San Francisco mayoral election, 2011

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San Francisco mayoral election, 2011
San Francisco
2007 ←
November 8, 2011 (2011-11-08) → 2015

  Mayor Ed Lee closeup.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Ed Lee John Avalos
Party Democratic Democratic
First round vote 59,775 37,445
First round percentage 30.75% 19.26%
Final round vote 84,457 57,160
Final round percentage 59.64% 40.36%

SFMayor2011Districts.svg

First choice results by supervisorial district

  Ed Lee   John Avalos


Mayor before election

Ed Lee
Democratic

Elected Mayor

Ed Lee
Democratic

The 2011 San Francisco mayoral election was held on Tuesday, November 8, 2011, to elect the mayor of San Francisco. The incumbent, Ed Lee, succeeded in his bid to become the first elected Asian-American mayor of a major American city.[1]

Background[edit]

Gavin Newsom, first elected in 2003 and reelected in 2007, was elected Lieutenant Governor of California in 2010 and sworn in on January 10, 2011.[2] Ed Lee was appointed by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors to finish the balance of Newsom's mayoral term and was sworn in on January 11, 2011. Lee initially pledged not to seek election, although an active movement arose to draft him into the race.[3][4] By the end of July observers were expecting that Lee would agree to run.[5] On August 8, 2011, Lee announced he was running for Mayor of San Francisco.[6]

The election was run using instant runoff voting. It was the first decided by the preference voting adopted by a referendum in 2002.[7]

Candidates[edit]

There were sixteen candidates running:[8]

Debates[edit]

  • May 5, 2011: The Leo T. McCarthy Center for Public Service and the Common Good at the University of San Francisco partnering with a national non-profit, buildOn, hosted 'San Francisco Mayoral Candidate Forum on Service' featuring selected mayoral candidates. In attendance were Michela Alioto-Pier, John Avalos, David Chiu, Bevan Dufty, Tony Hall, Dennis Herrera, Joanna Rees, Phil Ting, and Leland Yee.[10]
  • June 16, 2011: Automattic, the developer of WordPress, hosted 'SFOpen 2011', a town-hall forum focused specifically on open government, citizen engagement and leveraging technology to build better government, moderated by tech entrepreneur Mitch Kapor. The candidates in attendance were Michela Alioto-Pier, John Avalos, David Chiu, Bevan Dufty, Tony Hall, Dennis Herrera, Joanna Rees, Phil Ting and Leland Yee.[11]
  • July 11, 2011: Valencia Corridor Merchants Association and the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce hosted a mayoral candidate debate at Public Works at 161 Erie St. In attendance were John Avalos, David Chiu, Bevan Dufty, Dennis Herrera and Leland Yee.[12][13]
  • August 24, 2011: The Raoul Wallenberg Jewish Democratic Club hosted a mayoral candidate debate at the JCC at 3200 California Street. In attendance were Jeff Adachi, Michela Alioto-Pier, John Avalos, David Chiu, Bevan Dufty, Dennis Herrera, Ed Lee, Phil Ting and Leland Yee.[14][15]
  • October 5, 2011: The League of Women Voters of San Francisco (LWVSF), in partnership with UCSF, hosted a mayoral candidate debate at the The Robertson Auditorium, UCSF Mission Bay at 1675 Owens Street. Cheryl Jennings of ABC-7 was the moderator. In attendance were Jeff Adachi, Michela Alioto-Pier, John Avalos, Terry Joan Baum, David Chiu, Bevan Dufty, Tony Hall, Dennis Herrera, Ed Lee, Joanna Rees, Phil Ting, Leland Yee.[16][17]

Polling[edit]

