 359,074 100

Proposition F[edit]

Proposition F would require the City to study the draining of Hetch Hetchy Reservoir and the identifying of replacement water and power sources.

Proposition F
Choice Votes  %
Referendum failed No 249,304 76.90
Yes 74,885 23.10
Valid votes 324,189 90.28
Invalid or blank votes 34,885 9.72
Total votes 359,074 100

Proposition G[edit]

Proposition G would make it City policy to oppose corporate personhood and that corporations are subject to political spending limits.

Proposition G
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 260,595 80.99
No 61,181 19.01
Valid votes 321,776 89.61
Invalid or blank votes 37,298 10.39
Total votes 359,074 100

External links[edit]