San Joaquin, California

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Not to be confused with San Joaquin County, California.
City of San Joaquin
City
Location in Fresno County and the state of California
Location in Fresno County and the state of California
Coordinates: 36°36′24″N 120°11′21″W / 36.60667°N 120.18917°W / 36.60667; -120.18917Coordinates: 36°36′24″N 120°11′21″W / 36.60667°N 120.18917°W / 36.60667; -120.18917
Country  United States
State  California
County Fresno
Incorporated February 14, 1920[1]
Government
 • Mayor Amarpreet Dhaliwal[2]
 • State Senator Jean Fuller (R)[3]
 • State Assembly Henry Perea (D)[4]
 • U. S. Congress David Valadao (R)[5]
Area[6]
 • Total 1.148 sq mi (2.973 km2)
 • Land 1.148 sq mi (2.973 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation[7] 174 ft (53 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 4,001
 • Density 3,500/sq mi (1,300/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 93660
Area code(s) 559
FIPS code 06-67126
GNIS feature IDs 277594, 2411789
Website www.cityofsanjoaquin.org

San Joaquin is a city in Fresno County, California, United States. The population was 4,001 at the 2010 census, up from 3,270 at the 2000 census. The nearest high school in the area is Tranquillity High School in Tranquillity. San Joaquin is located 11 miles (18 km) southwest of Kerman,[8] at an elevation of 174 feet (53 m).[7]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city incorporates a total area of 1.1 square miles (2.8 km2), all of it land.

History[edit]

The first post office opened in San Joaquin in 1913.[8] San Joaquin incorporated in 1920.[8]

Demographics[edit]

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[9] reported that San Joaquin had a population of 4,001. The population density was 3,485.3 people per square mile (1,345.7/km²). The racial makeup of San Joaquin was 1,966 (49.1%) White, 31 (0.8%) African American, 54 (1.3%) Native American, 37 (0.9%) Asian, 0 (0.0%) Pacific Islander, 1,766 (44.1%) from other races, and 147 (3.7%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3,825 persons (95.6%).

The Census reported that 4,001 people (100% of the population) lived in households, 0 (0%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 882 households, out of which 660 (74.8%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 601 (68.1%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 163 (18.5%) had a female householder with no husband present, 51 (5.8%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 47 (5.3%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 1 (0.1%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 48 households (5.4%) were made up of individuals and 20 (2.3%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 4.54. There were 815 families (92.4% of all households); the average family size was 4.66.

The population was spread out with 1,652 people (41.3%) under the age of 18, 428 people (10.7%) aged 18 to 24, 1,100 people (27.5%) aged 25 to 44, 646 people (16.1%) aged 45 to 64, and 175 people (4.4%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 23.6 years. For every 100 females there were 103.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 106.6 males.

There were 934 housing units at an average density of 813.6 per square mile (314.1/km²), of which 406 (46.0%) were owner-occupied, and 476 (54.0%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.9%; the rental vacancy rate was 6.3%. 1,997 people (49.9% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 2,004 people (50.1%) lived in rental housing units.

2000[edit]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 3,270 people, 702 households, and 636 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,302.4 people per square mile (1,275.3/km²). There were 735 housing units at an average density of 742.3 per square mile (286.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 35.44% White, 0.21% Black or African American, 1.56% Native American, 3.61% Asian, 53.73% from other races, and 5.44% from two or more races. 91.99% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 702 households out of which 67.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.9% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 9.3% were non-families. 6.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 4.66 and the average family size was 4.79.

In the city the population was spread out with 41.2% under the age of 18, 14.2% from 18 to 24, 27.9% from 25 to 44, 12.7% from 45 to 64, and 4.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 22 years. For every 100 females there were 113.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 114.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $24,934, and the median income for a family was $25,441. Males had a median income of $20,382 versus $16,023 for females. The per capita income for the city was $6,607. About 33.9% of families and 34.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 41.1% of those under age 18 and 23.7% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

San Joaquin suffers from poor educational standards and achievements. According to New York Times columnist David Brooks, only " 2.9 percent of the residents have bachelor’s degrees and 20.6 percent have high school degrees" [11] which Brooks claims makes long-term economic development and poverty alleviation unlikely.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date" (Word). California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Retrieved April 6, 2013. 
  2. ^ "City of San Joaquin". Retrieved April 6, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Senators". State of California. Retrieved April 6, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved April 6, 2013. 
  5. ^ "California's 21st Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved April 6, 2013. 
  6. ^ U.S. Census
  7. ^ a b "San Joaquin". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. 
  8. ^ a b c Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Clovis, Calif.: Word Dancer Press. p. 1102. ISBN 1-884995-14-4. 
  9. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - San Joaquin city". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014. 
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  11. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/25/opinion/brooks-the-great-migration.html?hp&_r=3&

External links[edit]