  • Note: Results are for first choice only
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Adachi Alioto-Pier Ascarrunz Avalos Baum Chiu Currier Dufty Hall Herrera Lawrence Lee Pang Rees Ting Yee Other/
undecided
Survey USA March 10–15, 2011 544 ±4.3% 12% 10% 8% 9% 17% 1% 11% 32%
Survey USA July 30–31, 2011 528 ±4.4% 7% 10% 4% 10% 10% 35% 1% 1% 8% 14%
Public Opinion Strategies August 14–16, 2011 500 5% 4% 6% 3% 5% 1% 7% 29% 3% 0% 7% 28%
Bay Citizen/USF October 7–13, 2011 551 ±4.4% 5.1% 4% 7.4% 3.1% 5.2% 3.2% 8.1% 31.2% 2.5% 0.5% 6.5% 21.1%

Results[edit]

Results Summary[edit]

The following table shows a summary of the instant runoff for the election. The table shows the round in which the candidate was defeated or elected the winner, the votes for the candidate in that round, and what share those votes were of all votes counting for any candidate in that round. There is also a bar graph showing those votes for each candidate and categorized as either first-round votes or votes that were transferred from another candidate.

Municipal elections in California are officially non-partisan, though most candidates in San Francisco do receive funding and support from various political parties.

San Francisco mayoral election, 2011[18]
Party Candidate
Maximum
Round
Maximum
Votes
Share in
Maximum
Round
Maximum Votes
 First Round Votes  Transfer Votes 
Democratic Ed Lee (incumbent) 12 84,457 59.64%
Democratic John Avalos 12 57,160 40.36%
Democratic Dennis Herrera 11 37,142 22.59%
Democratic David Chiu 10 25,267 14.51%
Democratic Leland Yee 9 18,016 9.98%
Democratic Jeff Adachi 8 15,670 8.43%
Democratic Bevan Dufty 7 10,455 5.56%
Independent Tony Hall 6 7,896 4.14%
Democratic Michela Alioto-Pier 5 7,378 3.82%
Independent Joanna Rees 4 3,185 1.64%
Green Terry Joan Baum 4 1,738 0.89%
Democratic Phil Ting 4 1,049 0.54%
Republican Cesar Ascarrunz 4 583 0.30%
Republican Wilma Pang 3 469 0.24%
(unknown) Emil Lawrence 2 397 0.20%
Democratic Paul Currier 1 248 0.13%
Independent Write-in 1 38 0.02%
San Francisco mayoral election, 2011[19]
First Round Ballot Summary
  Count
Share of
Contest
Ballots
Continuing Votes 194,418 98.57%
Over Votes 820 0.42%
Under Votes 2,004 1.02%
Contest Ballots 197,242 100.00%
Registered Voters 464,380
Contest Turnout 42.47%


Vote counts by round[edit]

The following table shows how votes were counted[18] in a series of rounds of instant runoffs. Each voter could mark which candidates were the voter's first, second, and third choice. Each voter had one vote, but could mark three choices for how that vote can be counted. In each round, the vote is counted for the most preferred candidate that has not yet been eliminated. Then one or more candidates with the fewest votes are eliminated. Votes that counted for an eliminated candidate are transferred to the voter's next most preferred candidate that has not yet been eliminated.

Candidate Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4 Round 5 Round 6 Round 7 Round 8 Round 9 Round 10 Round 11 Round 12
Ed Lee 59,775 59,796 59,822 59,899 60,610 61,747 63,495 65,142 67,542 71,133 78,615 84,457
John Avalos 37,445 37,472 37,481 37,497 38,871 39,320 39,524 41,035 42,877 45,505 48,638 57,160
Dennis Herrera 21,914 21,937 21,958 21,977 22,606 23,531 24,257 27,081 29,673 32,276 37,142
David Chiu 17,921 17,929 17,946 17,994 18,495 18,957 19,326 20,327 22,461 25,267
Leland Yee 14,609 14,621 14,634 14,666 15,030 15,631 16,021 16,691 18,016
Jeff Adachi 12,534 12,557 12,586 12,624 13,156 13,728 15,048 15,670
Bevan Dufty 9,208 9,220 9,230 9,244 9,583 10,133 10,455
Tony Hall 6,930 6,958 7,001 7,025 7,397 7,896
Michela Alioto-Pier 6,648 6,660 6,694 6,720 7,378
Joanna Rees 3,104 3,111 3,143 3,185
Terry Joan Baum 1,665 1,676 1,698 1,738
Phil Ting 1,016 1,022 1,030 1,049
Cesar Ascarrunz 537 551 578 583
Wilma Pang 444 456 469
Emil Lawrence 382 397
Paul Currier 248
Write-in 38
Continuing votes 194,418 194,363 194,270 194,201 193,126 190,943 188,126 185,946 180,569 174,181 164,395 141,617
Exhausted ballots 0 55 144 212 1,272 3,429 6,232 8,401 13,735 20,070 29,828 52,524
Over Votes 820 820 824 825 840 866 880 891 934 987 1,015 1,097
Under Votes 2,004 2,004 2,004 2,004 2,004 2,004 2,004 2,004 2,004 2,004 2,004 2,004
Total 197,242 197,242 197,242 197,242 197,242 197,242 197,242 197,242 197,242 197,242 197,242 197,242

Continuing votes are votes that counted for a candidate in that round. Exhausted ballots represent votes that could not be transferred because a less preferred candidate was not marked on the ballot. Voters were allowed to mark only three choices because of voting system limitations. Over votes are votes that could not be counted for a candidate because more than one candidate was marked for a choice that was ready to be counted. Under votes are ballots were left blank or that only marked a choice for a write-in candidate that had not qualified as a write-in candidate.

References[edit]

  1. ^ John Coté and Heather Knight (November 8, 2011). "Ed Lee takes large early lead in mayor's race". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  2. ^ Coté, John; Rachel Gordon (January 11, 2011). "Gavin Newsom changes offices at last". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved January 11, 2011. 
  3. ^ Coté, John (January 11, 2011). "Ed Lee becomes the city's first Chinese American mayor". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved January 11, 2011. 
  4. ^ McKinley, Jesse (June 30, 2011). "San Francisco Is Awash With Mayoral Candidates". The New York Times. Retrieved July 10, 2011. 
  5. ^ Knight, Heather (July 31, 2011). "What happens if Lee breaks his promise?". San Francisco Chronicle. p. C1. 
  6. ^ Romney, Lee (August 8, 2011). "Ed Lee announces run for San Francisco mayor". Los Angeles Times. 
  7. ^ Sabatini, Joshua (July 10, 2011). "SF mayoral election to change shape as ranked-choice voting debuts". San Francisco Examiner. Retrieved July 10, 2011. 
  8. ^ "November 8, 2011 Qualified Candidate List" (PDF). San Francisco Department of Elections. Retrieved August 17, 2011. 
  9. ^ Cesarascarruns.org Candidate website
  10. ^ Devine, Anne-Marie (May 5, 2011). "Mayoral Candidate Forum on Service". University of San Francisco. Retrieved July 12, 2011. 
  11. ^ Fretwell, Luke (June 22, 2011). "Closing out SFOpen 2011". sf.GovFresh. Retrieved July 12, 2011. 
  12. ^ "Mayoral Candidates' Forum". Eventbrite. July 11, 2011. Retrieved July 12, 2011. 
  13. ^ Video of July 11 debate closing statements.
  14. ^ "9 S.F. mayoral candidates stress Jewish, Israel bona fides". jweekly. September 1, 2011. Retrieved September 2, 2011. 
  15. ^ "RAOUL WALLENBERG JEWISH DEMOCRATIC CLUB HOSTS SAN FRANCISCO MAYORAL CANDIDATES DEBATE AUGUST 24". San Francisco Sentinel. August 23, 2011. Retrieved September 2, 2011. 
  16. ^ "ABC7 News' recording of the League of Women Voters of San Francisco October 5 mayoral debate". [1]. October 5, 2011. Retrieved October 5, 2011. 
  17. ^ LWVSF YouTube Channel "League of Women Voters of San Francisco YouTube channel's video statements from all the mayoral candidates". LWVSF. September 14, 2011. Retrieved September 14, 2011. 
  18. ^ a b http://www.sfelections.org/results/20111108/data/mayor.html
  19. ^ http://www.sfelections.org/results/20111108/

External links[edit]

Campaign websites